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Kdenlive Video Editor 19.04 Arrives with Major Changes in Tow

Filed under
KDE
Software
Movies

A major update to the Kdenlive video editor is now available for download.

Kdenlive 19.04 ships as part of KDE Applications 19.04, released on April 19.

This is the vaunted “refactoring” release we’ve written lots about, as the release announcement explains further:

“Kdenlive has gone through an extensive re-write of its core code as more than 60% of its internals has changed, improving its overall architecture.”

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The Rapid Progress Of The AV1 Video Format Over The Past Year

Filed under
Movies
Moz/FF
Web

Mozilla presented at the NAB Streaming Summit last week over the state of the royalty-free AV1 video format aiming to compete with H.265/HEVC and succeeding VP9 for open-source use-cases.

In particular, a lot of AV1 progress was made over the past year compared to when the bitstream wasn't finalized, poor encoder performance, lack of AV1 support, and slow adoption. 2018 also brought the introduction of the Dav1d AV1 video decoder, more members joining the AOMedia Foundation, and other advancements.

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QMPlay2 – Qt based video and audio player

Filed under
Software
Movies

I’ve been devoting the last year writing about a wide range of open source music players. Most of them I’ve been able to recommend, although I’ve encountered a few turkeys along the way. There’s a few readers who’ve suggested I branch out and review open source software that offers both video and audio playing capabilities.

QMPlay2 is one such player. It can play most video formats and audio formats. It plays all codecs supported by FFmpeg, and supports YouTube videos too. With internet radio, Audio CD, and a lot more besides, there’s lots of functionality on offer.

The software is written in the C++ programming language with the Qt 5 framework and uses FFmpeg.

Here’s my take on QMPlay2. I’ll look at the software’s widgets in some detail, and compare its memory usage with other video players. Your feedback is very important, so feel free to add your comments below.

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Collaboration Modality and Open Access

Filed under
Movies
OSS

15 Useful And Best Media Server Software For Linux

Filed under
Software
Movies

There is no doubt that Linux is multi-purpose operating systems. It has gone far from being the operating systems for system administrators or for the programmers. You can use it for many purpose.

In this post, We will talk about some of the best Media server software for Linux so that you can turn your Linux to media server instantly.

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Video/Audio: Manjaro 18.0.4 KDE, Linux Action News, Linux Gaming News Punch and GNU World Order

Filed under
Movies
  • Manjaro 18.0.4 KDE Through

    In this video, we look at Manjaro 18.0.4. Enjoy!

  • Linux Action News 98

    Is Linux gaming really being saved by Google's Stadia platform? We discuss the details and possibilities.

    Plus good news for KDE Connect users, Intel begins work on next-generation open source video drivers, and much more.

  • Linux Gaming News Punch - Episode 5

    The Linux Gaming News Punch - Episode 5 is here once again! Another week, another ton of news and so here's your bite-sized take at a few interesting topics for those struggling to keep up.

    As usual, it has a video to give your eyes as well as your ears a feast or just the plain audio to listen to on the go.

  • gnuWorldOrder_13x13

Lakka 2.2.2 with RetroArch 1.7.6

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

Lakka 2.2.2 is now available.

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Top 8 Video Players for Your Linux Desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

Gone are the days when Linux systems are mainly used for Server-side functionalities as the latest distributions released are well-advanced and are specially designed to capture the attention of home computer users. With a much-improved GUI and various other applications, Linux Desktop has emerged far better than a Windows PC in many ways. And a video player is one such application that has gone a long way in Linux Desktop as the video players available in Linux Desktops can easily rival its Windows counterparts. In this article, we’ll take a look at the top 8 video players for Linux Desktop.

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LibreELEC (Leia) 9.0.1 MR

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

LibreELEC 9.0.1 (Leia) has arrived based upon Kodi v18.1, the 9.0.1 release contains many changes and refinements to user experience and a complete overhaul of the underlying OS core to improve stability and extend hardware support. Kodi v18 also brings new features like Kodi Retroplayer and DRM support that (equipped with an appropriate add-on) allows Kodi to unofficially stream content from services like Netflix and Amazon.

