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Security

Red Hat: Security Makes Paying for Open Source Software Worth It

Filed under
Red Hat
Security

Open source software vendors do something akin to selling air: They get people to pay for something that easily, and perfectly legally, can be had for free. But added security is becoming an increasingly important part of the value proposition, as Red Hat (RHT), maker of one of the leading Linux enterprise distributions, emphasized this week in a statement on its software subscriptions.

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Disk Encryption Tests On Fedora 21

Filed under
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Security

If you've been wondering about the impact of enabling full-disk encryption when doing a fresh install of Fedora 21, here's some reference benchmarks comparing the Anaconda option of this latest Fedora Linux release.

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VIDEO: Interview with ESET about Windigo & Advanced Linux Server-Side Threats

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

iTWire interviews ESET Malware Researcher Olivier Bilodeau, on his way to be one of the speakers at the 2015 Linux.conf.au conference, presenting on advanced Linux server-side threats.

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Tails 1.2.3 is out

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security
Debian

On January 3rd, the SSL certificate of our website hosting provider, boum.org, expired. This means that if you still are running Tails 1.2.1 or older, you will not get any update notification. Please help spreading the word!

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Under the hood of I2P, the Tor alternative that reloaded Silk Road

Filed under
OSS
Security

Tor is apparently no longer a safe place to run a marketplace for illegal goods and services. With the alleged operator of the original Silk Road marketplace, Ross Ulbricht, now going to trial, the arrest of his alleged successor and a number of others in a joint US-European law enforcement operation, and the seizure of dozens of servers that hosted "hidden services" on the anonymizing network, the operators of the latest iteration of Silk Road have packed their tents and moved to a new territory: the previously low-profile I2P anonymizing network.

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Update on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and FIPS 140 validations

Filed under
Red Hat
Security

Red Hat achieved its latest successful FIPS 140 validation back in April 2013. Since then, a lot has happened. There have been well publicized attacks on cryptographic protocols, weaknesses in implementations, and changing government requirements. With all of these issues in play, we want to explain what we are doing about it.

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Also: Mysteries of NUMA Memory Management Revealed

Here is How I Built my First RPM

Exiv2 Vulnerability Closed in Ubuntu 14.10

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

Canonical has published details in a security notice about a Exiv2 vulnerability in Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) that has been found and corrected. This not a major issue, but users should upgrade nonetheless.

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Fedora 22 Might Disable Root Remote Logins By Default

Filed under
Red Hat
Security

Right now Fedora allows for SSH log-ins as root, which is the default behavior as currently shipped by sshd. However, for Fedora 22 there is a proposal that the packaged sshd will default the option of PermitRootLogin to no so that root log-ins wouldn't be permitted into Fedora SSH servers. This change is being proposed to try to avoid brute-force attacks against root passwords of Fedora servers.

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Will Open Source Security Be on the Federal Agenda in 2015?

Filed under
OSS
Security

Open source code security has been in the spotlight since the Heartbleed bug infected the Canada Revenue Agency website last year. Found embedded in OpenSSL, one of the Web’s most common security systems, Heartbleed sent public-sector IT personnel scrambling to test their agencies’ websites to make sure they were clean and protected.

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Heads up, dear leader: Security hole found in North Korea’s home-grown OS

Filed under
Linux
Security

North Korea is a technological island in many ways. Almost all of the country's "Internet" is run as a private network, with all connections to the greater global Internet through a collection of proxies. And the majority of the people of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea who have access to that network rely on the country's official operating system: a Linux variant called Red Star OS.

Red Star OS, first introduced in 2003, was originally derived from Red Hat Linux. In theory, it gave North Korea an improved level of security against outside attack—a Security Enhanced Linux operating system based on Red Hat that could enforce strict government access controls on the few who got to use it.

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More in Tux Machines

Android-powered BlackBerry Venice with a slide-out keyboard reportedly headed to AT&T

Reports from earlier this month that BlackBerry would soon launch a full fledged Android-powered smartphone are looking up. Ex-tipster who still occasionally tips/confirms new devices @Evleaks tweeted earlier today that a device called the BlackBerry Venice is headed to AT&T later this year. He specifically mentioned that this device would be powered by Android and that — here’s the best part — it will feature a slide-out physical keyboard for QWERTY fans. Read more

Top 5 Android phones — July 2015

Then we have our wild cards, two phones are included this quarter, and both deserve some sort of mention. One isn’t available yet, while the other is about to receive a much anticipated successor. Without further ado, let’s dive into the top 5 Android smartphones for July 2015. And please, as always, keep in mind that these are in no particular order; each phone has plenty of pros and cons. Read more

Linux Kernel Gets a Patch for Dell Airplane Mode Switch

A patch has been submitted to the Linux kernel to fix a problem that was really bothering the users of Dell laptops, and that's the ability to use the airplane mode switch. Read more

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