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Acer Chromebook 15 for Linux and Wimbledon

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Earlier this month my husband and I needed a replacement for the Chromebook that I had installed Linux on after Christmas because the keyboard developed a fault. This was a good opportunity to get an upgrade and to connect the 28-inch monitor to it, allowing us to watch Wimbledon over the Internet (we don't watch TV).

Unboxing photos:

Setting up the machine:

It comes with Chrome OS, but I don't want that:

Switch to developer mode:

Setting it up to not be so locked down:

With Roy's help, installing Ubuntu LTS:

Nearly done:

Running KDE/Plasma (my favourite):

Running XFCE:

Running Unity (which I still try to use on a daily basis after using KDE for years):

We have since then bought a cabinet for the external screen and Roy finished building it 2 days ago, so now we can watch shows while we work (4 screen combined using Synergy).

5 Best Data Recovery Tools For Linux To Recover Data Or Deleted Partitions

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5 best data recovery tools for linux

Atleast once in life, most of us do wrong with the important data on our computer and then we think we must not have deleted this, whether some important documents or lectures' videos or bunch of important projects. Instead of cursing yourselves for such a foolish mistake, let's do some work. Let's try to recover that deleted data out from our HD. Here I am reviewing 5 of the best Data recover tools that can help recovering deleted data on Linux.

Read At LinuxAndUbuntu

Airdroid - Transfer Files Between Android Phones/Tablets And Linux (Any Distribution)

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airdroid transfer file between android phone/tablet and linux mint ubuntu

We often need to transfer large amount data in the form of mp3 Songs, Video Songs, Movies and most importantly, large Games between android phones/tablets and Linux machine. Transferring via USB cable takes time, so let's do it with 'Airdroid' easily and quickly.
 
 
 
 

Read at LinuxAndUbuntu

PostInstallerF Prepares Post Install In Ubuntu And Fedora

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PostInstallerF prepares post install in Ubuntu and Fedora

It takes too much time to prepare a newly installed Operating System. First find the repositories, then add them to install the desired softwares. But PostInstallerFmakes that big task a lot easier. 
  
 
 
 

Read at LinuxAndUbuntu

My Chromebook with KDE

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I got my new Chromebook... Smile Yes, you've heard me right, but wait before you raise your eyebrows...

HP Chromebook 14

HP Chromebook 14

HP Chromebook 14

HP Chromebook 14

HP Chromebook 14

HP Chromebook 14

I installed Ubuntu on it as my default OS, though I can go back to Chrome OS any time I want. I don't see any point in doing it.

HP Chromebook 14

Roy helped me do the partitioning, configuration and tweaking. We configure it in a way so that I can use it in my work, not just for Facebooking, tweeting and chatting's sake.

HP Chromebook 14

HP Chromebook 14

I am still exploring the machine, basically familiarising with the keyboard and all the function settings on it. The Kubuntu environment which I chose will need some adjustments; also the applications which I downloaded are a bit different from the other laptop's (which I used to work on).

HP Chromebook 14

Change is good, but it requires a lot of patience and adaptation to the new environment.

HP Chromebook 14

I like my Chromebook very much. It is one of the best gifts I have received from my husband. It is more practical, it gives me more confidence to learn and to develop more of my computer skills. Innovation is fast-moving and technology is progressing, so you definitely need to catch up with it. Unless you want to be left behind by choice...

Is Nokia Really Dying?

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Telephone

It was almost two months ago that I wrote about Nokia's most-awaited comeback, for the new designs and innovation of their mobile phones, but it did not happen. In fact, Nokia's ordeal became worse because Nokia is dying. Yes! Nokia is dying as Microsoft once again used their power 'trick' to get a stranglehold on the most influential and trusted company when it comes to innovation and technology. No matter what changes and what Microsoft is doing, there will be no difference. Chances are, only the features and profiles have changed, but the personal interest and infrastructure most likely are the same or even worse than that. Now Nokia has become the new platform of surveillance, it will never be the same again. The trust has been tarnished, the public has become more aware of Microsoft's anomalies and all sorts of devil's advocate games. Doing business with Microsoft is a big mistake. Take Nokia's example. I hope Android and Tizen will not consider deals or any tie-ups with Microsoft, and to all the rest who support and advocate open source, rest assured that FOSS will prevail.