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Streama – Create Your Own Personal “Netflix” in Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

Streama is a free self hosted media streaming server running on Java, that you can install on your Linux distribution. Its features are similar to those of Kodi and Plex and it is simply a matter of personal choice which one you would like to use.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming: imapautofiler, Red Hat Decision Manager, AiC, Python-moa, WebAssembly/Python

  • imapautofiler 1.8.0
    imapautofiler applies user-defined rules to automatically organize messages on an IMAP server.
  • Modern business logic tooling workshop, lab 3: Create a domain model
    Since starting to update my free online rules and process automation workshops that showcase how to get started using modern business logic tooling, we’ve come a long way with process automation. The updates started with moving from JBoss BPM to Red Hat Decision Manager and from JBoss BPM Suite to Red Hat Process Automation Manager. The first lab update showed how to install Red Hat Decision Manager on your laptop, and the second lab showed how to create a new project. This article highlights the newest lab update for Red Hat Process Automation Manager, where you’ll learn how to create a domain model.
  • AiC: Adventures in consensus
    In the talk I gave at Rust LATAM, I said that the Rust project has always emphasized finding the best solution, rather than winning the argument. I think this is one of our deepest values. It’s also one of the hardest for us to uphold. Let’s face it – when you’re having a conversation, it’s easy to get attached to specific proposals. It’s easy to have those proposals change from “Option A” vs “Option B” to “my option” and “their option”. Once this happens, it can be very hard to let them “win” – even if you know that both options are quite reasonable. This is a problem I’ve been thinking a lot about lately. So I wanted to start an irregular series of blog posts entitled “Adventures in consensus”, or AiC for short. These posts are my way of exploring the topic, and hopefully getting some feedback from all of you while I’m at it. This first post dives into what a phrase like “finding the best solution” even means (is there a best?) as well as the mechanics of how one might go about deciding if you really have the “best” solution. Along the way, we’ll see a few places where I think our current process could do better.
  • Quansight Labs Blog: MOA: a theory for composable and verifiable tensor computations
    Python-moa (mathematics of arrays) is an approach to a high level tensor compiler that is based on the work of Lenore Mullins and her dissertation. A high level compiler is necessary because there are many optimizations that a low level compiler such as gcc will miss. It is trying to solve many of the same problems as other technologies such as the taco compiler and the xla compiler. However, it takes a much different approach than others guided by the following principles.
  • The Human in Devops
    This week a mild epiphany came to me right after a somewhat heated and tense meeting with a team of developers plus project owner of a web project. They were angry and they were not afraid to show it. They were somewhat miffed about the fact that the head wrote them an email pretty much forcing them to participate to make our DevOps initiative a success. All kinds of expletive words were running through my head in relation to describing this team of flabby, tired looking individuals in front of me, which belied the cool demeanour and composure that I was trying so hard to maintain. It happened. In the spur of the moment I too got engulfed in a sea of negativity and for a few minutes lost site of what is the most important component or pillar in a successful DevOps initiative. The people. "What a bunch of mule heads !" I thought. It's as plain as day, once this initiative is a success everybody can go home earlier and everything will be more predictable and we can do much much more than we could before. "Why are you fighting this ?!" I was ready to throw my hands up in defeat when it finally dawned on me.
  • Python Bytes: #126 WebAssembly comes to Python

