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Reviews

Linux Mint "Bianca" KDE Edition Beta 020: A Small Review

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Linux Mint is an Ubuntu-based distro whose goal in life, per its website, "is to produce an elegant, up to date and comfortable GNU/Linux desktop distribution." The developers have released both GNOME-based and KDE-based versions in the past, and their latest version, v2.2 "Bianca," is already final in its GNOME incarnation.

Short & Sweet on SimplyMepis 6.5rc3 (updated)

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I didn't spot too much really new with yesterday's (or the day before's) release of SimplyMepis 6.5.rc3, but there were two noteworthy improvements. ..or rather one noteworthy improvement and one feature addition.

Hacao linux ! Hot news from Vietnamese ECHIP

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Hacao linux, Hot news from Vietnamese ECHIP

Installing openSUSE 10.2 on a Compaq laptop (Part 2)

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In part 1, openSUSE got installed and configured on a Compaq Presario V2000 with an ATI Radeon Xpress 200M PCIE graphics chipset and a 32-bit CPU. Now it's time to go for the bling.

Installing openSUSE 10.2 on a Compaq laptop (Part 1)

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My favorite distro faces an uncertain future, so I decided to install openSUSE 10.2 over it on my Compac Presario V2000. Also because... OK, I'll come clean: the real reason was for the eye candy. I wanted Beryl, with the cube, the wobbly windows, the "magic lantern" window minimizing effects, rain, snow -- you know, Eye Candy.

Hacao linux 2.01 Professional Top News on Vietnamese ECHIP

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Hacao linux 2.01 Professional Top News on Vietnamese ECHIP again.

Coke Blak

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This morning in Grand Central, Coca-Cola salespeople were handing out free bottles of Coca-Cola Blak, their new coffee-Coke-combo "energy" drink intended to compete with Red Bull. Ed Levine, food writer and blogger, states, "It's odd... I don't want any more of it."

SLED 10 rocks!

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And just to get that out of the way; SLED 10 is an amazing OS. I can't remeber ever having had so many «how can this be free software ?!?»-experiences. Everything is easy, everything is beautiful.

Cpanel Wins for Security, A Short Review

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This is a short review I wanted to write about cpanel. I never have been the greatest fan of it since it is only compatible with apache1 and all but after using other control panels I realized how secure and practical cpanel is for a multiple user server and hosting enviorment.
Read it here http://www.evolution-security.com/modules.php?name=News&file=article&sid=291

CentOS and Redhat, Best for the Server

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Short review of CentOS and Red Hat and how Ubuntu is not gonna push anyone out of the server and enterprise market especially these two.

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Linux firewalls: What you need to know about iptables and firewalld

A firewall is a set of rules. When a data packet moves into or out of a protected network space, its contents (in particular, information about its origin, target, and the protocol it plans to use) are tested against the firewall rules to see if it should be allowed through. Here’s a simple example... Read more

Mozilla: Firefox GCC/LLVM Clang Dilemma, September 2018 CA Communication and CfP

  • Fedora Firefox – GCC/CLANG dilemma
    After reading Mike’s blog post about official Mozilla Firefox switch to LLVM Clang, I was wondering if we should also use that setup for official Fedora Firefox binaries. The numbers look strong but as Honza Hubicka mentioned, Mozilla uses pretty ancient GCC6 to create binaries and it’s not very fair to compare it with up-to date LLVM Clang 6. Also if I’m reading the mozilla bug correctly the PGO/LTO is not yet enabled for Linux, only plain optimized builds are used for now…which means the transition at Mozilla is not so far than I expected.
  • September 2018 CA Communication
    Mozilla has sent a CA Communication to inform Certification Authorities (CAs) who have root certificates included in Mozilla’s program about current events relevant to their membership in our program and to remind them of upcoming deadlines. This CA Communication has been emailed to the Primary Point of Contact (POC) and an email alias for each CA in Mozilla’s program, and they have been asked to respond to the following 7 action items:
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    Some strategies I’ve recommended in the past for dealing with this include looking at the conference’s marketing materials to imagine who they would interest, and examining the abstracts of past years’ talks.

today's howtos

Security: Quantum Computing and Cryptography, Time to Rebuild Alpine Linux Docker Container

  • Quantum Computing and Cryptography
    Quantum computing is a new way of computing -- one that could allow humankind to perform computations that are simply impossible using today's computing technologies. It allows for very fast searching, something that would break some of the encryption algorithms we use today. And it allows us to easily factor large numbers, something that would break the RSA cryptosystem for any key length. This is why cryptographers are hard at work designing and analyzing "quantum-resistant" public-key algorithms. Currently, quantum computing is too nascent for cryptographers to be sure of what is secure and what isn't. But even assuming aliens have developed the technology to its full potential, quantum computing doesn't spell the end of the world for cryptography. Symmetric cryptography is easy to make quantum-resistant, and we're working on quantum-resistant public-key algorithms. If public-key cryptography ends up being a temporary anomaly based on our mathematical knowledge and computational ability, we'll still survive. And if some inconceivable alien technology can break all of cryptography, we still can have secrecy based on information theory -- albeit with significant loss of capability. At its core, cryptography relies on the mathematical quirk that some things are easier to do than to undo. Just as it's easier to smash a plate than to glue all the pieces back together, it's much easier to multiply two prime numbers together to obtain one large number than it is to factor that large number back into two prime numbers. Asymmetries of this kind -- one-way functions and trap-door one-way functions -- underlie all of cryptography.
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