OpenSUSE from an Ubuntu users point of view..

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I'm not a huge fan of VS posts, you know, Linux Mint VS Fedora.. I'm a Linux user, and i've recently migrated from Ubuntu to OpenSuse to see what the other side of the fence is likem what's done different, what is good, what is not so good. I've put together a few observations

Please, have a read

Pandora FMS 4.0.2 released!

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A new version of Pandora FMS http://pandorafms.com is ready! Artica ST http://artica.es has released Pandora FMS 4.0.2 with the aim to improve the tool, keep reliability and improve the performance. In this new version of the IT monitoring several new features were added but the big effort was to fix bugs and improve existing features.

Ulteo 3.0 on Ubuntu 10.04.x

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Thin Client computing is the current system of choice in so many enterprise systems today with the big players being VMware and Citrix and even Windows 2008 trying to nudge its way into the act with its Seamless Remote Desktop Applications. All of these systems provide clients which will access the applicaitons which are run from a central server and all of them are well tested and run on thousands of systems.

Not to be left out Opensource is now getting its act together and the rudimentry underpinnings of a thin client infrastructure with the recent release of Ulteo 3.0 and its Open Source Virtual Desktop and Application Delivery solutions

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XBMCbuntu Eden on the ASRock 330

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The latest release of XBMC my preferred application for viewing my Movie collection on the TV and there has been an updated release just recently. I was urged to give this a whirl as it has an Apple Airplay server built in for streaming video on the TV from the iPad.

I have been running XBMC 10.0 on a Sabayon system for the past few months and it's beeen running well, however always one for the new and change I wanted to give XBMC 11 a bit of a go. The first stage was to see if the Sabayon repositories had an update, they did however it wasn't to the release version it was to the release candidate 2. This doesn't include the airplay functionality so an alternative was needed.

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Mozilla: ASan Nightly Project, National Science Foundation (NSF), “Arch” at JSConf EU in Berlin

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    Every day, countless Mozillians spend numerous hours testing Firefox to ensure that Firefox users get a stable and secure product. However, no product is bug free and, despite all of our testing efforts, browsers still crash sometimes. When we investigate our crash reports, some of them even look like lingering security issues (e.g. use-after-free or other memory corruptions) but the data we have in these reports is often not sufficient for them to be actionable on their own (i.e. they do not provide enough information for a developer to be able to find and fix the problem). This is particularly true for use-after-free problems and some other types of memory corruptions where the actual crash happens a lot later than the memory violation itself. In our automated integration and fuzz testing, we have been using AddressSanitizer (ASan), a compile-time instrumentation, very successfully for over 5 years. The information it provides about use-after-free is much more actionable than a simple crash stack: It not only tells you immediately when the violation happens, but also includes the location where the memory was free’d previously.
  • A Science Fair with $1.6 Million in Prizes
    Across the U.S., community technologists are using creative ideas — like solar-powered Wi-Fi and mesh networks — to connect the unconnected. This August, Mozilla is gathering those projects under one roof for a science fair — and awarding $1.6 million in prizes to the most promising ideas. The event is the final leg of the Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society (WINS) Challenges, a $2 million competition run by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and Mozilla. Launched in 2017, the initiative awards prizes to the people and projects who are connecting unconnected Americans with scalable, secure, and resilient solutions.
  • The Arch: Using Rust & WebAssembly to animate 30k colored LED lights
    In June, Mozilla collaborated with an artist named Ian Brill to create an installation called the “Arch” at JSConf EU in Berlin. This interactive environment allowed people to experience the intersection of art and technology in a physical, pulsating, immersive way. Visitors could view the larger-than-life Arch and experience an ever-changing light show of 30,000 colored LEDs. To support the exhibit, Mozilla engineers built a platform that enabled anyone to use web technologies (with underlying implementation in Rust & WebAssembly) to control the Arch animations and makes the light display interactive. The result was fun and colorful — and it gave developers a chance to interact with unfamiliar new technologies.