Graphics: AMDGPU and X.Org Elections

  • amdgpu drm-next-5.2
  • AMDGPU Has Another Round Of Updates Ahead Of Linux 5.2
    Feature work on DRM-Next for the Linux 5.2 kernel cycle is winding down while today AMD has sent in what could be their last round of AMDGPU feature updates for this next kernel release. Building off their earlier Linux 5.2 feature work are more updates. That earlier round brought new SMU11 enablement code for Vega 20, various other Vega 20 features, HMM preparations, and other code changes.
  • 2019 Election Round 2 voting OPEN
    To all X.Org Foundation Members: The round 2 of X.Org Foundation's annual election is now open and will remain open until 23:59 UTC on 2 May 2019. Four of the eight director seats are open during this election, with the four nominees receiving the highest vote totals serving as directors for two year terms. There were six candidates nominated. For a complete list of the candidates and their personal statements, please visit the 2019 X.Org Elections page at https://www.x.org/wiki/BoardOfDirectors/Elections/2019/ The new bylaw changes were approved in the first round of voting. Here are some instructions on how to cast your vote: Login to the membership system at: https://members.x.org/ If you do not remember your password, you can click on the "lost password" button and enter your user name. An e-mail will be sent to you with your password. If you have problems with the membership system, please e-mail membership at x.org. When you login you will see an "Active Ballots" section with the "X.Org 2019 Elections Round 2" ballot. When you click on that you will be presented with a page describing the ballot. At the bottom you will find a number of dropdowns that let you rank your candidates by order of preference. For the election: There is a pull-down selection box for 1st choice, 2nd, choice, and so on. Pick your candidates top to bottom in order of preference, avoiding duplicates. After you have completed your ballot, click the "Cast vote" button. Note that once you click this button, your votes will be cast and you will not be able to make further changes, so please make sure you are satisfied with your votes before clicking the "Cast vote" button. After you click the "Vote" button, the system will verify that you have completed a valid ballot. If your ballot is invalid (e.g., you duplicated a selection or did not answer the By-laws approval question), it will return you to the previous voting page. If your ballot is valid, your votes will be recorded and the system will show you a notice that your votes were cast. Note that the election will close at 23:59 UTC on 2 May 2019. At that time, the election committee will count the votes and present the results to the current board for validation. After the current board validates the results, the election committee will present the results to the Members. Harry, on behalf of the X.Org elections committee
  • It's Time To Re-Vote Following The Botched 2019 X.Org Elections
    While there were the recent X.Org Foundation board elections, a do-over was needed as their new custom-written voting software wasn't properly recording votes... So here's now your reminder to re-vote in these X.Org elections. At least with the initial round of voting they reached a super majority and the ballot question of whether the X.Org Foundation should formally fold FreeDesktop.org into its umbrella worked and that X.Org + FreeDesktop.org hook-up passed so all is well on that front. But for the Board of Directors elections, that's where re-voting is needed with the voting software that now correctly records the votes.

today's howtos

Games: Lutris and More

  • Epic Games Store Now On Linux Thanks To Lutris
    While the Epic Games Store itself is not officially supported by the open source Linux operating system, a third-party gaming client has now made sure that you can access the store and launcher on your own distro. The Epic Games Store is now accessible on Linux via the Lutris Gaming client. The client is available to all Linux users, who in the past has provided the same users a way to play PC games without the need to have Windows installed in their machines. Although Linux is not necessarily the go-to platform when it comes to PC gaming, there is a very niche audience dedicated to making the platform work in favor of open-source and to counteract what could be perceived as a heavily Windows-biased PC gaming community. Linux gaming is somewhat tedious to the relatively casual or normal user, although there are some within the Linux community that advertise and try to foster its growth in terms of gaming, as there are some games that can run better on the operating system. That is to say, if you have a lot of patience to try and make it work.
  • You Died but a Necromancer revived you is good fun in a small package
    Sometimes, simplicity is what makes a game and in the case of You Died BaNRY that's very true. The game has little depth to it but makes up for that in just how frantic and fun it can be. The entire gameplay is just you (or you and friends) attempting to cross a small level filled with platforms, spikes and all sorts of crazy traps. It's ridiculously easy to get into as well, since the controls are so basic all you need to worry about is your movement.
  • Forager is a weirdly addictive casual grinding game that has mined into my heart
    I'm not usually one for games that have you endlessly wander around, collect resources, build a little and repeat but Forager is so ridiculously charming it's lovely.
  • DragonRuby Game Toolkit, a cross-platform way to make games with Ruby
    Now for something a little different! Ryan "Icculus" Gordon, a name known for many Linux ports and SDL2 teamed up with indie developer Amir Rajan to create a new cross-platform toolkit. Why was it created? Well, in a nutshell they both "hate the complexity of today's engines" and this toolkit was actually made to help ship A Dark Room for the Nintendo Switch, which shows how versatile it is.