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Security

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (apache2 and unbound), Fedora (opendmarc, runc, and sudo), openSUSE (epiphany, GraphicsMagick, and libopenmpt), Oracle (kernel and sudo), Red Hat (java-1.8.0-openjdk, jss, kernel, kernel-rt, and kpatch-patch), SUSE (crowbar-core, crowbar-openstack, grafana, novnc, openstack-keystone, openstack-neutron, openstack-neutron-lbaas, openstack-nova, openstack-tempest, python-pysaml2, python-urllib3, rubygem-chef, rubygem-easy_diff, sleshammer, libpcap, sudo, and tcpdump), and Ubuntu (aspell and libsdl1.2).

  • Cybersecurity Awareness Month: Increasing our self-awareness so we can improve security

    October has been National Cybersecurity Awareness Month since 2004. According to staysafeonline.org, this initiative was started by the National Cybersecurity Alliance and the US Department of Homeland Security to help all Americans stay safe and secure when online. This month is usually marked with a significant uptick in cybersecurity outreach and training. It’s also the one month of the year when you can get a significant amount of cybersecurity swag such as webcam covers, mugs, and pens. This event has an outward focus to raise awareness of security globally,

    Many other events have come into existence along with this. For example, there are numerous electronics recycling events that now occur in October where people can securely dispose of their old computers. Some municipalities have extended this to include safe disposal of old prescription medications, paints, and other hazardous materials.

    Recent events in the greater technology community, specifically the resignation of Richard Stallman from both MIT and the Free Software Foundation, have become character foils that show us that while we have come a long way, we still have a long way ahead of us to improve.

  • Michael Tremer/IPFire: On quadrupling throughput of our Quality of Service

    There have been improvements to our Quality of Service (or QoS) which have made me very excited.

    Our QoS sometimes was a bottleneck. Enabling it could cut your bandwidth in half if you were unlucky. That normally was not a problem for larger users of IPFire, because if you are running a 1 Gigabit/s connection, you would not need any QoS in the first place, or your hardware was fast enough to handle the extra load.

    For the smaller users this was, however, becoming more and more of a problem. Smaller systems like the IPFire Mini Appliance are designed to be small (the clue is in the name) and to be very energy-efficient. And they are. They are popular with users with a standard DSL connection of up to 100 Megabit/s which is very common in Germany. You have nothing to worry about here. But if you are lucky to have a faster Internet connection, then this hardware and others that we have sold before might be running out of steam. There is only so much you can get out of them.

  • The City Of Baltimore Blew Off A $76,000 Ransomware Demand Only To Find Out A Bunch Of Its Data Had Never Been Backed Up [Ed: Windows]

    The City of Baltimore was hit with a ransomware attack in May of this year. Criminals using remodeled and rebranded NSA exploits (EternalBlue) knocked out a "majority" of the city's servers and crippled many of its applications. More details didn't surface until September when the city's government began reshuffling the budget to cover the expenses of recovering from the attack.

Google: Replacing Google Chrome, AMP and Titan Security Keys

Filed under
Google
Security
Web
  • The top 5 alternatives to Google Chrome

    Google Chrome is the most popular web browser on the market. It provides a user-friendly, easy-to-use interface, with a simple appearance featuring a combined address and search bar with a small space for extensions.

    Chrome also offers excellent interconnectivity on different devices and easy syncing that means that once a user installs the browser on different devices, all their settings, bookmarks and search history come along with it. Virtually all a user does on Google chrome is backed up to Google Cloud.

    Chrome also offers easy connectivity to other Google products, such as Docs, Drive, and YouTube via an “Apps” menu on the bookmarks bar, located just below the address/search bar. Google Translate, one of the best translation applications currently available on the internet, is also included.

