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Reviews

Kdenlive: Video Editing Breakthrough

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In my view, it has for a number of years now been the greatest failing of Linux: video editors have been a joke. No one who is serious about video editing could really be happy in the least with the sorry state of non-linear video editing apps.

Review - OpenSUSE 11.1

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I decided to install OpenSUSE this weekend onto my new Maxtor 4 USB hard drive. I've used the live CD before with KDE 4.1, but didn't like not having the option to have different backgrounds on the multiple desktops. Supposedly, this option and others will be available in KDE 4.2. So, instead of waiting, I decided to install KDE 3.5.10. Here's how it went.....

Ubuntu Getting Unprecedented Raves at PC Mag

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A major Windows mag features two major glowing reviews for the Linux distro

XBMC

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Streaming media around the home, is something which is becoming a more commercial viability, if you look at the amount of hardware available for the Task, the Big Boys, Buffalo, Dlink, LinkSys, Freecom and NetGear all have Network Media extenders which attach to your network, and TV, and allow you to stream music and video off a NAS Server or computer to your TV.

Foresight Linux is good

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Foresight is awesome, finally gave it a shot and it is now my main distro. I am running it on my desktop pc, which is an Intel E8500 with a Nvidia 7600gt graphics card. It runs fast and seems way faster than Ubuntu 8.10 did. The only extra I installed was the extra codecs for MP3 playback. Flash works great and doesnt have any flicker to it.

Run Ubuntu inside Windows without VMware!

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Harry informed me yesterday that he found this super cool "Portable Ubuntu". And what is this thing you'll ask? Yet Another Live-cd???
The answer is NO. Portable Ubuntu can be run INSIDE WINDOWS WITHOUT VMWARE or any other virtualization program!! And it is easy to use as any windows program.

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On OpenSuse 11

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Overall, it's a good looking desktop ( it's green, but that changes easily enough) they have included some documentation for folks to get an idea how to get started using it. The only thing that stands out cosmetically to me is the slab menu.

WordPress 2.5 Review

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Yesterday the long awaited and somewhat delayed WordPress 2.5 was released. Today, I updated my installation today and though I had a few problems the upgrade to the new version was definitely worth it.

Open Source Deki Wiki by Mindtouch

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About three months ago I was looking for a wiki for a private project and used WikiMatrix to figure out what wiki software best met my needs. My main requirements were that the software was open source, easy-to-use, and there was a free hosted version to play around with.

Kubuntu 7.10 Review.

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I have been a fan of (K)Ubuntu since ages. It goes back to the 5.x days. I have been using the 6.06 LTS till now. I like the LTS concept and would definitely try to stick with that.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Firefox Nightly, JS, Security and Rust

  • Firefox Nightly: These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 75
  • Additional JavaScript syntax support in add-on developer tools

    When an add-on is submitted to Firefox for validation, the add-ons linter checks its code and displays relevant errors, warnings, or friendly messages for the developer to review. JavaScript is constantly evolving, and when the linter lags behind the language, developers may see syntax errors for code that is generally considered acceptable. These errors block developers from getting their add-on signed or listed on addons.mozilla.org.

