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Hardware

Linux in La Frite and Airtame

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Linux
Hardware
  • La Frite mini PC by Libre Computer Project from $10

    La Frite is a new open source development board created by the Libre Computer Project which has this week launched via Kickstarter and offers a miniaturised version of the popular Le Potato SBC supported by mainline Linux and Android 8 operating system.

    La Frite is a modern low power mini PC with four 64-bit cores, and can be equipped with up to a gigabyte of DDR4 RAM, supported by ARM Mali GPU powering high definition HDMI. It is loosely based on the Raspberry Pi Model A+ and maintains similar GPIO header arrangement. Connections on the mini PC include 2 x USB ports and Ethernet.

  • Libre Computer’s La Frite is a $20 single board computer ($5 and up during crowdfunding)

    Libre Computer’s latest Linux-friendly single-board computer features a 1.2 GHz ARM Cortex-A53 quad-core processor, ARM Mali-450 graphics, and a target price of $20 when the Le Frite goes on sale at Amazon later this year.

    But folks who pre-order one through the company’s Kickstarter campaign might be able to score one for as little as $5.

  • Libre sets La Frite mini computer board free

    China's Libre Computer has hit Kickstarter for an alternative to the Raspberry Pi Zero called La Frite. Essentially a smaller version of the company's Le Potato computer board, which also launched on Kickstarter last year, the 2.5 x 2.2 inch (6.4 x 5.5 cm) development board is aimed squarely at makers on a tight budget.

  • A $10 Raspberry Pi alternative? La Frite packs Pi-like specs into low-cost Linux board

    The $10 La Frite comes close to matching some key specs of the $35 Pi 3 B+, using the same underlying Arm-based CPU and even offering faster DDR4 memory.

    On paper, the La Frite also promises comparable video playback performance to the Pi 3 B+, can output to 1080p displays via HDMI 1.4, and offers two USB 2.0 ports.

    As you'd expect for the price there are various cutbacks. The board is missing the Pi 3 B+'s Wi-Fi support, and offers a slightly slower wired Ethernet connection than the Pi 3 B+. While the underlying CPU is the same, a quad-core Arm Cortex A53-based processor, the La Frite's CPU runs slightly slower than the Pi's, 1.2GHz compared to 1.4GHz.

  • Airtame raises $1.26 million in crowdfunding for its wireless HDMI dongle. What is it, and what’s next?

    Danish startup Airtame couldn’t have had a better beginning of the year.

    A relatively obscure company that was started in Copenhagen a mere seven months ago, Airtame kicked off a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo at the end of last year to raise a modest $160,000 to help turn its wireless HDMI dongle into a real product.

    What they got is a lot of attention from media and potential customers, the coveted ‘Best Startup of CES 2014’ award from Engadget, and a lot more capital to work with than they had initially anticipated.

New Wine With Graphics Work/Latest Changes, NVIDIA's GPU Work, and Intel's Work on Mesa

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware
  • Wine Announcement
  • Wine 3.18 Brings FreeType Subpixel Font Rendering, Wine Console DPI Scaling

    A new bi-weekly Wine development release is out for those wanting to try the latest Windows gaming on Linux experience (outside of Steam Play / Proton) or running other Windows applications on Linux and other operating systems.

    The key features of Wine 3.18 include sub-pixel font rendering in conjunction with FreeType 2.8.1+, support for the OAEP algorithm within the RSA encryption code, array marshalling fixes in DCOM, improved DPI scaling for the Wine console, and various bug fixes.

  • NVIDIA Accelerates Server Workloads with RAPIDS GPU Software

    GPUs, or Graphics Process Units, are somewhat of a misnomer in the modern age for many of the applications where there are deployed. While GPUs are an important component for graphics, high-end gaming and design, they are also being widely used to accelerate High Performance Computing (HPC) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) workloads.

    This week, NVIDIA announced its RAPIDS open source software for GPUs, alongside multiple partners, including Oracle, HPE and IBM.

  • Intel Whiskey Lake Support Formally Added To Mesa 18.3

    The recently posted patch for Intel Whiskey Lake support in Mesa has now been merged for Mesa 18.3.

