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Acer Chromebook 15 for Linux and Wimbledon

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Earlier this month my husband and I needed a replacement for the Chromebook that I had installed Linux on after Christmas because the keyboard developed a fault. This was a good opportunity to get an upgrade and to connect the 28-inch monitor to it, allowing us to watch Wimbledon over the Internet (we don't watch TV).

Unboxing photos:

Setting up the machine:

It comes with Chrome OS, but I don't want that:

Switch to developer mode:

Setting it up to not be so locked down:

With Roy's help, installing Ubuntu LTS:

Nearly done:

Running KDE/Plasma (my favourite):

Running XFCE:

Running Unity (which I still try to use on a daily basis after using KDE for years):

We have since then bought a cabinet for the external screen and Roy finished building it 2 days ago, so now we can watch shows while we work (4 screen combined using Synergy).

5 Best Data Recovery Tools For Linux To Recover Data Or Deleted Partitions

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5 best data recovery tools for linux

Atleast once in life, most of us do wrong with the important data on our computer and then we think we must not have deleted this, whether some important documents or lectures' videos or bunch of important projects. Instead of cursing yourselves for such a foolish mistake, let's do some work. Let's try to recover that deleted data out from our HD. Here I am reviewing 5 of the best Data recover tools that can help recovering deleted data on Linux.

Read At LinuxAndUbuntu

Airdroid - Transfer Files Between Android Phones/Tablets And Linux (Any Distribution)

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airdroid transfer file between android phone/tablet and linux mint ubuntu

We often need to transfer large amount data in the form of mp3 Songs, Video Songs, Movies and most importantly, large Games between android phones/tablets and Linux machine. Transferring via USB cable takes time, so let's do it with 'Airdroid' easily and quickly.
 
 
 
 

Read at LinuxAndUbuntu

PostInstallerF Prepares Post Install In Ubuntu And Fedora

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PostInstallerF prepares post install in Ubuntu and Fedora

It takes too much time to prepare a newly installed Operating System. First find the repositories, then add them to install the desired softwares. But PostInstallerFmakes that big task a lot easier. 
  
 
 
 

Read at LinuxAndUbuntu

My Chromebook with KDE

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I got my new Chromebook... Smile Yes, you've heard me right, but wait before you raise your eyebrows...

HP Chromebook 14

HP Chromebook 14

HP Chromebook 14

HP Chromebook 14

HP Chromebook 14

HP Chromebook 14

I installed Ubuntu on it as my default OS, though I can go back to Chrome OS any time I want. I don't see any point in doing it.

HP Chromebook 14

Roy helped me do the partitioning, configuration and tweaking. We configure it in a way so that I can use it in my work, not just for Facebooking, tweeting and chatting's sake.

HP Chromebook 14

HP Chromebook 14

I am still exploring the machine, basically familiarising with the keyboard and all the function settings on it. The Kubuntu environment which I chose will need some adjustments; also the applications which I downloaded are a bit different from the other laptop's (which I used to work on).

HP Chromebook 14

Change is good, but it requires a lot of patience and adaptation to the new environment.

HP Chromebook 14

I like my Chromebook very much. It is one of the best gifts I have received from my husband. It is more practical, it gives me more confidence to learn and to develop more of my computer skills. Innovation is fast-moving and technology is progressing, so you definitely need to catch up with it. Unless you want to be left behind by choice...

Is Nokia Really Dying?

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Telephone

It was almost two months ago that I wrote about Nokia's most-awaited comeback, for the new designs and innovation of their mobile phones, but it did not happen. In fact, Nokia's ordeal became worse because Nokia is dying. Yes! Nokia is dying as Microsoft once again used their power 'trick' to get a stranglehold on the most influential and trusted company when it comes to innovation and technology. No matter what changes and what Microsoft is doing, there will be no difference. Chances are, only the features and profiles have changed, but the personal interest and infrastructure most likely are the same or even worse than that. Now Nokia has become the new platform of surveillance, it will never be the same again. The trust has been tarnished, the public has become more aware of Microsoft's anomalies and all sorts of devil's advocate games. Doing business with Microsoft is a big mistake. Take Nokia's example. I hope Android and Tizen will not consider deals or any tie-ups with Microsoft, and to all the rest who support and advocate open source, rest assured that FOSS will prevail.

