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VLC 3.0 Vetinari

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Movies
  • VLC 3.0 Vetinari

    VLC 3.0.0 is the first version of "Vetinari" branch of our popular media player.

  • VLC 3.0 Released

    As expected, the VLC 3.0 media player is now available!

  • The 5 Coolest Things About VLC 3.0

    VLC Chromecast support arrives in VLC 3.0, as do many other features! In this post we take a look at 5 changes that make this VLC release worth downloading.

  • VLC 3.0, PostgreSQL 10.2, Sylabs, Zerodium Bounty and More

    PostgreSQL 10.2 was released yesterday, which includes numerous bug and security fixes: "This release fixes two security issues" as well as "issues found with VACUUM, GIN and hash indexes, parallel query, logical replication, and other bugs reported over the past three months. All users using the affected versions of PostgreSQL should update as soon as possible."

MythTV 29.1 Released

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Movies
OSS
  • MythTV 29.1 Released

    Last July marked the release of MythTV 29 as the latest release of this once super popular Linux DVR/PVR software. Today marks the availability of MythTV 29.1.

  • Happy Release Day!

    The MythTV Team is pleased to announce the release of MythTV version v29.1

Video Acceleration in Fedora 28 and the Rotting of MPEG Due to Software Patents

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Red Hat
Movies
  • Fedora 28 Planning For VA-API 1.0 Support

    The latest work by Fedora developers on feature work for Fedora 28 is shipping with VA-API 1.0 support for updated capabilities around the Video Acceleration API.

    The VA-API 1.0.0 API/ABI is provided by the libva 2.0 video acceleration library. Libva 2.0 was released last October with H.264 FEI support in its API, deprecating older parts of the API, fixing a race condition with the Wayland support, renaming some parts of the API, improving the logging capabilities, and various other changes. Libva 2.0 broke API/ABI compatibility with older versions of this Intel-developed Video Acceleration API.

  • A crisis, the causes and a solution [Ed: LWN says "this blog posting from Leonardo Chiariglione, the founder and chair of MPEG, on how (in his view) the group is being destroyed by free codecs and patent trolls."]

    Because there are rumours spreading about a presumed “MPEG-Video collapse” and Brownian motion-like initiatives trying to remedy – in some cases by the very people who have contributed to creating the “crisis”.

    [...]

    In its 30 years of operation MPEG has created digital media standards that have enabled the birth and continue promoting the growth of digital media products, services and applications. Here are a few, out of close to 180 standards: MP3 for digital music (1992), MPEG-2 for digital television (1994), MPEG-4 Visual for video on internet (1998), MP4 file format for mobile handsets (2001), AVC for reduced bitrate video (2003), DASH for internet streaming (2013), MMT for IP broadcasting (2013) and more. In other words, MPEG standards have had and keep on having an impact on the lives of billions of people.

    [...]

    In 2013 MPEG approved the HEVC standard which provides the same quality as AVC at half the bitrate. The licensing situation is depicted by the picture below (courtesy of Jonathan Samuelsson of Divideon): there are 3 patent pools, one of which has not published their licence and a significant number of patent holders that have not joined any pool (and not published their licences either).

     I saw the threat coming and one year ago I tried to bring the matter to the attention of the higher layers in ISO. My attempts were thwarted by a handful of NPEs.

    Alliance for Open Media (AOM) has occupied the void created by MPEG’s outdated video compression standard (AVC), absence of competitive Options 1 standards (IVC) and unusable modern standard (HEVC). AOM’s AV1 codec, due to be released soon, is claimed to perform better than HEVC and will be offered royalty free.

    [...]

    The work of patent pools would be greatly simplified because they could define profiles with technologies that are “available” because they would know who owns which tools. Users could switch on tools once they become usable, e.g. because the relevant owner has joined a patent pool.

    These are just examples of how the MPEG standard development process can be adapted to better match the needs of entities developing licences and without becoming part – God forbid – of a licence definition process.

    [...]

    Companies will slash their video compression technology investments, thousands of jobs will go and millions of USD of funding to universities will be cut. A successful “access technology at no cost” model will spread to other fields.

    So don’t expect that in the future you will see the progress in video compression technology that we have seen in the past 30 years.

LibreELEC (Krypton) 8.2.3 MR

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Movies

LibreELEC 8.2.3 is released to change our embedded pastebin provider from sprunge.us (RIP) to ix.io (working) so users can continue to submit logs to the forums through a URL without copy/pasting text or direct uploading log files. This is our preferred way to receive and read your log files so if you are not familiar with using the paste function please read this wiki article to find out how. The 8.2.3 release also solves an issue with continuity errors on USB DVB adaptors that has been troubling some 8.2 users for some time; kudos to user @jahutchi for tracking down the problem kernel commit. We also address a long-running crashing issue with Intel BayTrail hardware that needed some users to force max_cstate in kernel boot parameters, and for bonus credit users with an Intel NUC equipped with an LED can fiddle with the colours, as we backported the LED driver from our master branch.

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OpenShot's 2018 Plans

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Software
Movies
  • Happy New Year 2018!