  • Google unplugs AMP, hooks it into OpenJS Foundation after critics turn up the volume [Ed: Microsoft Tim on Google passing a bunch of EEE to a foundation headed by a Microsoft ‘mole’, 'open'JS ]

    AMP – which originally stood for Accelerated Mobile Pages though not any more – was launched in 2015, ostensibly to speed up page loading on smartphones. The technology includes AMP HTML, which is a set of performance-optimized web components, and the AMP Cache, which serves validated AMP pages. Most AMP pages are served by Google’s AMP Cache.

  • Google USB-C Titan Security Keys Begin Shipping Tomorrow

    Google announced their new USB-C Titan Security Key will begin shipping tomorrow for offering two-factor authentication support with not only Android devices but all the major operating systems as well.

    The USB-C Titan Security Key is being manufactured by well known 2FA key provider Yubico. This new security key is using the same chip and firmware currently used by Google's existing USB-A/NFC and Bluetooth/NFC/USB Titan Security Key models.

Improved Security and Privacy Indicators in Firefox 70

Filed under
Moz/FF
Security
Web

The upcoming Firefox 70 release will update the security and privacy indicators in the URL bar.

In recent years we have seen a great increase in the number of websites that are delivered securely via HTTPS. At the same time, privacy threats have become more prevalent on the web and Firefox has shipped new technologies to protect our users against tracking.

To better reflect this new environment, the updated UI takes a step towards treating secure HTTPS as the default method of transport for websites, instead of a way to identify website security. It also puts greater emphasis on user privacy.

Read more

Proprietary Software Security and FOSS Patches

Filed under
Security
  • Compromised AWS API Key Allowed Access to Imperva Customer Data

    Imperva has shared more information on how [attackers] managed to obtain information on Cloud Web Application Firewall (WAF) customers, and revealed that the incident involved a compromised administrative API key.

  • Oil Refiner Reports Major IT Incident in Finland

    It’s not yet clear whether the cause is a malfunction or a cyber attack, according to spokeswoman Susanna Sieppi. The issue is under investigation, and it’s too early to estimate when the systems will be fixed, she said by phone.

  • WordPress 5.2.4 Security Release

    WordPress 5.2.4 is now available! This security release fixes 6 security issues.

    WordPress versions 5.2.3 and earlier are affected by these bugs, which are fixed in version 5.2.4. Updated versions of WordPress 5.1 and earlier are also available for any users who have not yet updated to 5.2.

  • Ubuntu Releases Patch for Major ‘sudo’ Security Exploit

    Canonical has issued an urgent security fix to the ‘sudo’ package in the Ubuntu archives following the discovery of a major security flaw.

    A critical fix has rolled out to all users of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, 18.04 LTS, 19.04 and 19.10 (and one assumes Ubuntu 14.04 ESR too) — just run a sudo apt upgrade to install it.

    But what about the flaw inquisition? Well, if you’re yet to hear about it I appreciate meditative disconnect from social media. The oft toxic waste pools of chatter were with wet with alarm — some manufactured, the rest well weighted — over CVE-2019-14287 when it was announced yesterday, October 14.

  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (sudo and xtrlock), openSUSE (sudo), Red Hat (Single Sign-On), Slackware (sudo), SUSE (binutils, dhcp, ffmpeg, kernel, kubernetes-salt, sudo, and tcpdump), and Ubuntu (sudo).

Linux security hole: Much sudo about nothing

Filed under
Linux
Security

There's a lot of hubbub out there now about a security hole in the Unix/Linux family's sudo command. Sudo is the command, which enables normal users to run commands as if they were the root user, aka the system administrator. While this sudo security vulnerability is a real problem and needs patching, it's not nearly as bad as some people make it out to be.

At first glance the problem looks like a bad one. With it, a user who is allowed to use sudo to run commands as any other user, except root, can still use it to run root commands. For this to happen, several things must be set up just wrong.

First the sudo user group must give a user the right to use sudo but doesn't give the privilege of using it to run root commands. That can happen when you want a user to have the right to run specific commands that they wouldn't normally be able to use. Next, sudo must be configured to allow a user to run commands as an arbitrary user via the ALL keyword in a Runas specification.

