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Security

Security: Cryptocurrency Mining, Meltdown and Spectre, Updates, Cryptographic Key Generation

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Security
  • Cryptocurrency Mining Operations Take Aim at SSH Servers

    As the value of cryptocurrency continues to rise, there has been growing interest from attackers and security researchers alike.  

    So far in January 2018, multiple new attack vectors against cryptocurrencies have been disclosed as well as at least one major vulnerability. While there are potentially great opportunities to be had with cryptocurrency, the security issues serve as a reminder that there are risks too.

    A report released Jan. 8 alleges that among those now taking aim at cryptocurrency is the government of North Korea, which is conducting an un-authorized Monero mining operation. On Jan 3. a report from security firm F5 revealed that attackers are using a new python script to mine Monero on servers. While un-authorized mining operations are taking aim at servers, the security of the Electrum digital wallets used to access cryptocurrency has also been at risk and was patched on Jan. 7.

  • Clear Linux Rolls Out KPTI Page Isolation & Retpoline Support

    Intel's own Clear Linux distribution has now been updated with protection for addressing the Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities disclosed last week.

  • What You Need to Know About the Meltdown and Spectre CPU Flaws

    The computer industry is racing to deal with several new vulnerabilities that affect the majority of processors in modern computers and mobile devices. The flaws enable new attacks that break the critical memory defenses in operating systems and bypass fundamental isolation layers, including those vital to virtualization and container technologies.

    The most serious of the flaws, dubbed Meltdown or CVE-2017-5754, allows applications running in userspace to extract information from the kernel’s memory, which can contain sensitive data like passwords, encryption keys and other secrets. The good news is that Meltdown can be largely mitigated through software patches, unlike two other vulnerabilities known collectively as Spectre (CVE-2017-5753 and CVE-2017-5715) that will require CPU microcode updates and will likely haunt the industry for some time to come.

  • GCC 8 Patches Posted For Spectre Mitigation

    There's been a well-published branch the past few days of a patched GCC 7.2 code-base with the code changes for fending off Spectre while now patches have arrived on the mailing list for Spectre/CVE-2017-5715 of mainline GCC 8.

    Toolchain expert H.J. Lu of Intel has posted a set of five patches for Spectre mitigation with the current GCC 8 code-base. These patches introduce the new -mindirect-branch, -mindirect-branch-loop, -mfunction-return, -mindirect-branch-register options for GCC. Enabling the new functionality converts indirect branches to call and return thunks in order to avoid speculative execution.

  • Spectre and Meltdown explained

    I found this great article of Anton Gostev about Spectre and Meltdown, so I’m reposting it here :

    By now, most of you have probably already heard of the biggest disaster in the history of IT – Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities which affect all modern CPUs, from those in desktops and servers, to ones found in smartphones. Unfortunately, there’s much confusion about the level of threat we’re dealing with here, because some of the impacted vendors need reasons to explain the still-missing security patches. But even those who did release a patch, avoid mentioning that it only partially addresses the threat. And, there’s no good explanation of these vulnerabilities on the right level (not for developers), something that just about anyone working in IT could understand to make their own conclusion. So, I decided to give it a shot and deliver just that.

  • Weekend tech reading: Spectre/Meltdown recap, 400Gbps Ethernet, next-gen DisplayPort
  • Security updates for Monday
  • What cryptographic key generation needs is a good source of entropy

    Let's move to computers. As opposed to board games, you generally want a computer to do the same thing every time you ask it to do it, assuming you give it the same inputs: you want its behaviour to be deterministic when presented with the same initial conditions. Random behaviour is generally not a good thing for computers. There are, of course, exceptions to this rule, such as when you want to use your computer to play a game, as things get boring quickly if there's no variation in gameplay.

    There's another big exception: cryptography. Not all cryptography, though; you definitely want a single plaintext to be encrypted to a single ciphertext under the same key in almost all cases. But there is one area where randomness is important, and that's in the creation of the cryptographic key(s) you're going to be using to perform those operations. It turns out that you need to have quite a lot of randomness available to create a key that is unique—and keys really need to be truly unique. If you don't have enough randomness, not only might you generate the same key (or set of them) repeatedly, but other people may do so as well. If they can guess what keys you're using, they could do things like read your messages or pretend to be you.