OpenSUSE from an Ubuntu users point of view..

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I'm not a huge fan of VS posts, you know, Linux Mint VS Fedora.. I'm a Linux user, and i've recently migrated from Ubuntu to OpenSuse to see what the other side of the fence is likem what's done different, what is good, what is not so good. I've put together a few observations

Please, have a read

Pandora FMS 4.0.2 released!

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A new version of Pandora FMS http://pandorafms.com is ready! Artica ST http://artica.es has released Pandora FMS 4.0.2 with the aim to improve the tool, keep reliability and improve the performance. In this new version of the IT monitoring several new features were added but the big effort was to fix bugs and improve existing features.

Ulteo 3.0 on Ubuntu 10.04.x

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Thin Client computing is the current system of choice in so many enterprise systems today with the big players being VMware and Citrix and even Windows 2008 trying to nudge its way into the act with its Seamless Remote Desktop Applications. All of these systems provide clients which will access the applicaitons which are run from a central server and all of them are well tested and run on thousands of systems.

Not to be left out Opensource is now getting its act together and the rudimentry underpinnings of a thin client infrastructure with the recent release of Ulteo 3.0 and its Open Source Virtual Desktop and Application Delivery solutions

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XBMCbuntu Eden on the ASRock 330

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The latest release of XBMC my preferred application for viewing my Movie collection on the TV and there has been an updated release just recently. I was urged to give this a whirl as it has an Apple Airplay server built in for streaming video on the TV from the iPad.

I have been running XBMC 10.0 on a Sabayon system for the past few months and it's beeen running well, however always one for the new and change I wanted to give XBMC 11 a bit of a go. The first stage was to see if the Sabayon repositories had an update, they did however it wasn't to the release version it was to the release candidate 2. This doesn't include the airplay functionality so an alternative was needed.

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  • Working open source | daniel.haxx.se

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Programming: Buzzwords, Meson, Tracealyzer, LLVM, Python and Rust

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  • Nibble Stew: The Meson Manual: Good News, Bad News and Good News

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  • Percepio Releases Tracealyzer Visual Trace Diagnostics Solution Version 4.4 with Support for Embedded Linux

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  • LLVM Adds A SPIR-V CPU Runner For Handling GPU Kernels On The CPU - Phoronix

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  • Librsvg's test suite is now in Rust

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ARM32 in Linux and Open Source Hardware Certification

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    As I continue to describe in different postings how the ARM32 start-up sequence works, it becomes necessary to explain in-depth the basic kernel concepts around page tables and how it is implemented on ARM32 platforms. To understand the paging setup, we need to repeat and extend some Linux paging lingo. Some good background is to read Mel Gormans description of the Linux page tables from his book “Understanding the Linux Virtual Memory Manager”. This book was published in 2007 and is based on Mel’s PhD thesis from 2003. Some stuff has happened in the 13 years since then, but the basics still hold. It is necessary to also understand the new layers in the page tables such as the five layers of page tables currently used in the Linux kernel. First a primer: the ARM32 architecture with a classic MMU has 2 levels of page tables and the more recent LPAE (Large Physical Address Extension) MMU has 3 levels of page tables. Only some of the ARMv7 architectures have LPAE, and it is only conditionally enabled, i.e. the machines can also use the classic MMU if they want, they have both. It is not enabled by default on the multi_v7 configuration: your machine has to explicitly turn it on during compilation. The layout is so different that the same binary image can never support both classic and LPAE MMU in the same kernel image.

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LibreOffice: Presentation Size Decreasing and New Presentations About LibreOffice