Read more

Debian and Ubuntu Patch Critical Sudo Security Vulnerability, Update Now

Filed under
Security
Debian
Ubuntu

Discovered by Joe Vennix, the security vulnerability (CVE-2019-14287) could be exploited by an attacker to execute arbitrary commands as the root user (system administrator) because sudo incorrectly handled certain user IDs when it was configured to allow users to run commands as an arbitrary user through the ALL keyword in a Runas specification.

"Joe Vennix discovered that sudo, a program designed to provide limited super user privileges to specific users, when configured to allow a user to run commands as an arbitrary user via the ALL keyword in a Runas specification, allows to run commands as root by specifying the user ID- -1 or 4294967295," reads Debian's security advisory.

Read more

Security: XML External Entity (XXE) Example and the Latest Patches

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Security
  • XML External Entity (XXE) Example

    According to OWASP, an XML External Entity attack is a type of attack against an application that parses XML input. This attack occurs when XML input containing a reference to an external entity is processed by a weakly configured XML parser. This attack may lead to the disclosure of confidential data, denial of service, server side request forgery, port scanning from the perspective of the machine where the parser is located, and other system impacts.

    If a parser accepts unsanitized XML, we can take advantage of that and send our own crafted external XML payload to exploit our target. This post won’t be long so let’s get into it.

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (chromium, sdl, and unbound), Debian (clamav, libdatetime-timezone-perl, openssl, tcpdump, and tzdata), Fedora (cutter-re, jackson-annotations, jackson-bom, jackson-core, jackson-databind, jackson-parent, libapreq2, ming, opendmarc, radare2, and thunderbird), openSUSE (chromium), Oracle (kernel), and SUSE (axis, jakarta-commons-fileupload, kernel, sles12sp3-docker-image, sles12sp4-image, system-user-root, and webkit2gtk3).

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Use sshuttle to build a poor man’s VPN

    Nowadays, business networks often use a VPN (virtual private network) for secure communications with workers. However, the protocols used can sometimes make performance slow. If you can reach reach a host on the remote network with SSH, you could set up port forwarding. But this can be painful, especially if you need to work with many hosts on that network. Enter sshuttle — which lets you set up a quick and dirty VPN with just SSH access. Read on for more information on how to use it.

    The sshuttle application was designed for exactly the kind of scenario described above. The only requirement on the remote side is that the host must have Python available. This is because sshuttle constructs and runs some Python source code to help transmit data.

    [...]

    Depending on the capabilities of your system and the remote system, you can use sshuttle for an IPv6 based VPN. You can also set up configuration files and integrate it with your system startup if desired. If you want to read even more about sshuttle and how it works, check out the official documentation.

  • Hardening Firefox against Injection Attacks

    Firefox not only renders web pages on the internet but also ships with a variety of built-in pages, commonly referred to as about:pages. Such about: pages provide an interface to reveal internal state of the browser. Most prominently, about:config, which exposes an API to inspect and update preferences and settings which allows Firefox users to tailor their Firefox instance to their specific needs.

    Since such about: pages are also implemented using HTML and JavaScript they are subject to the same security model as regular web pages and therefore not immune against code injection attacks. More figuratively, if an attacker manages to inject code into such an about: page, it potentially allows an attacker to execute the injected script code in the security context of the browser itself, hence allowing the attacker to perform arbitrary actions on the behalf of the user.

    To better protect our users and to add an additional layer of security to Firefox, we rewrote all inline event handlers and moved all inline JavaScript code to packaged files for all 45 about: pages. This allowed us to apply a strong Content Security Policy (CSP) such as ‘default-src chrome:’ which ensures that injected JavaScript code does not execute. Instead JavaScript code only executes when loaded from a packaged resource using the internal chrome: protocol. Not allowing any inline script in any of the about: pages limits the attack surface of arbitrary code execution and hence provides a strong first line of defense against code injection attacks.