Security: Meltdown and Spectre, Kaspersky, PowerPC

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Security

Meltdown and Spectre Linux Perspective

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Linux
Security
  • Linus Torvalds Is Not Happy About Intel's Meltdown and Spectre Mess

    Famed Linux developer Linus Torvalds has some pretty harsh words for Intel on the fiasco over Meltdown and Spectre, the massive security flaws in modern processors that predominantly affect Intel products.

    Meltdown and Spectre exploit an architectural flaw with the way processors handle speculative execution, a technique that most modern CPUs use to increase speed. Both classes of vulnerability could expose protected kernel memory, potentially allowing hackers to gain access to the inner workings of any unpatched system or penetrate security measures. The flaw can’t be fixed with a microcode update, meaning that developers for major OSes and platforms have had to devise workarounds that could seriously hurt performance.

  • Weekly Roundup 2018 – Week 1

    Mageia kernel updates to mitigate these two flaws are already being worked on. Mageia 6 kernel updates released in the last 24 hours don’t as yet solve all the problems, but kernel-4.14.12-2.mga6 is in updates/testing (as is the .mga7 kernel for Cauldron). Expect updates very shortly. Our thanks to our tireless kernel devs and our ever busy QA team!

  • DragonFlyBSD's Meltdown Fix Causing More Slowdowns Than Linux

    Following the move by Linux to introduced Kernel Page Table Isolation (KPTI) to address the Meltdown vulnerability affecting Intel CPUs, DragonFlyBSD has implemented better user/kernel separation to address this issue. While the Linux performance hit overall was minor, in our tests carried out so far the DragonFlyBSD kernel changes are causing more widespread slowdowns.

  • Episode 76 - Meltdown aftermath
  • Woo-yay, Meltdown CPU fixes are here. Now, Spectre flaws will haunt tech industry for years
  • Meltdown and Spectre Fixes Arrive—But Don't Solve Everything
  • Vendors Share Patch Updates on Spectre and Meltdown Mitigation Efforts

    Intel, Amazon, Microsoft and others are playing down concerns over the impact of the massive Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities affecting computers, servers and mobile devices worldwide.

    The two flaws, Spectre and Meltdown, are far reaching and impact a wide range of microprocessors used in the past decade in computers and mobile devices including those running Android, Chrome, iOS, Linux, macOS and Windows. While Meltdown only affects Intel processors, Spectre affects chips from Intel, AMD, ARM and others.

Security: CPU Bugs, Western Digital Back Doors

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Security
  • There will always be hardware bugs

    By now everyone has seen the latest exploit, meltdown and spectre, complete with logos and full academic paper. The gist of this is that side channel attacks on CPUs are now actually plausible instead of mostly theoretical. LWN (subscribe!) has a good collection of posts about actual technical details and mitigations. Because this involves hardware and not just software, fixes get more complicated.

  • What are Meltdown and Spectre? Here’s what you need to know.
  • Intel faces class action lawsuits regarding Meltdown and Spectre

    The three lawsuits—filed in California, Indiana, and Oregon (PDF)—cite not just the security vulnerabilities and their potential impact, but also Intel's response time to them. Researchers notified Intel about the flaws in June. Now, Intel faces a big headache. The vast majority of its CPUs in use today are impacted, and more class action complaints may be filed beyond these three.

  • Western Digital My Cloud drives have a built-in backdoor

    Western Digital's network attached storage solutions have a newfound vulnerability allowing for unrestricted root access.
    James Bercegay disclosed the vulnerability to Western Digital in mid-2017. After allowing six months to pass, the full details and proof-of-concept exploit have been published. No fix has been issued to date.
    More troubling is the existence of a hard coded backdoor with credentials that cannot be changed. Logging in to Western Digital My Cloud services can be done by anybody using "mydlinkBRionyg" as the administrator username and "abc12345cba" as the password. Once logged in, shell access is readily available followed with plenty of opportunity for injection of commands.

Security: Meltdown & Spectre, Critical CSRF Security Vulnerability, OpenVPN and More

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Security
  • Meltdown & Spectre
  • Meltdown and Spectre Linux Kernel Status

    By now, everyone knows that something “big” just got announced regarding computer security. Heck, when the Daily Mail does a report on it , you know something is bad…

    Anyway, I’m not going to go into the details about the problems being reported, other than to point you at the wonderfully written Project Zero paper on the issues involved here. They should just give out the 2018 Pwnie award right now, it’s that amazingly good.

