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Variscite Launches New Variants for the DART-6UL SoM with Improved Certified Wi-Fi/BT Module with 802.11 ac/a/b/g/n Support

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In a matter of only two months, Variscite has announced the launch of an additional enhancement for the DART-6UL System on Module (SoM) product line based on the NXP Cortex-A7 i.MX6 UltraLite family.

Opera 27 Stable Web Browser Released With Tab Preview Back, Install In Ubuntu, Linux Mint And Others ubuntu Derivatives

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opera 27 stable web browser released for install Linux mint/Ubuntu

Today Opera team released Opera 27 version with couple of major changes and with lots of fixes. This is the first stable release of 2015. Opera keeps on coming with beta releases that have several fixes. Although the beta versions were also good and can be used without any problems. This one is the stable release of Opera Web Browser containing two major changes and lots of fixes. Lets see at the changes in this release.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

MakuluLinux 6 Codename "Imperium" MATE 1.8 Edition Released Tomorrow

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MakuluLinux

LAST night I received a timely recommendation of the Debian-based MakuluLinux. For more details and background see the main page of MakuluLinux, this recent video review, and a very brief announcement of an upcoming release with MATE, which is described in this old post.

There is a lot more information out there about MakuluLinux Mate Edition, whose 1.8 version is being planned/finalised/slated for release this Monday. There isn't yet an official site announcement, but the links to the Preview Edition will hopefully help those who want to try out the distro. It is a "true" community distro of GNU/Linux.

Statistics Not Compatible With Varnish

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Statistics

VARNISH is valuable for a number of reasons, including security, privacy, and performance. I first used it around 2009 when another site of mine had repeatedly come under DDOS attacks. Using Varnish means that requests for pages usually come from the same IP address (the cache proxy), if at all. Much of the time visitors get served static (cached) pages transparently and quickly. The downside is, this interferes with statistics (the Apache server does not even see all requests) and it is not compatible with modules like polls, where each IP addressed is allowed just one vote.

During the server/site migration we tried to preserve as many of the features as we could. There was a transition from old Debian to new CentOS and the new architecture is quite different (still 2 CPU cores but with more RAM, a virtual container, and resilience owing to proxies/redundancy). Thanks to those who suggested workarounds. We have looked at some of them, but without losing on performance there is no way to keep meaningful statistics. These statistics have been disabled. Not even we, with direct access to the server and the CMS, have access to meaningful statistics.

We are going to try to focus on high quality selection of news, not on numbers.

Slight Site Changes

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Yesterday, following a mostly successful migration (there are still some impending fixes to .htaccess), slight changes were applied. For regular readers of the site, here they are summarised:

Piwik 1.8 released

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It is an alternative to Google Analytics and from my experience, better in many respects. The latest version, released just today June 1 2012, is Piwik 1.8, and it comes with its share of new and improved features and bugfixes.

This release is rated critical, so if you are running Piwik 1.7.1, the previous stable version, immediate upgrade is highly recommended.

He can steal your smart phone’s and tablet’s encryption keys

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If you think that the encryption keys that your smart phone or tablet computer uses to protect data you want to keep others from accessing is secure, well … think again.

Crypto researchers have demonstrated that those encryption keys can be stolen using techniques that are not that difficult to assemble.

What happened to Boxee?

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Boxee was an early full screen playback system which suited Ubuntu well, and the community in the most part followed it creating their own set top boxes and starting the cut the cord revolution.

Well Boxee knows how to say thank you for that early desktop commitment...

Read more...

The Internet will find a way, and the consumer will always win..

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In the US, for the first time in a very long time the government are going to be in situ this wednesday to vote, do what ever it is they are doing to try and get the Stop Online Piracy Act passed or at least to the next stage.

Realistically does it matter if the pass, fail, whatever, long term the future of copyright and censorship has nothing to do with this act, its' down to the consumer and the internet.. It's you and I not the US Government who hold the future..

Read more...

Put a little something in tuxmachines stocking

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With Christmas just 10 days away how about putting a little extra something in tuxmachines stocking this year? I know times are tough but if you have an extra 5 or 10 or even 20 bucks it would be a really nice way to say thanks to Susan for bringing us our daily fix of news and information.

http://www.tuxmachines.org/node/15555

Merry Christmas to all!