  • A look at password security, Part I: history and background

    Today I’d like to talk about passwords. Yes, I know, passwords are the worst, but why? This is the first of a series of posts about passwords, with this one focusing on the origins of our current password systems starting with log in for multi-user systems. The conventional story for what’s wrong with passwords goes something like this: Passwords are simultaneously too long for users to memorize and too short to be secure. It’s easy to see how to get to this conclusion. If we restrict ourselves to just letters and numbers, then there are about 26 one character passwords, 212 two character passwords, etc. The fastest password cracking systems can check about 236 passwords/second, so if you want a password which takes a year to crack, you need a password of 10 characters long or longer. The situation is actually far worse than this; most people don’t use randomly generated passwords because they are hard to generate and hard to remember. Instead they tend to use words, sometimes adding a number, punctuation, or capitalization here and there. The result is passwords that are easy to crack, hence the need for password managers and the like. This analysis isn’t wrong, precisely; but if you’ve ever watched a movie where someone tries to break into a computer by typing passwords over and over, you’re probably thinking “nobody is a fast enough typist to try billions of passwords a second”. This is obviously true, so where does password cracking come into it? [...] This design is a huge improvement over just having a file with cleartext passwords and it might seem at this point like you didn’t need to stop people from reading the password file at all. In fact, on the original UNIX systems where this design was used, the /etc/passwd file was publicly readable. However, upon further reflection, it has the drawback that it’s cheap to verify a guess for a given password: just compute H(guess) and compare it to what’s been stored. This wouldn’t be much of an issue if people used strong passwords, but because people generally choose bad passwords, it is possible to write password cracking programs which would try out candidate passwords (typically starting with a list of common passwords and then trying variants) to see if any of these matched. Programs to do this task quickly emerged. The key thing to realize is that the computation of H(guess) can be done offline. Once you have a copy of the password file, you can compare your pre-computed hashes of candidate passwords against the password file without interacting with the system at all. By contrast, in an online attack you have to interact with the system for each guess, which gives it an opportunity to rate limit you in various ways (for instance by taking a long time to return an answer or by locking out the account after some number of failures). In an offline attack, this kind of countermeasure is ineffective.

  • Announcing Rustup 1.22.1

    The rustup working group is happy to announce the release of rustup version 1.22.1. Rustup is the recommended tool to install Rust, a programming language that is empowering everyone to build reliable and efficient software.

  • This Week in Rust 346

4 Useful Extensions to Make GNOME Desktop Easier to Use

If you’ve ever used the GNOME Shell on your Linux system, you’ve probably noticed that there are some ways it works that don’t make sense right away. The workspaces are arranged vertically, and there’s no dock, panel, or desktop icons to get to your applications easily. That’s where GNOME Shell Extensions come into play. Let’s check out some Gnome extensions that make the desktop easier to use. [...] This, along with the default four-finger gesture in Wayland, makes me feel like I’m using a system that is designed for the modern user on a laptop or a user with a trackpad attached to their desktop. It would be a great way to make use of an Apple Magic Trackpad on Linux, as it would allow you to work with one of the best trackpads in the world and use it for more than just clicking and scrolling. Now that you’ve taken your Linux laptop to the next level with GNOME Shell Extensions, make sure you learn how to get notified of updates for your extensions, check out some of the best laptops for Linux, and fix your touchpad that is not working in Linux. Read more

today's howtos

Open Usage Commons

  • Introducing the Open Usage Commons

    Open source maintainers don’t often spend time thinking about their project’s trademarks, and with good reason: between code contribution, documentation, crafting the technical direction, and creating a healthy contributor community, there’s plenty to do without spending time considering how your project’s name or logo will be used. But trademarks – whether a name, logo, or badge – are an extension of a project’s decision to be open source. Just as your project’s open source license demonstrates that your codebase is for free and fair use, an open source project trademark policy in keeping with the Open Source Definition gives everyone – upstream contributors and downstream consumers – comfort that they are using your project’s marks in a fair and accurate way.

  • Open Usage Commons Is Google-Backed Organization For Helping With Open-Source Project Trademarks

    Open Usage Commons is a new organization announced today that is backed by Google for helping open-source projects in managing their trademarks. Open Usage Commons was started by Google in conjunction with academia, independent contributors, and others for helping to assert and manage project identities through trademark management and conformance testing.

  • The "Open Usage Commons" launches

    Google has announced the creation of the Open Usage Commons, which is intended to help open-source projects manage their trademarks.

  • Announcing a new kind of open source organization

    Google has deep roots in open source. We're proud of our 20 years of contributions and community collaboration. The scale and tenure of Google’s open source participation has taught us what works well, what doesn’t, and where the corner cases are that challenge projects.