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Security

NSA Has Legitimate Code Running in Linux

Filed under
Linux
Security

softpedia.com: The National Security Agency or NSA is now in the public eye for some nefarious surveillance, but Linux users should know that the agency also had an active role the Linux kernel development, with the addition of SELinux.

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
Security
  • Mozilla launches massive campaign on digital surveillance
  • Got a PRISM and Boundless Informant problem? Whisper and Tor can help
  • Berlin rejects open source plan, looks to open standards instead
  • TuxRadar Open Ballot: Big Brother

Why we need an Anti-Virus in Linux?

Filed under
Linux
Security

worldofgnome.org: For Free Software fans, malware is considered any non-open source software, like your nVidia or Catalyst proprietary drivers. So for this post I tried Avira Antivirus which isn’t free, to fight the fire with fire, or in my case to fight a malware with a malware Wink

Critical Linux vulnerability imperils users, even after “silent” fix

Filed under
Linux
Security

arstechnica.com: A month after critical bug was quietly fixed, "root" vulnerability persists.

Linux still "benchmark of quality" in this year's Coverity Scan

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Linux
Security

h-online.com: Coverity has called Linux the "benchmark of quality" in its newly published 2012 Coverity Scan Open Source report. Linux 3.8's 7.6 million lines of code has a defect density of .59.

Symantec finds Linux wiper malware

Filed under
Linux
Security

itworld.com: Security vendors analyzing the code used in the cyberattacks against South Korea are finding nasty components designed to wreck infected computers. Tucked inside a piece of Windows malware used in the attacks is a component that erases Linux machines.

Taking Stock of Linux Security and Antivirus Needs

Filed under
Linux
Security

thevarguy.com: Open source fans like to brag that Linux needs no antivirus software. Yet as executives at security vendor ESET were keen to remind me in a recent interview, that truism holds true only to a certain extent.

25 Years of vulnerabilities - Linux has the most

Filed under
Linux
Security

itwire.com: Researchers at Sourcefire have analysed 25 years of vulnerabilities that were reported to CVE and NVD databases and found some interesting results.

Putting enterprise security in place with open source tools

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Security

What's the best way to secure an enterprise network, including both communications and data? No single solution fits all situations, but the practices outlined here mark a solid starting point on which IT departments can build.

Desktop Linux needs anti-virus like a fish needs a bicycle

Filed under
Linux
Security

dontsurfinthenude.blogspot: You don't need an anti-virus program on Linux: I've said it before, but Don't Surf in the Nude started because of an interest in internet security, so I can't resist trying out anti-virus programs in Linux.

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