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Security

FreeNAS 9.10 Open-Source Storage Operating System Adds USB 3.0 & Skylake Support

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Security
BSD

Jordan Hubbard from the FreeNAS project, an open-source initiative to create a powerful, free, secure, and reliable NAS (Network-attached storage) operating system based on BSD technologies, announced the release of FreeNAS 9.10.

FreeNAS 9.10 is the tenth maintenance release in the current stable 9.x series of the project, thus bringing the latest security patches from upstream, support for new devices, as well as several under-the-hood updates. As expected, FreeNAS 9.10 has been rebased on the latest FreeBSD 10.3 RC3 (Release Candidate) release.

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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Security advisories for Monday
  • Cryptostalker, a Tool to Detect Crypto-Ransomware on Linux

    A while back, we stumbled upon an interesting GitHub repo dubbed randumb, which included an example called Cryptostalker, advertised as a tool to detect crypto-ransomware on Linux.

    Cryptostalker and the original project randumb are the work of Sean Williams, a developer from San Francisco. Mr. Williams wanted to create a tool that monitored the filesystem for newly written files, and if the files contained random data, the sign of encrypted content, and they were written at high speed, it would alert the system's owner.

  • Google slings critical patch at exploited Linux kernel root hole

    Google has shipped an out-of-band patch for Android shuttering a bug that is under active exploitation to root devices.

    The vulnerability (CVE-2015-1805) affects all Android devices running Linux kernel versions below 3.18.

  • Everything is fine, nothing to see here!

    Today everyone who is REALLY, I mean REALLY REALLY good at security got there through blood sweat and tears. Nobody taught them what they know, they learned it on their own. Many of us didn't have training when we were learning these things. Regardless of this though, if training is fantastic, why does it seem there is a constant march toward things getting worse instead of better? That tells me we're not teaching the right skills to the right people. The skills of yesterday don't help you today, and especially don't help tomorrow. By its very definition, training can only cover the topics of yesterday.

  • Inside the Starburst-sized box that could save the Internet

    Cybercrime is costing us millions. Hacks drain the average American firm of $15.4 million per year, and, in the resulting panic, companies often spend more than $1.9 million to resolve a single attack. It’s time to face facts: Our defenses aren’t strong enough to keep the hackers out.

  • Utah’s Online Caucus Gives Security Experts Heart Attacks

    On Tuesday, registered Republicans in Utah who want to participate in their state’s caucus will have the option to either head to a polling station and cast a vote in person or log onto a new website and choose their candidate online. To make this happen, the Utah GOP paid more than $80,000 to the London-based company Smartmatic, which manages electronic voting systems and internet voting systems in 25 countries and will run the Utah GOP caucus system.

Security Leftovers

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Security

Snowden: “I Used Free And Open Source Software Like Debian And TOR. I Didn’t Trust Microsoft”

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GNU
Linux
Security
Debian

At the Free Software Foundation’s LibrePlanet2016 conference on Saturday, NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden participated in a discussion regarding free software and security. He joined the talk via video conferencing from Russia.

Edward Snowden told that he was able to disclose the secrets of American government and its projects of mass surveillance using free software. The event was being held in an MIT lecture hall and this statement drew a wide round of applause.

Praising the likes of Debian, Tails, and TOR, he said — “What happened in 2013 couldn’t have happened without free software.”

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Also: OS X and Linux rise in developer market to threaten Windows

Antivirus Live CD 17.0-0.99.1 Uses ClamAV 0.99.1 to Clean Your PCs of Viruses

Filed under
Linux
Security

4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki today informs Softpedia about the immediate availability for download of a new build of his Antivirus Live CD tool based on the latest 4MLinux and ClamAV projects.

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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Leopard Flower firewall – Protect your bytes

    Several months ago, I decided to explore a somewhat obscure topic of outbound per-application firewall control in Linux. A concept that Windows users are well familiar with, it’s been around for ages, providing Windows folks with a heightened sense of – if not practical factual – protection against rogues residing in their system and trying to phone home.

    In Linux, things are a little different, but with the growing flux of Windows converts arriving at the sandy shores of open-source, the notion of need for outbound control of applications has also risen, giving birth to software designed to allay fears if not resolve problems. My first attempt to play with Leopard Flower and Douane was somewhat frustrating. Now, I’m going to revisit the test, focusing only on the former.

    [...]

    Leopard Flower firewall is an interesting concept. Misplaced, though, for most parts. It caters to a Windows need that does not exist on Linux, and to be frank, has no place in the Microsoft world either. Then, it also tries to resolve a problem of control and knowledge by requiring the user to exercise the necessary control and knowledge. But if they had those to begin with, they wouldn’t need to dabble in per-application firewalls. Furthermore, the software is still fairly immature. There are at least half a dozen little things and changes that can be implemented to make lpfw more elegant, starting with installation and followed by service and GUI model, prompts, robustness, and a few others.

