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Security

Tails 1.1 Beta 1 Secure Distro Now Has Windows 8 Comouflage Mode

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security
Debian

Tails is a distribution based on Debian and Tor technologies that aims to keep its users as anonymous as possible. It gained a lot more visibility after Edward Snowden said that he used exactly this Linux distribution to hide his tracks. The developers are now implementing more changes and fixes that should ensure it becomes even more secure.

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TrueCrypt Not Dead, Forked and Relocated to Switzerland

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Security

The development of TrueCrypt, an open source piece of software used for on-the-fly encryption, has been terminated and users have been advised not to use it because it is not secure enough. Now, it seems that another team of developers have forked the software and rebased it in Switzerland.

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Kali Linux 1.0.7 review

Filed under
Reviews
Security

The latest update to Kali Linux was released a few days ago. Kali Linux 1.0.7 review is a summary review of the main features of this latest upgrade to the security distribution from Offensive Security, a security and penetration training outfit based somewhere on this third rock from the Sun.

The main feature introduced in Kali Linux 1.0.7 is the ability to transfer the system to a USB stick with encrypted persistence.

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The Linux Foundation’s Core Infrastructure Initiative Announces New Backers, First Projects to Receive Support and Advisory Board Members

Filed under
Linux
Security

The Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII), a project hosted by The Linux Foundation that enables technology companies, industry stakeholders and esteemed developers to collaboratively identify and fund open source projects that are in need of assistance, today announced five new backers, the first projects to receive funding from the Initiative and the Advisory Board members who will help identify critical infrastructure projects most in need of support.

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Hands-on with Kali Linux 1.0.7

Filed under
Linux
Security

One last thing about booting Kali Linux. The details of this are beyond the scope of this kind of general Linux blog, but one of the major advances in this release is support for Encrypted USB Persistence. This is specifically for people who will be booting Kali from a USB stick, it gives them the possibility to securely save changes to an encrypted partition on the USB drive. I haven't had time to look at this in detail yet, much less actually try it out, but at first glance I think it probably removes one of the major reasons for carrying a dedicated laptop around for security analysis, rather than just a Live USB stick.

So there you have it, short and very sweet. If you are interested in network security, forensic analysis or penetration testing, this is a Linux distribution you need to know about. If you're already using it, just make sure that you pick up the latest updates so that you get the new kernel and tools.

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BackTrack Successor Kali Linux 1.0.7 Arrives with Linux Kernel 3.14

Filed under
Linux
Security

As usually, Kali Linux 1.0.7 features various new tools, updated applications, as well as numerous fixes in order to make Kali Linux a more stable and reliable Linux operating system. This includes a new version of the Linux kernel, among other things.

There are numerous Linux distributions in the open source ecosystem, but there are very few built specifically for penetration testing and digital forensics. The former iteration of this distro, BackTrack, is one of the most downloaded OSes and it's the go-to operating system when you need a professional solution.

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Meet the Man Hired to Make Sure the Snowden Docs Aren't Hacked

Filed under
Linux
Security

When he got to Rio, Lee spent one entire day strengthening Greenwald’s computer, which at that point used Windows 8. Lee was worried spy agencies could break in, so he replaced the operating system with Linux, installed a firewall, disk encryption and miscellaneous software to make it more secure.

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Notable Penetration Test Linux distributions of 2014

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

A penetration test, or the short form pentest, is an attack on a computer system with the intention of finding security weaknesses, potentially gaining access to it, its functionality and data. A Penetration Testing Linux is a special built Linux distro that can be used for analyzing and evaluating security measures of a target system.

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Silent Circle secures $30 million in funding to expand Blackphone production

Filed under
Android
Security

Private communications firm Silent Circle has secured $30 million in funding to cope with demand for the privacy-based Blackphone, as well as expand operations globally.

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Security's future belongs to open source

Filed under
OSS
Security

The proof that open source, properly applied, is available. Studies, such as the one recently done by Coverity, have found that open-source programs have fewer errors per thousand lines of code than its proprietary brothers. And, it's hard to ignore the Communications-Electronics Security Group (CESG), the group within the UK Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) that assesses operating systems and software for security issues, when they said that that while no end-user operating system is as secure as they'd like it to be, Ubuntu 12.04 is the most secure desktop.

On the other hand, the mere existence of Microsoft's monthly Patch Tuesday says everything most of us need to know about how "secure" proprietary software is. I also can't help noticing how every time Microsoft releases a new version of Internet Explorer (IE), they always claim it's the most secure ever. And, then, a new hole is found, and guess what, that same security hole is in every version of IE from IE 6 to IE 11. If IE really were being rewritten to make it secure why are the same holes showing up In Every Version??

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More in Tux Machines

Android Wear Gets Its First Big Update

Google's Android Wear on Thursday got its first major update, bringing GPS support and offline music capabilities to the wearables platform. "Android Wear is great for tracking things like route, distance and speed," wrote Kenny Stoltz, Android Wear product manager. "Before today, you had to keep your phone close at hand. Starting today, Wear supports watches with GPS sensors, so you can enjoy these features regardless of where your phone's at." Read more

Positive results from Outreach Program for Women

In 2013, Debian participated in both rounds of the GNOME Outreach Program for Women (OPW). The first round was run in conjunction with GSoC and the second round was a standalone program. The publicity around these programs and the strength of the Google and Debian brands attracted a range of female candidates, many of whom were shortlisted by mentors after passing their coding tests and satisfying us that they had the capability to complete a project successfully. As there are only a limited number of places for GSoC and limited funding for OPW, only a subset of these capable candidates were actually selected. The second round of OPW, for example, was only able to select two women. Read more

Mesa 10.3.2 Has A Couple Bug-Fixes

For those living by stable Mesa releases rather than the exciting, bleeding-edge Mesa Git code for open-source Linux graphics drivers, Mesa 10.3.2 is available this Friday night. Mesa 10.3.2 has fixes for Nouveauy's GM107 Maxwell and GK110 support, a handful of Intel DRI driver fixes, and also a few R600g/RadeonSI driver fixes. Mesa stable users interested in learning more can find the 10.3.2 release announcement by Emil Velikov, the new Mesa release manager. For those after the latest Git developments, Mesa 10.4 will be declared stable in December. Read more

openSUSE Tumbling, Fedora Slipping, and Calculating Linux

The big news today is the merger of openSUSE Factory and Tumbleweed. Fedora 21 is delayed again due to numerous blockers. Jack M. Germain looks at Calculate Linux 14 and Bryan Lunduke is back with another desktop review, this week LXDE. There's a "victory for free software" in the news, but it's not in Berlin where Microsoft Office is being substituted for OpenOffice. Read more