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Pseudo-Open Source (Openwashing)

OSS Leftovers

  • The Serverless Show: The Importance of Open Source & Community Involvement
    “I’m also involved with some open source projects. I started with Node community and helping out with some node libraries a long time ago. Now I’m mostly doing serverless-related things. I joined the Claudia.js team a long time ago, almost at the beginning, and helped Gojko Adzic and Alexander Simovich to build Claudia.js. Claudia was and still is a deployment library for AWS Lambda and API gateway. At the beginning, it was really hard to deploy serverless applications. If you tried to do that manually, you need to zip everything, to set the permissions, and things like that. The idea of Claudia was to extend AWS CLI tools and to help users deploy serverless applications easier. We continued doing Claudia and a few other things. We contributed a bit to AWS SAM and we built some other applications that are open source. We’re trying to build tools that we need and that the serverless community needs.”
  • Expect to Hear More About Open Source’s Role in Security [Ed: Security implemented with proprietary software is almost always fake. The Australian back doors ("encryption") bill is a reminder of it. If something is proprietary, one must assume back doors (even mandated from above, hidden in binaries)]
    Will 2019 be the year there is a big push for consolidation between open source and cybersecurity? Yes, said Sanjay Beri, CEO of Netskope, in an email comment. IBM’s acquisition of Red Hat could prove to be the game changer in how organizations approach security.
  • Want to Save Some Money? Check out These Free Software Alternatives
    The list covers drawing and design, animation and film, website building, and others. For example, Ghost Malone presents several free alternatives to drawing, design and post-processing, such as GIMP, Krita, Fire Alpaca, Autodesk Sketchbook, MediBang Paint, and Paint.NET. Another example, for editing vector graphics, is Inkscape, which is free and open source. The list goes on with several choices depending on what you're looking for.
  • A free and open source Bitcoin trading tool has been developed by two students
    University students Jonathan Shobrook and Aaron Lichtman have created a free and open source automated trading bot to use on the Bitstamp exchange.
  • Thank Stanford researchers for Puffer, a free and open source live TV streaming service that uses AI to improve video-streaming algorithms
  • Open Source To Open Newer Avenues For CIOs In 2019
    Open source plays a crucial role in all the top strategic technology trends that are reshaping the IT world. Rajarshi Bhattacharyya, Country Head, SUSE, looks at the key trends for 2019 that organizations need to explore and in explains how open source technologies and practices open up a window of opportunities for the CIOs in the coming days.
  • The High Profile Team of Handshake Looks to Truly Open the Internet with a New Domain Name System
    Unlike other major blockchain based companies like Ethereum, they chose to avoid ICO funding altogether and went straight for private investors. They were able to obtain major private investment funding from companies such as Polychain Capital, A16Z Crypto, and Founders Fund (purchasing 7.5% coin supply of HNS between them at $10.2M) with the idea that they could be responsible for replacing entire layers of Domain Name System (DNS) layering. This removes the need for those who safeguard these layers, saving future companies large amounts of cash up front.
  • Handshake is attempting to make the Internet more open
    Handshake came out of stealth mode last August. The project, which intends to replace various levels of the Domain Name System (DNS) hierarchy, was founded by Joseph Poon (co-creator of the Lightning Network & Plasma), Andrew Lee (co-founder & CEO of Purse), Andrew Lee (co-founder & CEO of Private Internet Access), Boyma Fahnbulleh (Bcoin developer), and Christopher Jeffery (Creator of Bcoin & CTO of Purse). Sidestepping the ICO route popularized by Ethereum, Handshake raised private funding from a slew of investors including A16Z Crypto, Polychain Capital, and Founders Fund. These investors purchased 7.5% of the initial coin supply of HNS, Handshake’s native token, for $10.2M, valuing the protocol at $136M.
  • Google remains the top open-source contributor to CNCF projects
    According to the latest data from Stackalytics, a project founded by Mirantis and hosted by the OpenStack Foundation that visualizes a company’s contribution to open-source projects, Google remains the dominant force in the CNCF open-source ecosystem. Indeed, according to this data, Google is responsible for almost 53 percent of all code commits to CNCF projects. Red Hat, the second biggest contributor, is far behind, with 7.4 percent. The CNCF is the home of Kubernetes, the extremely popular container orchestration service that Google open sourced, so the fact that Google is the top contributor may not seem like a major surprise. But according to this data, Google would still be the top code contributor to all CNCF projects without even taking Kubernetes into account. In part, that’s due to the fact that Google is also the major contributor to GRPC, a queuing project the company donated to the CNCF, and Vitess, the database clustering system it developed for YouTube.
  • Google Remains Top Open-Source Contributor
    According to a scan of code contributions to projects sponsored by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), Google (NASDAQ: GOOGL) remains by far the largest contributor of code across all projects. Using a tool called Stackalytics, the survey conducted by open-source infrastructure vendor Mirantis found that Google accounted for 52.9 percent of code commits to CNCF projects.
  • Johnson Controls to Introduce Open-Source Software for Targeting Retrofits