Security: Updates, First PGPainless Release, and 'The Cloud'

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • First PGPainless Release!
    PGPainless 0.0.1-alpha1 is the first non-snapshot release and is available from maven central. It was an interesting experience to go through the process of creating a release and I’m looking forward to have many more releases in the future :) The current release contains a workaround for the bug I described in an earlier blog post. The issue was, that bouncycastle wouldn’t mark the public sub keys of a secret key ring as sub keys, which results in loss of keys if the user tries to create a public key ring from the exported public keys. My workaround fixes the issue by iterating through all sub keys of an existing key ring and converting the key packages of subkeys to subkey packages. The code is also available as a gist.
  • Thousands of US voters' data exposed by robocall firm
    A Virginia-based political campaign and robocalling company, which claims it can "reach thousands of voters instantly," left a huge batch of files containing hundreds of thousands of voter records on a public and exposed Amazon S3 bucket that anyone could access without a password.  The bucket contained close to 2,600 files, including spreadsheets and audio recordings, for several US political campaigns. Kromtech Security's Bob Diachenko, who discovered the exposed data and blogged his findings, shared prior to publication several screenshots of data, packed with voters' full names, home addresses, and political affiliations.
  • Another Day, Another Pile Of Voter Data Left Laying Around On A Public Server
    Leaving private voter or customer data easily accessible on a public-facing server is the hot new fashion trend. You'll recall that it's a problem that has plagued the Defense Department, GOP data firm Deep Root Analytics (198 million voter records exposed), Verizon's marketing partners (6 million users impacted), Time Warner Cable (4 million users impacted), and countless other companies or partners that failed to implement even basic security practices. And it's a trend that shows no sign of slowing down despite repeated, similar stories (much of it thanks to analysis by security researcher Chris Vickery). This week yet another pile of private voter data was left publicly accessible for anybody to peruse. According to analysis by Kromtech Security’s Bob Dianchenko, a Virginia-based political consulting and robocalling company by the name of Robocent publicly exposed 2,600 files, including voter file spreadsheets (including voter phone numbers, names, addresses, political affiliations, gender, voting districts and more) and audio recordings for a number of political campaigns.

Canonical/Ubuntu: End of Ubuntu 17.10, Ubuntu Podcast, Snaps Add Flexibility with Tracks and Canonical Needs Help

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    Ubuntu 17.10 reaches end of life on July 19, 2018 — which if you haven’t checked your calendar recently, is today. If you have thus far managed to resist the temptation to upgrade to a newer release then alas: today is the day when you need to start thinking about it.
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  • Snaps Add Flexibility with Tracks
    Snap packages have a rich set of features beyond getting the latest shiny on your Linux distribution. Tracks enable developers to publish multiple supported releases of their application under the same name. With this enabled, a user can switch tracks at any time to install and use an alternate supported relase of software. Within each track are four standard channels named edge, beta, candidate and stable. The channels represent the risk-level users should expect from the snaps within. Edge snaps (typically built from the latest code committed) would be riskier to use than beta releases, which are more risky than stable releases. By default every application has one ‘latest’ track and the four named channels. Developers can optionally choose whether to supplement that with additional tracks. Further the developer can choose which channels to use within those tracks.
  • Canonical Needs Your Help to Test the Improved Ubuntu 18.04.1 Server Installer
    Canonical's Dimitri John Ledkov put out a call for testing for the Ubuntu community to help them test drive the improved Ubuntu Server installer in the upcoming Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS point release. Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS, the first of a total of five scheduled point releases of the long-term supported Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system series is about to be released in approximately one week from the moment of writing, on July 26, 2018, with improved and up-to-date core components and apps.
  • Help Test the New Ubuntu Server Installer
    I only ask because Canonical’s server bods are currently looking for wily folks to help them test an improved version of the new Ubuntu Server installer.

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