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Security

Have hackers recruited your PC?

Filed under
Security

BBC news has posted an article relating a study "by security researchers who have spent months tracking more than 100 networks of remotely-controlled machines. They discovered 'bot nets [were]used to launch 226 distributed denial-of-service attacks on 99 separate targets.'"

KDE DCop DoS Vulnerability prior to 3.4

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KDE
Security

Sebastian Krahmer has reported a vulnerability in KDE, which can be exploited by malicious, local users to cause a DoS (Denial of Service).

The vulnerability is caused due to an error in the authentication process in the DCOP (Desktop Communication Protocol) daemon dcopserver. This can be exploited to lock the dcopserver for arbitrary local users. Successful exploitation may result in decreased desktop functionality for the affected user.

The vulnerability has been reported in versions prior to 3.4.

Solution: Upgrade to KDE 3.4 or apply patch.

Click for more information and links to patches.

Original information on dot.kde.org.

US cyber-security 'nearly failing'

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Security

Cyber-security in the US is "nearly failing" and has been given a "must try harder" D+ rating by the Federal government.

The US Office of Management and Budget set forth cyber-security standards in the Federal Security Management Act 2002, encouraging federal agencies to tighten their IT systems.

Windows Media Player Digital Rights Management Spy

Filed under
Microsoft
Security

This is something really nasty in the XP filing system... it's in Windows Media Player, and it not only has all the information about Digital Rights Management, it also has all the information about your local police force..... QED... Not only is microsoft spying on you, they are also telling the cops what you have got on your system....

US DHS buys more name analysis tools

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Security

The Homeland Security Department's Customs and Border Protection agency, an arm of the Border and Transportation Security Directorate, has signed a sole-source contract with Language Analysis Systems Inc. of Herndon, Va., for additional software to help analyze names of people.

The software is particularly useful in winnowing the names of terrorists out of lists of passengers or other data sources.

Linux Advisory Watch - March 11, 2005

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Security

This week, advisories were released for clamav, kernel, squid, kppp, helixplayer, tzdata, libtool, firefox, ipsec-tools, dmraid, gaim, libexif, gimp, yum, grip, libXpm, xv, ImageMagick, Hashcash, mlterm, dcoidlng, curl, gftp, cyrus-imapd, unixODBC, and mc. The distributors include Conectiva, Debian, Fedora, Gentoo, Mandrake, Red Hat, and SuSE.

Full Details.

Identity Theft Bill Puts Companies On Spot

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Security

The pressure from Capitol Hill on corporate America to clean up its act with regard to safeguarding sensitive customer information continues to increase, as Sen. Jon Corzine said Thursday that he plans to introduce a new bill next week that will require corporate officers to attest that their companies have adequate measures in place to secure customers' personal data.

Interesting Blog

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Security

Interesting Spam: Old school Ascii art making a comeback?

"Two days ago I got my first Ascii spam which is undoubtedly just another technique to get past email filters. The spam consists of the staples, forged To: and From: with the intended recipient on the BCC. Then it starts its HTML tags, and uses the PRE tags to format the Ascii text so that it views correctly in a variety of email clients."

Link with pictures.

Companies Should Give Online Consumers More Privacy

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Security

"To quell the privacy-invasion fears that are stunting the growth of e-commerce, Web marketers need to give consumers more control of the personal information collected about them, according to research by Naresh Malhotra, Regents' professor of marketing at Georgia Tech College of Management."

Big Brother is Watching your Toyota Sienna

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Security

"The 2005 Toyota Sienna (I'm not sure about earlier models) has an Event Data Recorder (EDR) which is a black box of sorts (sans the audio recording). In the event of a crash, near crash, or airbag deployment, it records various data such as vehicle speed, engine speed, driver seat position, gear selector position, etc."

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