  • IPFire on AWS: Update to IPFire 2.23 - Core Update 136

    Today, we have updated IPFire on AWS to IPFire 2.23 - Core Update 136 - the latest official release of IPFire.

    This update includes security fixes for OpenSSL and the Linux kernel, an updated Perl, and of course many other fixes throughout the whole system.

  • Pros and cons of event-driven security

    Great news, everyone! Forrester Research says that 95% of all recorded breaches in 2016 came from only three industries: government, technology, and retail. Everyone else is safe... ish, right?

    Hold on for a moment. Tech? Retail? What kind of industry diversification is this? We are, after all, living in 2019, where every business is a tech business. And all of us are continuously selling something, whether it’s an innovative product or an amazing service.

    So what the report should have said is that 95% of all recorded breaches came from attacks on 95% of all businesses both online and offline. And some of the attackers went for the .gov.

    More on the matter, 43% of attackers target small businesses—and that’s a lot considering that, on average, a hack attempt takes place every 39 seconds.

    To top things off, the average cost of a data breach in 2020 is expected to exceed $150 million. These stats sound a bit more terrifying out of context, but the threat is still very much real. Ouch.

Security: WireGuard, SafeBreach and More

Filed under
Security
  • WireGuard Snapshot `0.0.20191012` Available
    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    Hash: SHA256
    
    Hello,
    
    A new snapshot, `0.0.20191012`, has been tagged in the git repository.
    
    Please note that this snapshot is a snapshot rather than a final
    release that is considered secure and bug-free. WireGuard is generally
    thought to be fairly stable, and most likely will not crash your
    computer (though it may).  However, as this is a snapshot, it comes
    with no guarantees; it is not applicable for CVEs.
    
    With all that said, if you'd like to test this snapshot out, there are a
    few relevant changes.
    
    == Changes ==
    
      * qemu: bump default version
      * netns: add test for failing 5.3 FIB changes
      
      Kernels 5.3.0 - 5.3.3 crash (and are probably exploitable) via this one liner:
      
      unshare -rUn sh -c 'ip link add dummy1 type dummy && ip link set dummy1 up && ip -6 route add default dev dummy1 && ip -6 rule add table main suppress_prefixlength 0 && ping -f 1234::1'
      
      We fixed this upstream here:
      
      https://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/davem/net.git/commit/?id=ca7a03c4175366a92cee0ccc4fec0038c3266e26
      
      This is relevant to WireGuard because a very similar sequence of commands is
      used by wg-quick(8).
      
      So, we've now added some tests to catch this code path in the future. While
      the bug here was a random old use-after-free, the test checks the general
      policy routing setup used by wg-quick(8), so that we make sure this continues
      to work with future kernels.
      
      * noise: recompare stamps after taking write lock
      
      We now recompare counters while holding a write lock.
      
      * netlink: allow preventing creation of new peers when updating
      
      This is a small enhancement for wg-dynamic, so that we can update peers
      without readding them if they've already been removed.
      
      * wg-quick: android: use Binder for setting DNS on Android 10
      
      wg-quick(8) for Android now supports Android 10 (Q). We'll be releasing a new
      version of the app for this later today.
    
    This snapshot contains commits from: Jason A. Donenfeld and Nicolas Douma.
    
    As always, the source is available at https://git.zx2c4.com/WireGuard/ and
    information about the project is available at https://www.wireguard.com/ .
    
    This snapshot is available in compressed tarball form here:
      https://git.zx2c4.com/WireGuard/snapshot/WireGuard-0.0.20191012.tar.xz
      SHA2-256: 93573193c9c1c22fde31eb1729ad428ca39da77a603a3d81561a9816ccecfa8e
      BLAKE2b-256: d7979c453201b9fb6b1ad12092515b27ea6899397637a34f46e74b52b36ddf56
    
    A PGP signature of that file decompressed is available here:
      https://git.zx2c4.com/WireGuard/snapshot/WireGuard-0.0.20191012.tar.asc
      Signing key: AB9942E6D4A4CFC3412620A749FC7012A5DE03AE
    
    If you're a snapshot package maintainer, please bump your package version. If
    you're a user, the WireGuard team welcomes any and all feedback on this latest
    snapshot.
    
