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Security

Grsecurity SLAPP Case Defeated

Filed under
GNU
Security
Legal
  • Kernel hardening group's suit against open source advocate thrown out

    A judge in San Francisco has granted a motion by noted open source advocate Bruce Perens to dismiss a defamation suit filed against him by Grsecurity, a group that supplies a patch for hardening the Linux kernel.

    Magistrate judge Laurel Beeler agreed to Perens' (right, below) motion on Thursday but denied his bid to invoke the anti-SLAPP (Strategic Lawsuit Against Public Participation) law in California.

    This law deals with legal complaints that are directed at stopping public discussion and free speech. California put in place an anti-SLAPP law in 1992.

  • Court Throws Out Libel Lawsuit Brought by Open Source Security

    The defendant Bruce Perens -- who is a respected programmer known for his founding of the Open Source Initiative -- criticized OSS's business model for distributing its security patches on the ground that it violated the open-source license and thus potentially subjected users to liability for copyright infringement or breach of contract. The plaintiffs [sued, basically for defamation -EV]....

Security: Russia, China, Mirai Variant, Firefox and Grsecurity/Perens

Filed under
Security

Security: Russia, China, Mirai Variant, Firefox and Grsecurity/Perens

Filed under
Security

Linux >=4.9: eBPF memory corruption bugs

Filed under
Linux
Security

A few BPF verifier bugs in the Linux kernel, most of which can be used
for controlled memory corruption, have been fixed over the last days.
One of the bugs was introduced in 4.9, the others were only introduced
in 4.14.

The fixes are in the net tree of the Linux kernel
(https://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/davem/net...),
but not in Linus' tree yet.

The following bug was introduced in 4.9:

Read more

Security: NSA Explots, Wi-Fi, and BPF

Filed under
Security
  • Zealot Loads Cryptocurrency Miner on Linux, Windows Machines

    A new Apache Struts campaign that researchers named "Zealot" has come to light in recent weeks. Zealot loads Windows or Linux-based machines by installing a miner for Monero, which has become one of the hottest cryptocurrencies used in recent malware attacks.

  • 8 Best WiFi Hacking Software And Analysis Tools You Should Use In 2018

    Security analysis and penetration testing is an integral part of creating any kind of secure network. This brings us to the WiFi hacking software that could be used for ethically testing a wireless network and make amends. In the past, we’ve already covered the top wireless security apps for Android and now it’s the turn of such tools for your PC. In case you’re looking for a more diverse collection of tools (not for just wireless analysis), you can refer to another list.

  • BPF security issues in Debian

    Since Debian 9 "stretch", we've shipped a Linux kernel supporting the "enhanced BPF" feature which allows unprivileged user space to upload code into the kernel. This code is written in a restricted language, but one that's much richer than the older "classic" BPF. The kernel verifies that the code is safe (doesn't loop, only accesses memory it is supposed to, etc.) before running it. However, this means that bugs in the verifier could allow unsafe programs to compromise the kernel's security.

Security: Windows and Facebook Messenger

Filed under
Security
  • “I Just Pressed Shift Key 5 Times” — User Gains Full Access On A Windows XP ATM Machine

    When you’re running Windows XP in today’s times, you shouldn’t expect your machine to fully bulletproof against different kinds of malware attacks. Now combine it with some poor implementation on an ATM machine that demands heavy security measures and you’ve got a recipe for disaster.

  • Windows XP ATM Machine “Hacked” by Simply Pressing Shift Five Times in a Row

    We’ve known for a while that ATM machines running Windows XP (Embedded version or not) are exposed to attacks, but when we mix the lack of updates with bad configuration from IT admins what we get is a vulnerability that’s worryingly easy to exploit.

    One of the users of Russian blogging platform Habrahabr discovered that an ATM machine operated by state-owned bank Sberbank runs Windows XP and suffers from a security hole that makes it possible for pretty much anyone to completely hack it.

    While it’s not hard to figure out what hacking of an ATM machine means, it appears that the full-screen lock system that prevented the ATM interface from accessing other parts of the operating system could be bypassed by simply invoking Sticky Keys.

  • Cryptojacking Bot “Digimine” Spreading Via FB Messenger in Google Chrome Desktop

    Cryptocurrency mining is on the rise and so does the number of instances where wrong ways are used to harvest the digital currency. Just a day before yesterday, we told you about the Loapi Android malware that mines Monero on your device. Even if you’re sitting at a place like Starbucks, mining can happen anytime.

  • Digmine Cryptocurrency Miner Spreading via Facebook Messenger

    We found a new cryptocurrency-mining bot spreading through Facebook Messenger, which we first observed in South Korea. We named this Digmine based on the moniker (비트코인 채굴기 bot) it was referred to in a report of recent related incidents in South Korea. We’ve also seen Digmine spreading in other regions such as Vietnam, Azerbaijan, Ukraine, Vietnam, Philippines, Thailand, and Venezuela. It’s not far-off for Digmine to reach other countries given the way it propagates.