    If you do want technical details for how we are resolving those issues in the kernel, see the always awesome lwn.net writeup for the details.

    Also, here’s a good summary of lots of other postings that includes announcements from various vendors.

  • Spectre and Meltdown: What you need to know going forward

    As you've likely heard by now, there are some problems with Intel, AMD, and ARM processors. Called Meltdown and Spectre, the discovered attack possibilities are rather severe, as they impact pretty much every technical device on the network or in your house (PCs, laptops, tablets, phones, etc.).

    Here's a breakdown of all the things you need to know. As things change, or new information becomes available, this article will be updated.

    The key thing to remember is not to panic, as the sky isn't about to come crashing down. The situation is one that centers on information disclosure, not code execution (a far more damning issue to deal with).

  • Open Source Leaders: Take Intel to Task

    I do not know Linus Torvalds or Theo de Raadt. I have never met either of them and have read very little about them. What I do know, gleaned from email archives, is when it comes to bum hardware: they both have pretty strong opinions. Both Linus and Theo can be a bit rough around the edges when it comes to giving their thoughts about hardware design flaws: but at least they have a voice. Also, Linus and Theo have often been at odds whether it be about how to approach OS design, licensing etc but I suspect, or I at least have to believe, the latest incident from intel (the Spectre and Meltdown flaws) is one area they agree on.

    Linus and Theo cannot possibly be the only Open Source leaders out there who are frustrated and tired of being jerked around by intel. What I hope comes out of this is not many different voices saying the same thing here and there but instead, perhaps, our various leaders could get together and take intel to task on this issue. Intel not only created a horrible design flaw they lied by omission about it for several months. During those months the Intel CEO quietly dumped his stock. What a hero.

  • Docker Performance With KPTI Page Table Isolation Patches

    Overall most of our benchmarks this week of the new Linux Kernel Page Table Isolation (KPTI) patches coming as a result of the Meltdown vulnerability have showed minimal impact overall on system performance. The exceptions have obviously been with workloads having high kernel interactions like demanding I/O cases and in terms of real-world impact, databases. But when testing VMs there's been some minor impact more broadly than bare metal testing and also Wine performance has been impacted. The latest having been benchmarked is seeing if the Docker performance has been impacted by the KPTI patches to see if it's any significant impact since overall the patched system overhead certainly isn't anything close to how it was initially hyped by some other media outlets.

  • Can We Replace Intel x86 With an Open Source Chip?
  • Critical CSRF Security Vulnerability in phpMyAdmin Database Tool Patched

    A "cross site request forgery" vulnerability in a popular tool for administrating MySQL and MariaDB databases that could lead to data loss has been patched.

  • 8 reasons to replace your VPN client with OpenVPN

    OpenVPN could be the answer. It's an ultra-configurable open source VPN client which works with just about any VPN provider that supports the OpenVPN protocol. It gives you new ways to automate, optimize, control and troubleshoot your connections, and you can use it alongside your existing client, or maybe replace it entirely – it's your call.

  • I’m harvesting credit card numbers and passwords from your site. Here’s how.

Security: Currencies, Marcus Hutchins, and Hardware Bugs

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Security
  • Hot New Cryptocurrency Trend: Mining Malware That Could Fry Your Phone
  • PyCryptoMiner Attacks Linux Machines And Turns Them Into Monero-mining Bots
  • Marcus Hutchins' lawyers seek information around arrest

    Lawyers acting for British security researcher Marcus Hutchins have filed a motion seeking additional information on a number of aspects surrounding his arrest in order to prepare for a trial that is expected to take place this year.

  • AMD Did NOT Disable Branch Prediction With A Zen Microcode Update

    With the plethora of software security updates coming out over the past few days in the wake of the Meltdown and Spectre disclosure, released by SUSE was a Family 17h "Zen" CPU microcode update that we have yet to see elsewhere... It claims to disables branch prediction, but I've confirmed with AMD that is not actually the case.

    AMD did post a processor security notice where they noted their hardware was not vulnerable to variant threee / rogue data cache load, for the "branch target injection" variant that there was "near zero risk" for exploiting, and with the bounds check bypass it would be resolved by software/OS updates.