  • Critical bug in libotr could open users of ChatSecure, Adium, Pidgin to compromise
  • Clair 1.0 Brings Advances in Container Security

    CoreOS pushes the open-source container security project to the 1.0 milestone and production stability.
    As container use grows, there is an increasing need to understand from a security perspective what is actually running in a container. That's the goal of CoreOS' Clair container security project, which officially hits the 1.0 milestone today, in an effort to help organizations validate container application security.

Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Friday's security updates
  • At pwn2Own, Chrome, Flash and Other Key Tools Proved Vulnerable
  • Motor Vehicles Increasingly Vulnerable to Remote Exploits

    As previously reported by the media in and after July 2015, security researchers evaluating automotive cybersecurity were able to demonstrate remote exploits of motor vehicles. The analysis demonstrated the researchers could gain significant control over vehicle functions remotely by exploiting wireless communications vulnerabilities. While the identified vulnerabilities have been addressed, it is important that consumers and manufacturers are aware of the possible threats and how an attacker may seek to remotely exploit vulnerabilities in the future. Third party aftermarket devices with Internet or cellular access plugged into diagnostics ports could also introduce wireless vulnerabilities.

  • Malvertising hits BBC, Newsweek, NYT and MSN

    Links to malware inside online advertising bypassed the security systems of the advertising serving companies and distributed ransomware to unsuspecting ‘link clickers’.

    Earlier this week major websites including BBC, Newsweek, New York Times and MSN ‘hosted’ malvertising on their sites that has been credited as the largest of attack of its type for two years. Previously Google’s DoubleClick and Zedo ad servers were ‘infected’ and YouTube, Amazon and Yahoo websites used advertisements served from them.

    Although ad serving networks try to filter out malicious ones, occasionally altered ones’ slip in. On a high-traffic site, this means a large pool of potential victims. Websites that serve the ads are usually unaware of the problem.

    AppNexus, one of the ad servers said it has an anti-malware detection system called Sherlock it uses to screen ads and also uses a filtering product from a third-party vendor. "We devote considerable financial resources to safeguarding our customers. Unfortunately, bad actors also invest considerably in developing new forms of malware,” said Josh Zeitz, vice president of communications.

  • Security Researcher Goes Missing After Investigating Bangladesh Bank Cyber-Heist

    Tanvir Hassan Zoha, 34, security researcher, has gone missing just days after accusing Bangladesh's central bank officials of negligence, which facilitated the theft of over $81 million from the country's oversea accounts.

Linux Kernel 3.12.57 LTS Out Now with ALSA, EFI, and Xen Improvements, Bugfixes

Filed under
Linux
Security

On March 18, 2016, kernel developer Jiri Slaby announced the release of the fifty-seventh maintenance build of the long-term supported Linux 3.12 kernel series.

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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Locky Ransomware Spreading in Massive Spam Attack

    Trustwave said over the last seven days, malware-laced spam has represented 18 percent of total spam collected in its honeypots. Trustwave said malware-infected spam typically represent less than 2 percent of total spam. The recent increase to 18 percent is almost entirely traced to ransomware JavaScript downloaders. Campaigns aren’t continuous, Trustwave reported, but are delivered in hour-long bursts.

  • Considering Docker? Consider Security First

    Containers started making a big splash in IT and dev operations starting in 2014. The benefits of flexibility and go-live times, among many others, are almost undeniable. But large enterprises considering using a container platform for development or IT operations should pause and consider security first.

Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Big-name sites hit by rash of malicious ads spreading crypto ransomware [Updated]

    Mainstream websites, including those published by The New York Times, the BBC, MSN, and AOL, are falling victim to a new rash of malicious ads that attempt to surreptitiously install crypto ransomware and other malware on the computers of unsuspecting visitors, security firms warned.

    The tainted ads may have exposed tens of thousands of people over the past 24 hours alone, according to a blog post published Monday by Trend Micro. The new campaign started last week when "Angler," a toolkit that sells exploits for Adobe Flash, Microsoft Silverlight, and other widely used Internet software, started pushing laced banner ads through a compromised ad network.

    According to a separate blog post from Trustwave's SpiderLabs group, one JSON-based file being served in the ads has more than 12,000 lines of heavily obfuscated code. When researchers deciphered the code, they discovered it enumerated a long list of security products and tools it avoided in an attempt to remain undetected.

