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Security

Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Security updates for Friday
  • Eight-year-old Linux security flaw finally fixed

    ANOTHER years-old vulnerability in the Linux kernel has been patched - the fourth such ageing security flaw that has been patched recently.

  • Paving with Good Intentions: The Attempt to Rescue the Network Time Protocol

    After the Heartbleed bug revealed in April 2014 how understaffed and under-funded the OpenSSL project was, the Network Time Foundation was discovered to be one of several projects in a similar condition. Unfortunately, thanks to a project fork, the efforts to lend NTP support have only divided the development community and created two projects scrambling for funds where originally there was only one.

  • Mozilla: Everyone's scared of hackers but clueless about fending them off

    According to Firefox maker Mozilla, we're nearly all afraid of hackers, but few of us feel we can protect ourselves from them.

    The non-profit's survey of 30,000 people found internet users' confidence is extremely low when it comes to privacy and security. The survey found that 90 percent of people are unsure how to protect themselves online, while 11.5 percent feel they know nothing about security.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Dormant Linux kernel vulnerability finally slayed

    A recently resolved vulnerability in the Linux kernel that had the potential to allow an attacker to gain privilege escalation or cause denial of service went undiscovered for seven years.

    Positive Technologies expert, Alexander Popov, found a race condition in the n_hdlc driver that leads to double-freeing of kernel memory. This Linux kernel flaw might be exploited for privilege escalation in the operating system. The (CVE-2017-2636) bug was evaluated as dangerous with a CVSS v3 score of 7.8, towards the higher end of the scale which runs from 1-10.

  • Another Years-Old Flaw Fixed in the Linux Kernel

    The Linux team has patched a "dangerous" vulnerability in the Linux kernel that allowed attackers to elevate their access rights and crash affected systems.

    The security issue, tracked as CVE-2017-2636, existed in the Linux kernel for the past seven years, after being introduced in the code in 2009.

How to Choose the Best Linux Distro for SysAdmin Workstation Security

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GNU
Linux
Security

If you’re a systems administrator choosing a Linux distribution for your workstation, chances are you’ll stick with a fairly widely used distro such as Fedora, Ubuntu, Arch, Debian, or one of their close spin-offs. Still, there are several security considerations you should weigh when picking which distribution is best for your needs.

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Also: Linux Sucks — The Latest And Last From Bryan Lunduke

Security News

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Security

Security News

Filed under
Security

Security News

Filed under
Security

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security

Parrot Security OS 3.5 Improves Linux Security Tools Distribution

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OS
Linux
Security

There seems to be no shortage of Linux distributions specifically designed and built for security researchers. That list includes the Parrot Security OS Linux distribution, which was updated to version 3.5 on March 8. The Parrot Security OS platform is based on the Debian Linux distribution, with the open-source MATE desktop the default choice for new users. As a platform for security researchers, Parrot Security OS provides a wide array of tools that fit into different categories, including information gathering, vulnerability analysis, database assessment, exploitation tools, password attacks, wireless testing, digital forensics, reverse engineering and reporting tools. One of its more interesting tools is the open-source Kayak car hacking tool that can be used to diagnose a car's CAN (Controller Area Network) bus. In addition, version 3.5 includes the CryptKeeper encrypted folder manager tool, as well as the Metasploit penetration testing framework, which is packed full with 1,627 exploits. For users who want to stay somewhat anonymous while using the system, anonymous web surfing tools are also included in the Linux distribution. In this slide show, eWEEK takes a look at some of the highlights of the Parrot Security OS 3.5 release.

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More in Tux Machines

Development News

Security Leftovers

  • How To Improve The Linux System’s Security Using Firejail
    As you already know, Linux kernel is secure by default. But, it doesn’t mean that the softwares on the Linux system are completely secure. Say for example, there is a possibility that any add-ons on your web browser may cause some serious security issues. While doing financial transactions over internet, some key logger may be active in browser which you are not aware of. Even though, we can’t completely give the bullet-proof security to our Linux box, we still can add an extra pinch of security using an application called Firejail. It is a security utility which can sandbox any such application and let it to run in a controlled environment. To put this simply, Firejail is a SUID (Set owner User ID up on execution) program that reduces the risk of security breaches by restricting the running environment of untrusted applications.
  • “Httpd and Relayd Mastery” off to copyedit
  • Kalyna Block Cipher

Containers vs. Zones vs. Jails vs. VMs

  • Setting the Record Straight: containers vs. Zones vs. Jails vs. VMs
    I’m tired of having the same conversation over and over again with people so I figured I would put it into a blog post. Many people ask me if I have tried or what I think of Solaris Zones / BSD Jails. The answer is simply: I have tried them and I definitely like them. The conversation then heads towards them telling me how Zones and Jails are far superior to containers and that I should basically just give up with Linux containers and use VMs. Which to be honest is a bit forward to someone who has spent a large portion of her career working with containers and trying to make containers more secure. Here is what I tell them:
  • [Old] Hadoop Has Failed Us, Tech Experts Say

    The Hadoop community has so far failed to account for the poor performance and high complexity of Hadoop, Johnson says. “The Hadoop ecosystem is still basically in the hands of a small number of experts,” he says. “If you have that power and you’ve learned know how to use these tools and you’re programmer, then this thing is super powerful. But there aren’t a lot of those people. I’ve read all these things how we need another million data scientists in the world, which I think means our tools aren’t very good.”

Wine and Games

  • [Wine] Packaging changes
    Today we want to announce some important changes regarding the Wine Staging packages provided at repos.wine-staging.com and dl.winehq.org. We completely reworked our build system to make the packages available sooner after a release and also added some new features, like downloading old packages for Debian / Ubuntu. The complete list of changes can be found in the announcement email on the Wine mailing list.
  • Planescape: Torment Enhanced Edition Announced for PC, Mac, Linux, and Mobile
  • Podcast #6 with Ethan Lee, Porter on Fez, Transistor
    Have you ever played Fez on Linux ? Transistor ? Speed Runners ? Shenzen I/O ? Bastion ? or more recently, Owlboy ? Well if you have, you have benefited from the work of Flibitijibibo who is directly responsible for the port of such titles to your platform.