  • Spectre and Meltdown Attacks Against Microprocessors

    "Throw it away and buy a new one" is ridiculous security advice, but it's what US-CERT recommends. It is also unworkable. The problem is that there isn't anything to buy that isn't vulnerable. Pretty much every major processor made in the past 20 years is vulnerable to some flavor of these vulnerabilities. Patching against Meltdown can degrade performance by almost a third. And there's no patch for Spectre; the microprocessors have to be redesigned to prevent the attack, and that will take years. (Here's a running list of who's patched what.)

  • OpenBSD & FreeBSD Are Still Formulating Kernel Plans To Address Meltdown+Spectre

    On Friday DragonFlyBSD's Matthew Dillon already landed his DragonFly kernel fixes for the Meltdown vulnerability affecting Intel CPUs. But what about the other BSDs?

    As outlined in that article yesterday, DragonFlyBSD founder Matthew Dillon quickly worked through better kernel/user separation with their code to address the Intel CPU bug. Similar to Linux, the DragonFlyBSD fix should cause minimal to small CPU performance impact for most workloads while system call heavy / interrupt-heavy workloads (like I/O and databases) could see more significant drops.

  • Retpoline v5 Published For Fending Off Spectre Branch Target Injection

    David Woodhouse of Amazon has sent out the latest quickly-revising patches for introducing the "Retpoline" functionality to the Linux kernel for mitigating the Spectre "variant 2" attack.

    Retpoline v5 is the latest as of Saturday morning as the ongoing effort for avoiding speculative indirect calls within the Linux kernel for preventing a branch target injection style attack. These 200+ lines of kernel code paired with the GCC Retpoline patches are able to address vulnerable indirect branches in the Linux kernel.

    The Retpoline approach is said to only have up to a ~1.5% performance hit when patched... I hope this weekend to get around to trying these kernel and GCC patches on some of my systems for looking at the performance impact in our commonly benchmarked workloads. The Retpoline work is separate from the KPTI page table isolation work for addressing the Intel CPU Meltdown issue.

  • Intel hit with three class-action lawsuits over chip flaws
  • Meltdown, aka "Dear Intel, you suck"

    We have received *no* non-public information. I've seen posts elsewhere by other *BSD people implying that they receive little or no prior warning, so I have no reason to believe this was specific to OpenBSD and/or our philosophy. Personally, I do find it....amusing? that public announcements were moved up after the issue was deduced from development discussions and commits to a different open source OS project. Aren't we all glad that this was under embargo and strongly believe in the future value of embargoes?

  • Hack-proof Quantum Data Encryption

'Chipocalypse'

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Security

Security leftovers

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Security
  • Python-Based Botnet Targets Linux Systems with Exposed SSH Ports

    Experts believe that an experienced cybercrime group has created a botnet from compromised Linux-based systems and is using these servers and devices to mine Monero, a digital currency.

    Crooks are apparently using brute-force attacks against Linux systems that feature exposed SSH ports. If they guess the password, they use Python scripts to install a Monero miner.

  • AMD PSP Affected By Remote Code Execution Vulnerability

    While all eyes have been on Intel this week with the Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities, a disclosure was publicly made this week surrounding AMD's PSP Secure Processor in an unrelated security bulletin.

    AMD's Secure Processor / Platform Security Processor (PSP) that is akin to Intel's Management Engine (ME) is reportedly vulnerable to remote code execution.

  • DragonFlyBSD Lands Fixes For Meltdown Vulnerability

    Linux, macOS, and Windows has taken most of the operating system attention when it comes down to the recently-disclosed Meltdown vulnerability but the BSDs too are prone to this CPU issue. DragonFlyBSD lead developer Matthew Dillon has landed his fixes for Meltdown.

  • Spectre question

    Could ASLR be used to prevent the Spectre attack?

    The way Spectre mitigations are shaping up, it's going to require modification of every program that deals with sensitive data, inserting serialization instructions in the right places. Or programs can be compiled with all branch prediction disabled, with more of a speed hit.

    Either way, that's going to be piecemeal and error-prone. We'll be stuck with a new class of vulnerabilities for a long time. Perhaps good news for the security industry, but it's going to become as tediously bad as buffer overflows for the rest of us.

    Also, so far the mitigations being developed for Spectre only cover branching, but the Spectre paper also suggests the attack can be used in the absence of branches to eg determine the contents of registers, as long as the attacker knows the address of suitable instructions to leverage.