  • VMware fixes XSS flaws in vRealize for Linux

    VMware patched two cross-site scripting issues in several editions of its vRealize cloud software. These flaws could be exploited in stored XSS attacks and could result in the user's workstation being compromised.

  • VMware patches severe XSS flaws in vRealize software

    VMware has patched two serious vulnerabilities in the firm's vRealize software which could lead to remote code execution and the compromise of business workstations.

    In a security advisory posted on Tuesday, the Palo Alto, California-based firm said the "important" vulnerabilities are found within the VMware vRealize Automation and VMware vRealize Business Advanced and Enterprise software platforms.

  • Get ready to patch Git servers, clients – nasty-looking bugs surface

    A chap who found two serious security bugs in Git servers and clients has urged people to patch their software.

    The flaws are present in Git including the 2.x, 1.9 and 1.7 branches, meaning the vulnerabilities have been lurking in the open-source version control tool for years.

    It is possible these two programming blunders can be potentially exploited to corrupt memory or execute malicious code on remote servers and clients. To do so, an attacker would have to craft a Git repository with a tree of files that have extremely long filenames, and then push the repo to a vulnerable server or let a vulnerable client clone it from the internet.

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FOSS in 3D Printing

  • Open source wifi enabled 3D printer controller Franklin speeds up with new release
    3D printing hit the mainstream a few years ago thanks in part to the open-source 3D printer market. The origins of this transition had to do with expiring patents held by the traditionally held commercial 3D printing companies. Since then, several small businesses have sprung up around the emerging low-cost 3D printer market. Some of these companies embraced the open-source mentality, while others are seeking shelter with patents.
  • Hackaday Prize Entry: Open-Source Myoelectric Hand Prosthesis
    Hands can grab things, build things, communicate, and we control them intuitively with nothing more than a thought. To those who miss a hand, a prosthesis can be a life-changing tool for carrying out daily tasks. We are delighted to see that [Alvaro Villoslada] joined the Hackaday Prize with his contribution to advanced prosthesis technology: Dextra, the open-source myoelectric hand prosthesis.
  • BCN3D Technologies releases open source files for BCN3D Sigma 3D printer
    As our readers will know, an important part of the 3D printing community is the idea of accessibility. Of course, it is more than just an idea, as everyday makers around the world share their 3D designs and models for free, and even 3D printing companies exercise an open-source philosophy with DIY 3D printers and accessible models. Recently, Barcelona based 3D printer developer BCN3D Technologies decided to further embrace the additive manufacturing open-source philosophy with their latest initiative, Open Source 360º. As part of the initiative, the company has announced that it will share all of its engineering, design, and fabrication information used in the manufacturing of their flagship product, the BCN3D Sigma 3D printer.
  • Shellmo: Aquatic 3D printed robot for fun and education
    Recently I came across a very interesting open hardware project called Shellmo. What caught my eye was that it's a 3D printed crustacean that seems to have no apparent real world use, though with a little creativity I can see educational implications. Shellmo is a unique, almost cartoon-like creatures that could captivate the imagination of children while at the same time affording them an opportunity to 3D print their own robot. With the current emphasis on STEM in education, Shellmo appears to be the kind of project that would stimulate student interest.

LibreOffice Liberation

  • Sun, sea, and open source: How Spain's Balearic islands are trying to turn into a tech paradise
    However, work remains to be done, especially on civil servants' desktops. "We started by replacing MSN Office", explains Villoslada. "Thanks to free office suite LibreOffice 5, we may overcome compatibility problems with documents coming in from different versions of MSN Office. We already have 1,000 Office licenses which are not necessary anymore, and we plan not to renew over 5,500 licenses purchased in 2007", he adds.
  • The Document Liberation Project: What we do
    While The Document Foundation is best known for LibreOffice, it also backs the Document Liberation Project. But what exactly is that? We’ve made a short video to explain all…

Kali Linux Alternative: BackBox Linux 4.6 Released With Updated Hacking Tools

BackBox Linux, a Kali Linux alternative, is here with its latest version i.e. BackBox Linux 4.6. Based on Ubuntu Linux, this hacking operating system is now available for download with updated hacking tools and Ruby 2.2. Read more

Chromebook and GNU/Linux

  • Turn Your Old Laptop into a Chromebook
    Once the drive is ready with bootable CloudReady, plug it into the target PC and boot the system. It may take a while for the system to boot into Chromium OS. Once booted, you will see the screen shown in Figure 3.
  • Running Linux and Chrome OS Together Using Crouton
    Leo Laporte is a longtime technology commentator and also the host of the show “The Screen Savers,” on the TWiT Netcast Network. In this video he explains how to install Linux on a Chromebook using Crouton, an open source tool developed by Google employee David Schneider.