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Security

Security Leftovers

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Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Customer security awareness: alerting you to vulnerabilities that are of real risk
  • Cisco's WikiLeaks Security Vulnerability Exposure: 10 Things Partners Need To Know

    Cisco's security team has discovered that hundreds of its networking devices contain a vulnerability that could allow attackers to remotely executive malicious code and take control of the affected device.

    "We are committed to responsible disclosure, protecting our customers, and building the strongest security architecture and products that are designed through our Trustworthy Systems initiatives," said a Cisco spokesperson in an email to CRN regarding the vulnerability.

    Some channel partners of the San Jose, Calif.-based networking giant are already advising customers on how to bypass the critical security flaw. Here are 10 important items that Cisco channel partners should know about the security vulnerability.

  • Linux had a killer flaw for 11 years and no one noticed

    One of the key advantages of Open sauce software is that it is supposed to be easier to spot and fix software flaws, however Linux has had a local privilege escalation flaw for 11 years and no-one has noticed.

    The vulnerability, tracked as CVE-2017-6074, is over 11 years old and was likely introduced in 2005 when the Linux kernel gained support for the Datagram Congestion Control Protocol (DCCP). It was discovered last week and was patched by the kernel developers on Friday.

  • 6 Hot Internet of Things (IoT) Security Technologies
  • Microsoft Losing Its Edge

    However, despite these improvements in code cleanness and security technologies, it hasn’t quite proven itself when faced with experienced hackers at contests such as Pwn2Own. At last year’s edition of Pwn2Own, Edge proved to be a little better than Internet Explorer and Safari, but it still ended up getting hacked twice, while Chrome was only partially hacked once.

    Things seem to have gotten worse, rather than better, for Edge. At this year’s Pwn2Own, Microsoft’s browser was hacked no less than five times.

  • Microsoft loses the Edge at hacking contest

    And for every hack perpetrated against Edge, there was a corresponding attack against the Windows 10 kernel, indicating that it has a way to go in terms of security, according to Tom's Hardware.

  • Wikileaks: Apple, Microsoft and Google must fix CIA exploits within 90 days

    The 90-day deadline is the same that Google's own Project Zero security group provides to companies when it uncovers flaws in their software. If a company has failed to patch its software accordingly, Project Zero publishes details of the flaw whether the vendor likes it or not.

  • NTPsec Project announces 0.9.7

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Reproducible Builds: week 99 in Stretch cycle
  • Government Agencies to be Rated on Cybersecurity Using NIST Framework

    The Trump administration has announced that it will impose new metrics on federal agencies related to cybersecurity. Agencies and departments will be required to comply with the framework developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and report back to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and the White House.

    Homeland security advisor Thomas Bossert stated that the President’s budget will include an increase in federal funding to combat cyber threats, and that the administration’s priorities vis-à-vis cybersecurity are to modernize and centralize the existing system. To this end, the Administration intends to partner with business, including Silicon Valley, and state and local governments, on cybersecurity.

  • Firefox gets complaint for labeling unencrypted login page insecure

    The operator of a website that accepts subscriber logins only over unencrypted HTTP pages has taken to Mozilla's Bugzilla bug-reporting service to complain that the Firefox browser is warning that the page isn't suitable for the transmission of passwords.

    "Your notice of insecure password and/or log-in automatically appearing on the log-in for my website, Oil and Gas International, is not wanted and was put there without our permission," a person with the user name dgeorge wrote here (the link was made private shortly after this post went live). "Please remove it immediately. We have our own security system, and it has never been breached in more than 15 years. Your notice is causing concern by our subscribers and is detrimental to our business."

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Monday
  • Old Linux kernel security bug bites

    OK, hands up, who knows what High-Level Data Link Control (HDLC) is? It's an archaic networking data framing protocol that's used in modems, X.25, frame-relay, ISDN, and other now uncommon networking technologies. I know it because I used to work with them back in the day. You'll get to know it now because a researcher discovered a security hole hidden within the Linux kernel driver that implements it.

  • Seven year-old Linux vulnerability now patched

    An old vulnerability was just discovered in the Linux kernel, potentially allowing hackers to gain privilege escalation, or cause a denial of service. The vulnerability was quickly fixed and there have been no signs of it in the wild, although that does not necessarily mean it went unnoticed.

  • OpenSSH 7.5 released

    OpenSSH 7.5 has just been released. It will be available from the mirrors listed at http://www.openssh.com/ shortly.

  • OpenSSH 7.5 Has Security Fixes, Removes OpenSSL 1.0 Support for Portable OpenSSH

    OpenSSH, the cross-platform and open-source 100% complete SSH 2.0 protocol implementation offering both SFTP server and client support was updated today to version 7.5.

    OpenSSH 7.5 comes three months after the release of OpenSSH 7.4 in late December 2016, and promises to be a maintenance update that addresses two important security issues, implements support for the "=-" syntax to make removing of methods from algorithm lists a lot easier, and fix numerous reported bugs.

  • Is Linux Mint a secure distribution?