  • Intel Deploying Updates for Spectre and Meltdown Exploits

    Intel reports that company has developed and is rapidly issuing updates for all types of Intel-based computer systems — including personal computers and servers — that render those systems immune from “Spectre” and “Meltdown” exploits reported by Google Project Zero. I

  • Capsule8 Launches Open Source Sensor for Real-time Attack Detection Capable of Detecting Meltdown
  • You know what’s not affected by Meltdown or Spectre? The Raspberry Pi

    One or more of the security vulnerabilities disclosed this week affect nearly every modern smartphone, PC, and server processor. Intel processor are vulnerable to both Meltdown and Spectre attacks. AMD chips are vulnerable to Spectre attacks. And the ARM-based processors that are used in most modern smartphones can fall prey to a Spectre attack as well.

Security: Updates, PyCryptoMiner, and Hardware Crisis

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Security

RISC-V and Raspberry Pi Secure

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Linux
Hardware
Security
  • RISC-V Foundation Trumpets Open-Source ISAs In Wake Of Meltdown, Spectre

    The RISC-V Foundation says that no currently announced RISC-V CPU is vulnerable to Meltdown and Spectre and, in the wake of those bugs, stressed the importance of open-source development and a modern ISA in preventing vulnerabilities.

    In consumer computing, we usually only hear about two instruction set architectures (ISA): x86 and ARM. Classified as a complex instruction set, x86 dominates the desktop and server space. Since the rise of smartphones, however, reduced-instruction-set (RISC) ARM processors have dominated the mobile computing market. Beyond x86, there aren’t many complex instruction sets still in use, but there are still many relevant RISC designs despite ARM’s seeming ubiquity.

    The lesser known RISC-V ISA is among those being developed to take on ARM. It was created in the University of California, Berkeley and is unique because it’s open-source. The ISA is actively being worked on and is now overseen by the RISC-V Foundation, which includes companies such as AMD, Nvidia, Micron, Qualcomm, and Microsoft. An ISA alone doesn’t define a CPU design, though. RISC-V being open-source means that anyone is free to build their own CPU to implement the ISA, or their own compiler to build software that can run on RISC-V CPUs.

  • WHY RASPBERRY PI ISN’T VULNERABLE TO SPECTRE OR MELTDOWN

    Over the last couple of days, there has been a lot of discussion about a pair of security vulnerabilities nicknamed Spectre and Meltdown. These affect all modern Intel processors, and (in the case of Spectre) many AMD processors and ARM cores. Spectre allows an attacker to bypass software checks to read data from arbitrary locations in the current address space; Meltdown allows an attacker to read data from arbitrary locations in the operating system kernel’s address space (which should normally be inaccessible to user programs).

    Both vulnerabilities exploit performance features (caching and speculative execution) common to many modern processors to leak data via a so-called side-channel attack. Happily, the Raspberry Pi isn’t susceptible to these vulnerabilities, because of the particular ARM cores that we use.

    To help us understand why, here’s a little primer on so

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More in Tux Machines

Introducing the potential new Ubuntu Studio Council

Back in 2016, Set Hallström was elected as the new Team Lead for Ubuntu Studio, just in time for the 16.04 Xenial Long Term Support (LTS) release. It was intended that Ubuntu Studio would be able to utilise Set’s leadership skills at least up until the next LTS release in April 2018. Unfortunately, as happens occasionally in the world of volunteer work, Set’s personal circumstances changed and he is no longer able to devote as much time to Ubuntu Studio as he would like. Therefore, an IRC meeting was held between interested Ubuntu Studio contributors on 21st May 2017 to agree on how to fill the void. We decided to follow the lead of Xubuntu and create a Council to take care of Ubuntu Studio, rather than continuing to place the burden of leadership on the shoulder of one particular person. Unfortunately, although the result was an agreement to form the first Ubuntu Studio Council from the meeting participants, we all got busy and the council was never set up. Read more