    Finally, WireGuard development thrives on donations. By popular demand, we
    have a webpage for this: https://www.wireguard.com/donations/
    
    Thank you,
    Jason Donenfeld
    
  • WireGuard 0.0.20191012 Released With Latest Fixes

    WireGuard is still working on transitioning to the Linux kernel's existing crypto API as a faster approach to finally make it into the mainline kernel, but for those using the out-of-tree WireGuard secure VPN tunnel support, a new development release is available.

  • SafeBreach catches vulnerability in controversial HP Touchpoint Analytics software

    Now the feature is embroiled in another minor controversy after security researchers at SafeBreach said they uncovered a new vulnerability. HP Touchpoint Analytics comes preinstalled on many HP devices that run Windows. Every version below 4.1.4.2827 is affected by what SafeBreach found.

    In a blog post, SafeBreach Labs security researcher Peleg Hadar said that because the service is executed as "NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM," it is afforded extremely powerful permissions that give it wide access.

    "The CVE-2019-6333 vulnerability gives attackers the ability to load and execute malicious payloads using a signed service. This ability might be abused by an attacker for different purposes such as execution and evasion, for example: Application Whitelisting Bypass Signature Validation Bypassing," Hadar wrote.

    [...]

    The company has long had to defend HP Touchpoint Analytics against critics who say it gives HP unnecessary access to users' systems. When it first became widely noticed in 2017, dozens of users complained that they had not consented to adding the system.

  • Security Tool Sprawl Reaches Tipping Point
  • How trusted digital certificates complement open source security

    Application developers incorporating open source software into their designs may only discover later that elements of this software have left them (and their customers) exposed to cyber-attacks.

  • Securing the Container Supply Chain

Security: SecTor, WhatsApp and Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII)

Filed under
Security
  • #SecTorCa: Millions of Phones Leaking Information Via Tor

    There is a privacy threat lurking on perhaps hundreds of millions of devices, that could enable potential attackers to track and profile users, by using information leaked via the Tor network, even if the users never intentionally installed Tor in the first place.

    In a session at the SecTor security conference in Toronto, Canada on October 10, researchers Adam Podgorski and Milind Bhargava from Deloitte Canada outlined and demonstrated previously undisclosed research into how they were able to determine that personally identifiable information (PII) is being leaked by millions of mobile users every day over Tor.

    The irony of the issue is that Tor is a technology and a network that is intended to help provide and enable anonymity for users. With Tor, traffic travels through a number of different network hops to an eventual exit point in the hope of masking where the traffic originated from. Podgorski said that there are some users that choose to install a Tor browser on their mobile devices, but that’s not the problem. The problem is that Tor is being installed by mobile applications without user knowledge and potentially putting users at risk.

    The researchers explained that they set up several Tor exit nodes, just to see what they could find, and the results were surprising. The researchers found that approximately 30% of all Android devices are transmitting data over Tor.

  • Just a GIF Image Could Have Hacked Your Android Phone Using WhatsApp

    Today, the short looping clips, GIFs are everywhere—on your social media, on your message boards, on your chats, helping users perfectly express their emotions, making people laugh, and reliving a highlight.

    But what if an innocent-looking GIF greeting with Good morning, Happy Birthday, or Merry Christmas message hacks your smartphone?

  • FLOSS Weekly 550: CII Best Practices Badge Update

    The Linux Foundation (LF) Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII) Best Practices badge is a way for Free/Libre and Open Source Software (FLOSS) projects to show that they follow best practices. Projects can voluntarily self-certify, at no cost, by using this web application to explain how they follow each best practice. The CII Best Practices Badge is inspired by the many badges available to projects on GitHub. Consumers of the badge can quickly assess which FLOSS projects are following best practices and as a result are more likely to produce higher-quality secure software.