Security: Updates, Synopsys/Black Duck FUD, and Two-Factor Security Authentication

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Synopsys: Going the distance with open source vulnerabilities [Ed: Having absorbed the Microsoft-connected FUD firm Black Duck, Synopsys is now a FUD source against FOSS. Puff pieces like these one will be common.]
  • Twitter Expands Two-Factor Security Authentication Options

    Back in May 2013, Twitter first added a Two-Factor Authentication (2FA) capability to its service, relying on SMS to deliver a six-digit login code. Now after four and a half years, Twitter is adding new options, announcing on Dec. 20 that its' 2FA approach will support third party tools.

    Twitter calls its' 2FA approach login verification and it provides a second layer of authentication and protection for Twitter accounts. Rather than just having a username and a password to get access to an account, 2FA approaches require a second password, that is randomly generated by a secondary device, or service like SMS.

    "We're rolling out an update to login verification," the official Twitter Safety account wrote in a message. "You’ll now be able to use a third party app for two-factor authentication instead of SMS text messages."

Security: Talking to Your Family About Digital Security, VLC, Rutkowska's Talk and Updates

Filed under
Security
  • How to Talk to Your Family About Digital Security

    You and your family are sipping hot cocoa, gathered around the [holiday object of your choice], and your family member suddenly asks: “Can you help me with my [insert device here]?”

    They need a question answered about their computer, phone, tablet, video game console, or internet-connected device. Maybe they have related questions about their online accounts.

    Or maybe there is a teenager or college student in your family that posts intensely personal information online, and has just realized that they should probably maintain more privacy in their online lives—but isn’t sure how to start.

  • EU offers cash bounties to improve the security of VLC media player

    You can now submit bugs you find in VLC Media Player on HackerOne, where bounties ranging from $100 for low-severity bugs and up to $2,000 for critical bugs are offered.

    With a total budget of €60,000, the VLC bug bounty is only a first “proof of concept” bug bounty in order to learn more about how to run future bounties within FOSSA-2.

  • Security through Distrusting

    At one extreme, we would like to ensure everything (software, hardware, infrastructure) is trusted. This means the code has no bugs or backdoors, patches are always available and deployed, admins always competent and trustworthy, and the infrastructure always reliable…

    On the other end of the spectrum, however, we would like to distrust (nearly) all components and actors, and have no single almighty element in the system.

    In my opinion, the industry has been way too much focused on this first approach, which I see as overly naive and non-scalable to more complex systems.

  • Rutkowska: Trust Makes Us Vulnerable

    Rutkowska argued that security professionals can - and should - minimize their trust in modern technologies, many of which could put users at risk. She presented several examples of how current technology leaves users vulnerable and how they could potentially be made secure.

  • Security updates for Wednesday

Security: Bromium, EternalBlue/EternalSynerg, Updates, Reproducible Builds and Zealot Campaign

Filed under
Security

Security: CryptoJacking Android FUD, North Korea Blamed for NSA/Microsoft Back Doors

Filed under
Security
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Linux Kernel 4.15 Reached End of Life, Users Urged to Move to Linux 4.16 Now

After a very busy cycle due to the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities, which were publicly disclosed earlier this year and later discovered to put billions of devices using modern processors at risk of attacks, the Linux 4.15 kernel series was released at the of January heavily redesign against two critical hardware bugs. Now, nearly three months and only eighteen maintenance updates later, the Linux 4.15 kernel series reached end of life and it will no longer receive support. As such, all those using a kernel from the Linux 4.15 branch on their GNU/Linux distributions are urged to upgrade to the latest Linux 4.16 kernel series as soon as possible. Read more

LibreOffice 6.1 Lands Mid August 2018, First Bug Hunting Session Starts April 27

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This Chart Shows How The Radeon RX 580 vs. GeForce GTX 1060 Now Compete Under Linux

It was just last year that open-source RadeonSI/RADV developers were trying to get the Radeon RX 580 "Polaris" GPU to be competitive with the GeForce GTX 1060 as it is under Windows given each GPU's capabilities. We've seen the RX 580 and GTX 1060 dancing under Linux the past few months and yesterday's 20-way GPU comparison with Rise of the Tomb Raider was quite significant -- perhaps most surprising being how well the RX 580 performed. Heck, just one or two years ago it was an accomplishment seeing any official Radeon driver support at-launch for new Linux game releases. So here are some extensive tests looking closer at the GTX 1060 vs. RX 580 battle in this latest Vulkan-powered Linux game port. Read more

Linux 4.9.95

I'm announcing the release of the 4.9.95 kernel. All users of the 4.9 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.9.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.9.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st... Read more