    Happy New Year! Last year was an amazing year for OpenShot, with huge stability and performance improvements, a new interactive transform tool, improvements to animation & key-frames, a new website (translated in 10 languages), a new cloud API (for video automation), improved playback speed, and more than 1 million installs of OpenShot 2.x. Now that 2018 has arrived, I thought it would be fun to discuss the future of OpenShot, and where it's heading for the next year.

  • OpenShot Wants to Crash Less in 2018

    Open source video editor OpenShot has shared a list of 'favourite ideas for 2018' that include improving stability, improving the UI and adding more effects.

  • OpenShot Video Editor Planning For Many Improvements In 2018

    The OpenShot open-source non-linear video editor is planning for many improvements this year.

FFmpeg 3.4 "Cantor" Open-Source Multimedia Framework Gets First Point Release

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Movies
OSS

FFmpeg 3.4.1 is the first maintenance update to the major FFMpeg 3.4 "Cantor" series of one of the most used open-source multimedia backend, and it is currently making its way into the stable software repositories of various popular GNU/Linux distributions.

As expected, this point release includes updated library versions. These are libavutil 55. 78.100, libavcodec 57.107.100, libavformat 57. 83.100, libavdevice 57. 10.100, libavfilter 6.107.100, libavresample 3.7.0, libswscale 4.8.100, libswresample 2.9.100, and libpostproc 54.7.100.

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LibreELEC 8.2.2

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GNU
Linux
Movies
  • LibreELEC (Krypton) 8.2.2 MR

    LibreELEC 8.2.2 is a minor maintenance release to resolve an ffmpeg issue that allows the legions of 3D movie fans (both of you) to watch them again. It also fixes an issue with the WeTek Core after recent WeOS updates have been installed, adds support for the 2nd generation of RF remote from OSMC, and disables the flashing blue ‘activity’ LED on the Odroid C2 that most users find annoying. That’s all it contains. No package bumps or driver or kernel changes are included, because at this late stage of the release cycle we have no desire to go fix things that might add new bugs.

  • Embedded Linux OS LibreELEC 8.2.2 "Krypton" Released with Fix for 3D Movies

    LibreELEC (Libre Embedded Linux Entertainment Center) team released today a new maintenance update to their LibreELEC 8.2 "Krypton" operating system series to fix a critical bug.

    LibreELEC 8.2.2 is the second maintenance release for the LibreELEC 8.2 "Krypton" series, which is based on the Kodi 17 "Krypton" open-source media center, and it's here one month after version 8.2.1 to fix a critical bug in the FFMpeg multimedia backend that prevented users from enjoying 3D movies.

    Users who want to watch 3D movies are recommended to manually update to LibreELEC 8.2.2 using the manual update function in the LibreELEC settings add-on, as there won't be any automatic updates available until after the Christmas holidays. If you don't want to update manually, you'll have to wait until December 27 or 28.

Lakka 2.1 Stable release

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GNU
Linux
Movies

After 6 month of intense development and bugfixes, the team is proud to announce the stable release of Lakka 2.1!

This release is a huge step forward in many aspects: UI, emulator cores, and supported hardware.

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LibreELEC (Krypton) v8.2.1 MR

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GNU
Linux
Movies

LibreELEC 8.2.1 is a maintenance release that includes Kodi 17.6. It also resolves a minor time-zone issue after recent daylight saving changes, a resume from suspend issue with the Apple IR driver, and it provides two new SMB client configuration options in Kodi settings. You can now set a minimum SMB protocol version to prevent prevent SMB1 from ever being used, and a ‘legacy security’ option forces weak authentication to resolve issues seen with the USB sharing functions on some older router/NAS devices. If updating to LibreELEC 8.2 for the first time PLEASE READ THE RELEASE NOTES below here before posting issues in the forums as there are disruptive changes to Lirc, Samba, and Tvheadend.

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Kodi 17 "Krypton" Media Center Gets Its Last Update, Kodi 18 "Leia" Coming Next

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Movies

Kodi 17.6 has been released today as the last minor bugfix update to the Krypton series, bringing a fix for a crash that could occur in the Controller dialog, updates the standard scrapers to their lastest versions available at the moment of writing, as well as a fix for some connection issues that could occur with the internal web server.

It also fixes a crash when the peripheral joystick add-on is disabled, and probably other minor issues that haven't been added to today's release notes, which mention the fact that from now on the upcoming Kodi 18 "Leia" series will be put in the spotlight and will receive more honorable mentions during its development cycle.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • CRI: The Second Boom of Container Runtimes
    Harry (Lei) Zhang, together with the CTO of HyperHQ, Xu Wang, will present “CRI: The Second Boom of Container Runtimes” at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon EU 2018, May 2-4 in Copenhagen, Denmark. The presentation will clarify about more about CRI, container runtimes, KataContainers and where they are going. Please join them if you are interested in learning more.
  • Meet Gloo, the ‘Function Gateway’ That Unifies Legacy APIs, Microservices, and Serverless
    Gloo, a single binary file written in Go, can be deployed as a Kubernetes pod, in a Docker container, and now also on Cloud Foundry. The setup also requires a copy of Envoy, though the installation process can be greatly simplified through additional software developed by the company, TheTool. The user then writes configuration objects to capture the workflow logic.
  • Why is the kernel community replacing iptables with BPF?