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Some nice widgets for your Plasma desktop

Plasma is an extremely extensible, flexible desktop environment, and it lets you customize and change anything and everything to the tiniest detail. You can go about mimicking other desktops and systems as you please, limited only by your imagination and patience. If you want a Mac-like look or a Unity look, you can. So I thought, I should revisit my old Plasma widgets article and explore some fresh applets out there, to see what else you can do here. Indeed, there are lots of hidden goodies lurking beneath the surface, and if you're curious, you will discover fresh tools and features that can make the Plasma desktop experience even more enjoyable. Read more

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (apache2 and unbound), Fedora (opendmarc, runc, and sudo), openSUSE (epiphany, GraphicsMagick, and libopenmpt), Oracle (kernel and sudo), Red Hat (java-1.8.0-openjdk, jss, kernel, kernel-rt, and kpatch-patch), SUSE (crowbar-core, crowbar-openstack, grafana, novnc, openstack-keystone, openstack-neutron, openstack-neutron-lbaas, openstack-nova, openstack-tempest, python-pysaml2, python-urllib3, rubygem-chef, rubygem-easy_diff, sleshammer, libpcap, sudo, and tcpdump), and Ubuntu (aspell and libsdl1.2).

  • Cybersecurity Awareness Month: Increasing our self-awareness so we can improve security

    October has been National Cybersecurity Awareness Month since 2004. According to staysafeonline.org, this initiative was started by the National Cybersecurity Alliance and the US Department of Homeland Security to help all Americans stay safe and secure when online. This month is usually marked with a significant uptick in cybersecurity outreach and training. It’s also the one month of the year when you can get a significant amount of cybersecurity swag such as webcam covers, mugs, and pens. This event has an outward focus to raise awareness of security globally, Many other events have come into existence along with this. For example, there are numerous electronics recycling events that now occur in October where people can securely dispose of their old computers. Some municipalities have extended this to include safe disposal of old prescription medications, paints, and other hazardous materials. Recent events in the greater technology community, specifically the resignation of Richard Stallman from both MIT and the Free Software Foundation, have become character foils that show us that while we have come a long way, we still have a long way ahead of us to improve.

  • Michael Tremer/IPFire: On quadrupling throughput of our Quality of Service

    There have been improvements to our Quality of Service (or QoS) which have made me very excited. Our QoS sometimes was a bottleneck. Enabling it could cut your bandwidth in half if you were unlucky. That normally was not a problem for larger users of IPFire, because if you are running a 1 Gigabit/s connection, you would not need any QoS in the first place, or your hardware was fast enough to handle the extra load. For the smaller users this was, however, becoming more and more of a problem. Smaller systems like the IPFire Mini Appliance are designed to be small (the clue is in the name) and to be very energy-efficient. And they are. They are popular with users with a standard DSL connection of up to 100 Megabit/s which is very common in Germany. You have nothing to worry about here. But if you are lucky to have a faster Internet connection, then this hardware and others that we have sold before might be running out of steam. There is only so much you can get out of them.

  • The City Of Baltimore Blew Off A $76,000 Ransomware Demand Only To Find Out A Bunch Of Its Data Had Never Been Backed Up [Ed: Windows]

    The City of Baltimore was hit with a ransomware attack in May of this year. Criminals using remodeled and rebranded NSA exploits (EternalBlue) knocked out a "majority" of the city's servers and crippled many of its applications. More details didn't surface until September when the city's government began reshuffling the budget to cover the expenses of recovering from the attack.

Games: AI War 2, Dominus Galaxia, Sipho, Lonely Mountains: Downhill and More

  • AI War 2, the massive RTS game confirmed for launch on October 22

    Arcen Games have now fully confirmed that October 22 is the final launch date for AI War 2 to leave Early Access. This is the sequel to the critically acclaimed AI War: Fleet Command released back in 2009, which eventually came to Linux too later in 2014. The release of AI War 2 is going to mark 10 years since the original! Funded on Kickstarter back in 2016 with the help of around 2,545 backers. AI War 2 is a grand strategy RTS hybrid against an overwhelming, inhuman enemy who has conquered the galaxy. The enemy has made only a single error: underestimating you. You must steal as much technology as you can, take enough territory to fortify your bases and launch your last stand.