    Linux Mint has been lambasted by some in the media for security problems over the last few years. But how accurate are such perceptions? Does Linux Mint really suffer from security problems or is it all much ado about nothing?

    A writer at DistroWatch wades into the controversy and examines some of the myths and misunderstandings about Linux Mint and security.

  • Linux Mint's security record

    Some of the more common misunderstandings I have encountered recently have involved the Linux Mint distribution. Mint has been a popular project in recent years and, with many people using the distribution and talking about the project, there is bound to be some mis-communication. In particular, most of the rumours and misunderstandings I have encountered have revolved around Mint's security practises and history. I would like to clear up a few of the more common rumours.

  • Mozilla Firefox is the First Pwn2own 2017 Victim to be Patched

    Some vendors respond to security issues faster than others. Last week, the 10th annual Pwn2own hacking challenge was hosted by Trend Micro's Zero Day Initiative (ZDI), with multiple groups of researchers taking aim at web browsers, operating systems and virtualization technology.

    Mozilla's Firefox web browser was successfully exploited on March 16, the second day of the Pwn2own event. Researchers from Chaitin Security Research Lab were the only group to attack Mozilla Firefox, and earned $30,000 for demonstrating a new zero-day exploit. The day the exploit was demonstrated, the only thing publicly revealed about the exploit is that it made use of an integer overflow flaw in combination with an uninitialized memory buffer in the Windows kernel.

Tails 3.0 Anonymous LiveCD Gets Third Beta Release with Important Security Fixes

Filed under
Security
Debian

The developers of the Tails amnesic incognito live system announced the availability of the third Beta release of the upcoming major Tails 3.0 operating system, which will be based on the soon-to-be-released Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" OS.

Read more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • More than 300 Cisco switch models vulnerable to CIA hack

    A cache of CIA documents was dropped on the internet two weeks ago via WikiLeaks. It was a huge volume of data, some of which detailed CIA tools for breaking into smartphones and even smart TVs. Now, Cisco has said its examination of the documents points to a gaping security hole in more than 300 models of its switches. There’s no patch for this critical vulnerability, but it’s possible to mitigate the risk with some settings changes.

    Cisco’s security arm sent out an advisory on Friday alerting customers that the IOS and IOS XE Software Cluster were vulnerable to hacks based on the leaked documents. The 318 affected switch models are mostly in the Catalyst series, but there are also some embedded systems and IE-series switches on the list. These are enterprise devices that cost a few thousand dollars at least. So, nothing in your house is affected by this particular attack.

  • Assange chastises companies who haven't responded to CIA vulnerability offers

    Wikileaks head Julian Assange slammed companies not taking the site up on the sites offer to share security flaws the CIA had exploited in their products.

    In a screen-shot statement tweeted on Saturday, Wikileaks noted that "Organizations such as Mozilla" had responded to the site's emails offering unreleased security vulnerabilities from leaked CIA files. "Google and other companies" had not.

    "Most of these lagging companies have conflicts of interest due to their classified work with US government agencies. In practice such associations limit industry staff with US security clearances from fixing holes based on leaked information from the CIA. Should such companies choose to not secure their users against CIA or NSA attacks users may prefer organizations such as Mozilla or European companies that prioritize their users over government contracts," the statement read.

    Wikileaks recently published a trove of files leaked from the CIA, including descriptions of hacking techniques. The site made an effort to redact source code showing how to actually accomplish the techniques, although enough code slipped through the cracks for researchers to reverse engineer at least one of the security flaws.

  • Gentoo: 201703-02 Adobe Flash Player: Multiple vulnerabilities

OpenSSH 7.5 released

Filed under
OSS
Security

OpenSSH 7.5 has just been released. It will be available from the
mirrors listed at http://www.openssh.com/ shortly.

OpenSSH is a 100% complete SSH protocol 2.0 implementation and
includes sftp client and server support. OpenSSH also includes
transitional support for the legacy SSH 1.3 and 1.5 protocols
that may be enabled at compile-time.

Read more

Also: OpenSSH 7.5 Released, Legacy Crypto Functions Still Heading For Retirement

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Hire a DDoS service to take down your enemies

    According to Neustar, almost three quarters of all global brands, organizations and companies have been victims of a DDoS attack. And more than 3,700 DDoS attacks occur each day.

  • Apollo Lake 3.5-incher doubles down on security

    Kontron’s Linux-friendly, Intel Apollo Lake based “3.5″-SBC-APL” SBC features triple display support, a TPM 2.0 chip, and optional security services.

  • Leading Linux distros dawdle as kernel flaw persists

    A local privilege esclation flaw has been fixed in the Linux kernel, but several upstream distributions have yet to release updates. Administrators should plan on mitigating the vulnerability on Linux servers and workstations themselves and monitor the distributions for their update plans.

How to secure your Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Security

The Raspberry Pi and many other inexpensive computer boards like it have become part of the "Internet of Things" or IoT revolution. Internet-connected computing devices have emerged beyond traditional servers, desktops, laptops, and mobile devices. Now your TV, DVR (digital video recorder), thermostat, refrigerator, Internet radio, Raspberry Pi, and other devices are on the network too.