today's leftovers

  • My Experience with MailSpring on Linux
    On the Linux Desktop, there are quite a few choices for email applications. Each of these has their own pros and cons which should be weighed depending on one’s needs. Some clients will have MS Exchange support. Others do not. In general, because email is reasonably close to free (and yes, we can thank Hotmail for that) it has been a difficult place to make money. Without a cash flow to encourage developers, development has trickled at best.
  • Useful FFMPEG Commands for Managing Audio and Video Files
  • Set Up A Python Django Development Environment on Debian 9 Stretch Linux
  • How To Run A Command For A Specific Time In Linux
  • Kubuntu 17.10 Guide for Newbie Part 7
  •  
  • Why Oppo and Vivo are losing steam in Chinese smartphone market
    China’s smartphone market has seen intense competition over the past few years with four local brands capturing more than 60 percent of sales in 2017. Huawei Technologies, Oppo, Vivo and Xiaomi Technology recorded strong shipment growth on a year-on-year basis. But some market experts warned that Oppo and Vivo may see the growth of their shipments slow this year as users become more discriminating.
  • iPhones Blamed for More than 1,600 Accidental 911 Calls Since October
    The new Emergency SOS feature released by Apple for the iPhone is the one to blame for no less than 1,600 false calls to 911 since October, according to dispatchers. And surprisingly, emergency teams in Elk Grove and Sacramento County in California say they receive at least 20 such 911 calls every day from what appears to be an Apple service center. While it’s not exactly clear why the iPhones that are probably brought in for repairs end up dialing 911, dispatchers told CBS that the false calls were first noticed in the fall of the last year. Apple launched new iPhones in September 2017 and they went on sale later the same month and in November, but it’s not clear if these new devices are in any way related to the increasing number of accidental calls to 911.
  • Game Studio Found To Install Malware DRM On Customers' Machines, Defends Itself, Then Apologizes
    The thin line that exists between entertainment industry DRM software and plain malware has been pointed out both recently and in the past. There are many layers to this onion, ranging from Sony's rootkit fiasco, to performance hits on machines thanks to DRM installed by video games, up to and including the insane idea that copyright holders ought to be able to use malware payloads to "hack back" against accused infringers. What is different in more recent times is the public awareness regarding DRM, computer security, and an overall fear of malware. This is a natural kind of progression, as the public becomes more connected and reliant on computer systems and the internet, they likewise become more concerned about those systems. That may likely explain the swift public backlash to a small game-modding studio seemingly installing something akin to malware in every installation of its software, whether from a legitimate purchase or piracy.

Server: Benchmarks, IBM and Red Hat

  • 36-Way Comparison Of Amazon EC2 / Google Compute Engine / Microsoft Azure Cloud Instances vs. Intel/AMD CPUs
    Earlier this week I delivered a number of benchmarks comparing Amazon EC2 instances to bare metal Intel/AMD systems. Due to interest from that, here is a larger selection of cloud instance types from the leading public clouds of Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud, Microsoft Azure, and Google Compute Engine.
  • IBM's Phil Estes on the Turbulent Waters of Container History
    Phil Estes painted a different picture of container history at Open Source 101 in Raleigh last weekend, speaking from the perspective of someone who had a front row seat. To hear him tell it, this rise and success is a story filled with intrigue, and enough drama to keep a daytime soap opera going for a season or two.
  • Red Hat CSA Mike Bursell on 'managed degradation' and open data
    As part of Red Hat's CTO office chief security architect Mike Bursell has to be informed of security threats past, present and yet to come – as many as 10 years into the future. The open source company has access to a wealth of customers in verticals including health, finance, defence, the public sector and more. So how do these insights inform the company's understanding of the future threat landscape?
  • Red Hat Offers New Decision Management Tech Platform
    Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) has released a platform that will work to support information technology applications and streamline the deployment of rules-based tools in efforts to automate processes for business decision management, ExecutiveBiz reported Thursday.

Vulkan Anniversary and Generic FBDEV Emulation Continues To Be Worked On For DRM Drivers

  • Vulkan Turns Two Years Old, What Do You Hope For Next?
    This last week marked two years since the debut of Vulkan 1.0, you can see our our original launch article. My overworked memory missed realizing it by a few days, but it's been a pretty miraculous two years for this high-performance graphics and compute API.
  • Generic FBDEV Emulation Continues To Be Worked On For DRM Drivers
    Noralf Trønnes has spent the past few months working on generic FBDEV emulation for Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) drivers and this week he volleyed his third revision of these patches, which now includes a new in-kernel API along with some clients like a bootsplash system, VT console, and fbdev implementation.