  • Dominus Galaxia, a 4x strategy game heavily inspired by Master of Orion 1 has a Linux demo up

    Their aim with Dominus Galaxia is to be an upgraded spiritual successor to the original Master of Orion, they said to think of it like if Master of Orion 2 was a proper sequel and not a "a radical re-imagining". It's currently crowdfunding on Kickstarter which has 10 days to go with nearly 50% of the funding needed, with a bit of a stretch it may be able to make it. Just recently, they put up a full demo of the game with Linux support on itch.io.

  • Creature building action and survival game 'Sipho' adds some fun new zooids for your monstrosity

    Swim, kill, adapt and hopefully survive. That's the aim of the game in Sipho and the recent update adds in some new pieces for you to unlock to build your horrific sea creature with. It's such a strange game, blending together furious action with a creature builder where you unlock different parts and species. Based on real science, inspired by the Siphonophorae with your creature being built with zooids, an animal that forms part of a colony that all move together.

  • No Linux version of Lonely Mountains: Downhill yet due to IL2CPP in Unity

    Megagon Industries have now confirmed the status of Lonely Mountains: Downhill for Linux and currently it's not good news. This is a game that was funded on Kickstarter, that had Linux as a platform for release. If this sounds familiar, it's because we wrote about this game recently where the developer seemed a bit confused on the Linux version and they weren't clear on what they were doing.

  • Project RIP, a new FPS released recently with Linux support and it looks action-packed

    Fight off waves of demons in Project RIP from developer Storming Tech, a new Unreal Engine first-person shooter that has Linux support. This is the same developer who also made Escape Legacy: Ancient Scrolls, an escape room puzzle game which also seemed quite good.

  • The Northgard free Conquest expansion is launching October 22

    The huge free Conquest expansion for the strategy game Northgard is now confirmed to be releasing on October 22. As announced before this free update is going to include a new standalone game mode, which can be played solo or in co-op. Offering up a series of missions, offering a what they claim is "100+" hours of extra possible play time. The missions don't seem to be linked, offering up something new each time with specific victory conditions and rule sets.

  • The impressively smooth roguelike Jupiter Hell has a big AI upgrade and a first sale

    ChaosForge continue advancing their turn-based shooter roguelike shooter Jupiter Hell, with another big update now available. A big focus has been on the AI to actually make it a bit smarter. Humanoid enemies will now attempt to take cover and not always run in a straight line at you, which can make it a little more difficult for sure. Most enemies will also react to noise you and other NPCs make. The demon-like enemies will now track you by smell, so you can't hide from them. You might find the need to retreat more often, to find a better position.

Red Hat and Fedora: syslog-ng, Ansible, Libinput and Fedora Community

  • syslog-ng in two words at One Identity UNITE: reduce and simplify

    UNITE is the partner and user conference of One Identity, the company behind syslog-ng. This time the conference took place in Phoenix, Arizona where I talked to a number of American business customers and partners about syslog-ng. They were really enthusiastic about syslog-ng and emphasized two major reasons why they use syslog-ng or plan to introduce it to their infrastructure: syslog-ng allows them to reduce the log data volume and greatly simplify their infrastructure by introducing a separate log management layer. [...] When you collect log messages to a central location using syslog-ng, you can archive all of the messages there. If you add a new log analysis application to your infrastructure, you can just point syslog-ng at it and forward the necessary subset of log data there. Life at both security and operations in your environment becomes easier, as there is only a single software to check for security problems and distribute on your systems instead of many.

  • Ansible vs Terraform vs Juju: Fight or cooperation?