Server Side Public License (SSPL), Red Hat and Fedora

  • Red Hat/Fedora decide MongoDB’s SSLP doesn’t fit
    MongoDB’s January blues deepened this week as the team behind the Red Hat-backed Fedora Linux distribution confirmed it had added the open source database’s Server Side Public License to its “bad”list. The move came as it emerged Red Hat – Fedora’s sponsor – had nixed MongoDB support in RHEL 8.0.
  • AWS Raised Its Hand Lest Of Open Source Platform
    Even though AWS stands by MongoDB as the best the customers find it difficult to build and vastly accessible applications on the open-source platform can range from multiple terabytes to hundreds of thousands of reads and writes per second. Thus, the company built its own document database with an Apache 2.0 open source MongoDB 3.6 API compatibility. The open-sources politics are quite difficult to grasp. AWS has been blamed for taking the top open-source projects and re-branding plus re-using it without providing the communities. The catch here is that MongoDB was the company behind putting a halt to the re-licensing of the open-source tools under a novel license that clearly stated the companies willing to do this will have to purchase a commercial license.
  • Red Hat gets heebie-jeebies over MongoDB's T&Cs squeeze: NoSQL database dropped from RHEL 8B over license
    MongoDB justified its decision last October to shift the free version of its NoSQL database software, MongoDB Community Server, from the open-source GNU Affero General Public License to the not-quite-so-open Server Side Public License (SSPL) by arguing that cloud providers sell open-source software as a service without giving back. The following month, and not widely noticed until this week, Red Hat said it would no longer include MongoDB in version 8 of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The removal notice came in the release notes for Red Hat Enterprise Linux Beta 8.0. Under section 4.7, the release notes say, "Note that the NoSQL MongoDB database server is not included in RHEL 8.0 Beta because it uses the Server Side Public License (SSPL)."
  • Server Side Public License struggles to gain open-source support
    MongoDB first announced the release of the new software license in October as a way to protect itself and other open-source projects like it from being taken advantage of by larger companies for monetary gain. At the time, MongoDB co-founder and CTO Eliot Horowitz explained: “This should be a time of incredible opportunity for open source. The revenue generated by a service can be a great source of funding for open-source projects, far greater than what has historically been available. The reality, however, is that once an open-source project becomes interesting, it is too easy for large cloud vendors to capture most of the value while contributing little or nothing back to the community.” Other open-source businesses have developed their own licenses or adopted others in recent months, citing the same issues. However, the problem with these new licenses is that if they are not approved by the Open Source Initiative (OSI), an organization created to promote and protect the open-source ecosystem, the software behind the license is technically not considered open source, and it will have a hard time getting acceptance from members in the community.
  • Open source has a problem with monetization, not AWS
  • Why you should take notice of the open source in enterprise suckers conundrum
    In the MongoDB case, AWS is widely regarded as responding to a licensing change MongoDB made in October 2018 that has caused something of a stir among the open source cognoscenti.
  • Fedora Community Blog: FPgM report: 2019-03
    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week. I’ve set up weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

How to Integrate Dropbox in Ubuntu Using Nautilus File Manager

This beginners guide will help you to install and integrate Dropbox in Ubuntu’s Nautilus file manager. Dropbox is a popular file hosting service provides users cloud storage and access to your files from any device. Dropbox provides free account upto a certain storage limit and also provides subscription based accounts. Dropbox provides native desktop apps for Linux systems. Read more