    The Linux kernel community recently announced bpfilter, which will replace the long-standing in-kernel implementation of iptables with high-performance network filtering powered by Linux BPF, all while guaranteeing a non-disruptive transition for Linux users.

  • The developer of Helium Rain gave an update on their sales, low overall sales but a high Linux percentage
    Helium Rain [Steam, Official Site], the gorgeous space sim from Deimos Games is really quite good so it's a shame they've seen such low overall sales. In total, they've had around 14,000€ (~$17,000) in sales which is not a lot for a game at all. The good news, is that out of the two thousand copies they say they've sold, a huge 14% of them have come from Linux. It's worth noting, that number has actually gone up since we last spoke to them, where they gave us a figure of 11% sales on Linux.
  • Want to try Wild Terra Online? We have another load of keys to give away (update: all gone)
    Wild Terra Online [Steam], the MMO from Juvty Worlds has a small but dedicated following, now is your chance to see if it's for you.
  • Arch Linux Finally Rolling Out Glibc 2.27
    Arch Linux is finally transitioning to glibc 2.27, which may make for a faster system. Glibc 2.27 was released at the start of February. This updated GNU C Library shipped with many performance optimizations particularly for Intel/x86_64 but also some ARM tuning and more. Glibc 2.27 also has memory protection keys support and other feature additions, but the performance potential has been most interesting to us.
  • Installed nvidia driver
  • Stephen Smoogen: Fedora Infrastructure Hackathon (day 1-5)
  • Design and Web team summary – 20 April 2018
    The team manages all web projects across Canonical. From www.ubuntu.com to the Juju GUI we help to bring beauty and consistency to all the web projects.
  • Costales: UbuCon Europe 2018 | 1 Week to go!!
    We'll have an awesome weekend of conferences (with 4 parallel talks), podcasts, stands, social events... Most of them are in English, but there will be in Spanish & Asturian too.
  • Tough, modular embedded PCs start at $875
    Advantech has launched two rugged, Linux-ready embedded DIN-rail computers with Intel Bay Trail SoCs and iDoor expansion: an “UNO-1372G-E” with 3x GbE ports and a smaller UNO-1372G-J with only 2x GbE, but with more serial and USB ports.

OSS Leftovers

  • IRS Website Crash Reminder of HealthCare.gov Debacle as OMB Pushes Open Source
    OMB is increasingly pushing agencies to adopt open source solutions, and in 2016 launched a pilot project requiring at least 20 percent of custom developed code to be released as open source – partly to strengthen and help maintain it by tapping a community of developers. OMB memo M-16-21 further asks agencies to make any code they develop available throughout the federal government in order to encourage its reuse. “Open source solutions give agencies access to a broad community of developers and the latest advancements in technology, which can help alleviate the issues of stagnated or out-dated systems while increasing flexibility as agency missions evolve over time,” says Henry Sowell, chief information security officer at Hortonworks Federal. “Enterprise open source also allows government agencies to reduce the risk of vendor lock-in and the vulnerabilities of un-supported software,” he adds.
  • Migrations: the sole scalable fix to tech debt.

    Migrations are both essential and frustratingly frequent as your codebase ages and your business grows: most tools and processes only support about one order of magnitude of growth before becoming ineffective, so rapid growth makes them a way of life. This isn't because they're bad processes or poor tools, quite the opposite: the fact that something stops working at significantly increased scale is a sign that it was designed appropriately to the previous constraints rather than being over designed.

  • Gui development is broken

    Why is this so hard? I just want low-level access to write a simple graphical interface in a somewhat obscure language.

OpenBSD and NetBSD

Security: Twitter and Facebook

  • Twitter banned Kaspersky Lab from advertising in Jan
     

    Twitter has banned advertising from Russian security vendor Kaspersky Lab since January, the head of the firm, Eugene Kaspersky, has disclosed.  

  • When you go to a security conference, and its mobile app leaks your data
     

    A mobile application built by a third party for the RSA security conference in San Francisco this week was found to have a few security issues of its own—including hard-coded security keys and passwords that allowed a researcher to extract the conference's attendee list. The conference organizers acknowledged the vulnerability on Twitter, but they say that only the first and last names of 114 attendees were exposed.

  • The Security Risks of Logging in With Facebook
     

    In a yet-to-be peer-reviewed study published on Freedom To Tinker, a site hosted by Princeton's Center for Information Technology Policy, three researchers document how third-party tracking scripts have the capability to scoop up information from Facebook's login API without users knowing. The tracking scripts documented by Steven Englehardt, Gunes Acar, and Arvind Narayanan represent a small slice of the invisible tracking ecosystem that follows users around the web largely without their knowledge.

  • Facebook Login data hijacked by hidden JavaScript trackers
     

    If you login to websites through Facebook, we've got some bad news: hidden trackers can suck up more of your data than you'd intended to give away, potentially opening it up to abuse.