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Security

Automatically Scan Uploaded Files For Viruses With php-clamavlib

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu
HowTos

This guide describes how you can automatically scan files uploaded by users through a web form on your server using PHP and ClamAV. That way you can make sure that your upload form will not be abused to distribute malware. To glue PHP and ClamAV, we install the package php5-clamavlib/php4-clamavlib which is rather undocumented at this time. That package is available for Debian Etch and Sid and also for Ubuntu Dapper Drake and Edgy Eft.

Opera Has Words For Mozilla

Filed under
Software
Security

Opera Software is calling accusations made by Mozilla staffer Asa Dotzler regarding Opera's security disclosure policies, "dangerous and irresponsible."

Some unpleasant X.org vulnerabilities

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Security

iDefense Lab security researchers discovered that the expressions computing the parameters for ALLOCATE_LOCAL() in those functions are using client-provided value in an expression that is subject to integer overflows, which could lead to memory corruption. All X.Org X server version implementing the X render and dbe extensions are vulnerable.

Mozilla Takes Aim at Opera Security

Filed under
Software
Security

Opera Software may well be putting its browser users at risk by not properly disclosing security vulnerabilities to vulnerable users. At least that's the allegation made by Mozilla Corp.'s Asa Dotzler.

Opera on Handling Security

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Security

Recently, some of our users have asked why we chose to disclose a potential security issue only after the release of Opera 9.10. Let me try to give a short overview on how security issues get reported and disclosed - and not only at Opera, but in most applications: it might help some people to understand how this works.

"Apple Bug" number six hits Windows, Linux too

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Security

The Month of Apple Bugs has turned up another cross-platform issue - this time one that affects Windows, Linux and potentially other operating systems in addition to Mac OS X.

Patch issued for OpenOffice.org vulnerability

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Security

A patch has been widely released for a vulnerability in the OpenOffice.org productivity suite, a problem rated as "highly critical" by one security vendor.

Linux Kernel Various Vulnerabilities

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Security

Some vulnerabilities have been reported within the Linux kernel, which can be exploited by malicious, local users and malicious people to cause a DoS (Denial of Service).

Configuration: the forgotten side of security

Filed under
Security
HowTos

When the average computer user thinks about security, they usually think about reactive measures like anti-virus programs or security patches -- responses to a specific threat. A more efficient approach is to configure a system securely from the start.

Password Management Concerns with IE and Firefox

Filed under
Security

This two-part paper presents an analysis of the security mechanisms, risks, attacks, and defenses of the two most commonly used password management systems for web browsers, found in Internet Explorer and Firefox.

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Spaceman Shuttleworth Finds Earthly Riches With Ubuntu Software

He’s best known for being the world’s first “Afronaut,” but since returning to Earth from his 2002 trip on Russia’s Soyuz TM-34 rocket ship, Cape Town native Mark Shuttleworth set about with the conquest of a much more lucrative universe: the internet-of-things. Shuttleworth created Ubuntu, an open-source Linux operating system that helps connect everything from drones to thermostats to the internet. His company, Canonical Group Ltd., makes money from about 800 paying customers, including Netflix Inc., Tesla Inc. and Deutsche Telekom AG, which pay for support services. Its success has helped boost his net worth to $1 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index. “It’s destructive to be too focused on that,” Shuttleworth said of his wealth in an interview at Bloomberg’s office in Boston. “It’s just a distraction from whether you have your finger on the pulse of what’s next.” Read more Also:

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    Created in Brazil, Rocket.Chat provides an open source chat solution for organisations of all sizes around the world. Built on open source values and a love of efficiency, Rocket.Chat is driven by a community of contributors and has seen adoption in all aspects of business and education. As Rocket.Chat has evolved, it has been keen to get its platform into the hands of as many users as possible without the difficulties of installation often associated with bespoke Linux deployments.
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    The Silph Road is the premier grassroots network for Pokémon GO players around the world offering research, tools, and resources to the largest Pokémon GO community worldwide, with up to 400,000 visitors per day Operating a volunteer-run, community network with up to 400,000 daily visitors is no easy task especially in the face of massive and unpredictable demand spikes, and with developers spread all over the world.With massive user demand and with volunteer developers located all over the world, The Silph Road’s operations must be cost-effective, flexible, and scalable. This led the Pokémon GO network first to cloud, and then to containers and in both cases Canonical ’s technology was the answer.