    Ansible vs Terraform vs Juju vs Chef vs SaltStack vs Puppet vs CloudFormation – there are so many tools available out there. What are these tools? Do I need all of them? Are they fighting with each other or cooperating? The answer is not really straightforward. It usually depends on your needs and the particular use case. While some of these tools (Ansible, Chef, StaltStack, Puppet) are pure configuration management solutions, the others (Juju, Terraform, CloudFormation) focus more on services orchestration. For the purpose of this blog, we’re going to focus on Ansible vs Terraform vs Juju comparison – the three major players which have dominated the market. [...] Contrary to both Ansible and Terraform, Juju is an application modelling tool, developed and maintained by Canonical. You can use it to model and automate deployments of even very complex environments consisting of various interconnected applications. Examples of such environments include OpenStack, Kubernetes or Ceph clusters. Apart from the initial deployment, you can also use Juju to orchestrate deployed services too. Thanks to Juju you can backup, upgrade or scale-out your applications as easily as executing a single command. Like Terraform, Juju uses a declarative approach, but it brings it beyond the providers up to the applications layer. You can not only declare a number of machines to be deployed or number of application units, but also configuration options for deployed applications, relations between them, etc. Juju takes care of the rest of the job. This allows you to focus on shaping your application instead of struggling with the exact routines and recipes for deploying them. Forget the “How?” and focus on the “What?”.

  • libinput's bus factor is 1

    Let's arbitrarily pick the 1.9.0 release (roughly 2 years ago) and look at the numbers: of the ~1200 commits since 1.9.0, just under 990 were done by me. In those 2 years we had 76 contributors in total, but only 24 of which have more than one commit and only 6 contributors have more than 5 commits. The numbers don't really change much even if we go all the way back to 1.0.0 in 2015. These numbers do not include the non-development work: release maintenance for new releases and point releases, reviewing CI failures [1], writing documentation (including the stuff on this blog), testing and bug triage. Right now, this is effectively all done by one person. This is... less than ideal. At this point libinput is more-or-less the only input stack we have [2] and all major distributions rely on it. It drives mice, touchpads, tablets, keyboards, touchscreens, trackballs, etc. so basically everything except joysticks.

  • Contribute to Fedora Magazine

    Do you love Linux and open source? Do you have ideas to share, enjoy writing, or want to help run a blog with over 60k visits every week? Then you’re at the right place! Fedora Magazine is looking for contributors. This article walks you through various options of contributing and guides you through the process of becoming a contributor.

  • Fabiano Fidêncio: Libosinfo (Part I)

    Libosinfo is the operating system information database. As a project, it consists of three different parts, with the goal to provide a single place containing all the required information about an operating system in order to provision and manage it in a virtualized environment.

  • Τι κάνεις FOSSCOMM 2019

    When the students visited our Fedora booth, they were excited to take some Fedora gifts, especially the tattoo sticker. I was asking how many of them used Fedora, and most of them were using Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Kali Linux and Elementary OS. It was an opportunity to share the Fedora 30 edition and give the beginner’s guide that the Fedora community wrote in a little book. Most of them enjoyed taking photos with the Linux frame I did in Edinburgh... [...] I was planning to teach the use of the GTK library with C, Python, and Vala. However, because of the time and the preference of the attendees, we only worked with C. The workshop was supported by Alex Angelo who also traduced some of my expressions in Greek. I was flexible in using different Operating Systems such as Linux Mint, Ubuntu, Kubuntu among other distros. There were only two users that used Fedora. Almost half of the audience did not bring a laptop, and then I grouped in groups to work together. I enjoyed to see young students eager to learn, they took their own notes, and asked questions. You might see the video of the workshop that was recorded by the organizers.

  • Extending the Minimization objective

    Earlier this summer, the Fedora Council approved the first phase of the Minimization objective. Minimization looks at package dependencies and tries to minimize the footprint for a variety of use cases. The first phase resulted in the development of a feedback pipeline, a better understanding of the problem space, and some initial ideas for policy improvements.