IoT has been huge for experimentation and innovation. But as projects get rushed to completion, there have been severe consequences for ignoring security. And this applies both to commercial products and hobby projects. I'll talk about the Raspberry Pi specifically in this article, so this post is oriented more toward do-it-yourself projects.

Read more

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Some HTTPS inspection tools might weaken security [iophk: "the death of web-mail UI"]

    In a typical enterprise environment, an HTTPS connection can even be intercepted and re-encrypted multiple times: at the network perimeter by gateway security products or data leak prevention systems and on endpoint systems by antivirus programs that need to inspect such traffic for malware.

    The problem is that users' browsers no longer get to validate the real server certificates because that task falls to the interception proxy. And as it turns out, security products are pretty bad at validating server certificates.

  • Defence against the Dark Arts involves controlling your hardware

    In light of the Vault 7 documents leak (and the rise to power of Lord Voldemort this year), it might make sense to rethink just how paranoid we need to be.

  • This laptop-bricking USB stick just got even more dangerous

    Remember that USB stick that would destroy almost anything in its path, from laptops, photo booths, kiosks, to even cars?

    Now there's a new version, and it's even more dangerous than before.

    In case you missed it the first time around, a Hong Kong-based company built a weaponized pocket-sized USB stick, which when plugged into a device, will rapidly charge its capacitors from the USB power supply and then discharge, frying the affected device's circuits.

  • Docker Image Vulnerability Research

    Managing known vulnerabilities is the first step towards a strong security posture. If we’re not updating our systems, and keeping an eye on emerging vulnerabilities that are yet to be patched upstream, we’re basically leaving the front door wide open.

Linux Security

Filed under
Security
  • Why Codethink is a founding member of the Civil Infrastructure Platform, a Linux Foundation initiative

    On April 4th 2016 a new Linux Foundation initiative called the Civil Infrastructure Platform was announced. CIP aims to share efforts around building a Linux-based commodity platform for industrial grade products that need to be maintained for anything between 25 and 50 years - in some cases even longer. Codethink is one of the founding members.

  • Ubuntu 12.04 Will Be End-Of-Life in April 28th 2017 & ESM Surprise
  • Update Shyness

    But the update madness had just started. A couple days after the PCLOS incident, I booted OpenMandriva and Discover notified me that there were updates. I must confess that the update process in OpenMandriva has not been easy for me: I prefer to use the Control Center, but sometimes it cannot install some packages and those have to be installed with Discover. Sometimes, the latter simply refuses to load the package list.

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Security Leftovers

  • How To Improve The Linux System’s Security Using Firejail
    As you already know, Linux kernel is secure by default. But, it doesn’t mean that the softwares on the Linux system are completely secure. Say for example, there is a possibility that any add-ons on your web browser may cause some serious security issues. While doing financial transactions over internet, some key logger may be active in browser which you are not aware of. Even though, we can’t completely give the bullet-proof security to our Linux box, we still can add an extra pinch of security using an application called Firejail. It is a security utility which can sandbox any such application and let it to run in a controlled environment. To put this simply, Firejail is a SUID (Set owner User ID up on execution) program that reduces the risk of security breaches by restricting the running environment of untrusted applications.
  • “Httpd and Relayd Mastery” off to copyedit
  • Kalyna Block Cipher

Containers vs. Zones vs. Jails vs. VMs

  • Setting the Record Straight: containers vs. Zones vs. Jails vs. VMs
    I’m tired of having the same conversation over and over again with people so I figured I would put it into a blog post. Many people ask me if I have tried or what I think of Solaris Zones / BSD Jails. The answer is simply: I have tried them and I definitely like them. The conversation then heads towards them telling me how Zones and Jails are far superior to containers and that I should basically just give up with Linux containers and use VMs. Which to be honest is a bit forward to someone who has spent a large portion of her career working with containers and trying to make containers more secure. Here is what I tell them:
  • [Old] Hadoop Has Failed Us, Tech Experts Say

    The Hadoop community has so far failed to account for the poor performance and high complexity of Hadoop, Johnson says. “The Hadoop ecosystem is still basically in the hands of a small number of experts,” he says. “If you have that power and you’ve learned know how to use these tools and you’re programmer, then this thing is super powerful. But there aren’t a lot of those people. I’ve read all these things how we need another million data scientists in the world, which I think means our tools aren’t very good.”

Wine and Games

  • [Wine] Packaging changes
    Today we want to announce some important changes regarding the Wine Staging packages provided at repos.wine-staging.com and dl.winehq.org. We completely reworked our build system to make the packages available sooner after a release and also added some new features, like downloading old packages for Debian / Ubuntu. The complete list of changes can be found in the announcement email on the Wine mailing list.
  • Planescape: Torment Enhanced Edition Announced for PC, Mac, Linux, and Mobile
  • Podcast #6 with Ethan Lee, Porter on Fez, Transistor
    Have you ever played Fez on Linux ? Transistor ? Speed Runners ? Shenzen I/O ? Bastion ? or more recently, Owlboy ? Well if you have, you have benefited from the work of Flibitijibibo who is directly responsible for the port of such titles to your platform.