    Intel announced Whiskey Lake and Amber Lake in late August. While Intel is usually many months or even years ahead of schedule with their open-source driver enablement for new graphics generations, Whiskey Lake basically comes down to re-branded Coffeelake UHD Graphics... Some of the PCI IDs in fact have already been present in the Intel Linux driver as reserved Coffeelake PCI IDs.

Community backed Kaby Lake SBC ships with downloadable Ubuntu image

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Hardware
Ubuntu

DFRobot has fulfilled KS orders for its Kaby Lake based LattePanda Alpha SBC, and is shipping a model with 8GB RAM and 64GB eMMC without OS that supports Windows 10 or Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

DFRobot’s LattePanda project has fulfilled its Kickstarter orders for its community-backed, Intel 7th Gen Core based LattePanda Alpha after several months of delays, and public sales have switched from pre-order to in-stock fulfillment for at least one model. Like the earlier, Intel Cherry Trail based LattePanda, the LattePanda Alpha is notable for being a community backed (but not fully open source) hacker board loaded with Windows 10. Yet with the LattePanda Alpha, you can also choose a more affordable barebones version without a Windows 10 key that supports an optimized, downloadable Ubuntu 16.04 LTS image.

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La Frite: A Libre ARM SBC For $5, 10x Faster Than The Raspberry Pi Zero

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Linux
Hardware

The folks at the Libre Computer Project who have successfully released the Tritium, Le Potato, and other ARM SBCs while being as open-source friendly as possible have now announced La Frite.

La Frite is a low-end offering with their 512MB model shipping for just $5 USD or the 1GB version for $10... In other words, aimed squarely at the Raspberry Pi Zero and intended for IoT use-cases and other purposes.

The $5 ARM SBC is said to be 10x faster than the Raspberry Pi Zero plus having real HDMI, Ethernet, and USB ports.

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GPUs and Graphics: Nvidia, X.Org Developers' Conference, vRt and ROCm

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware

Network appliance and ATX board debut AMD’s Epyc Embedded 3000

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Ibase has launched the first network appliance based on AMD’s Epyc Embedded 3000 SoC. The 1U rackmount “FWA8800” appliance features 16 or 32 GbE ports and is built on a new “MBN806” ATX board.

We don’t regularly cover high-end, rackmount network appliances, but we thought this one might be of interest: As promised in February when AMD announced the Xeon-like Epyc Embedded 3000 SoC along with its Ryzen Embedded V1000, Ibase has released the first network appliance based on the Epyc chip. The 1U rackmount FWA8800 network appliance features 2x or 4x NIC slots for up to 16x or 32 GbE ports.

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Google+ and Hyper-Threading (Intel) Compromised

Filed under
Google
Hardware
Security
  • Project Strobe: Protecting your data, improving our third-party APIs, and sunsetting consumer Google+

    Many third-party apps, services and websites build on top of our various services to improve everyone’s phones, working life, and online experience. We strongly support this active ecosystem. But increasingly, its success depends on users knowing that their data is secure, and on developers having clear rules of the road.

  • Google+ Is Shutting Down After Data Breach

    Google has decided to shut down the consumer version of its failed social network Google+. This news comes in the wake of a previously undisclosed security flaw that exposed the data of the profile of users.

    The bug in question remained active between 2015 and 2018, and Google discovered it in March; during this period, the flaw affected more than 500,000 users. However, Google claims to have no evidence that suggests that any external developer or app had access to the data.

  • Google Concealed Data Breach Over Fear Of Repercussions; Shuts Down Google+ Service

    Google opted in the Spring not to disclose that the data of hundreds of thousands of Google+ users had been exposed because the company says they found no evidence of misuse, reports the Wall Street Journal. The Silicon Valley giant feared both regulatory scrutiny and regulatory damage, according to documents reviewed by the Journal and people briefed on the incident.

    In response to being busted, Google parent Alphabet is set to announce broad privacy measures which include permanently shutting down all consumer functionality of Google+, a move which "effectively puts the final nail in the coffin of a product that was launched in 2011 to challenge Facebook, and is widely seen as one of Google's biggest failures."

  • Google+ is Dead, Survived By Better Privacy Controls

    Earlier this year, Google started a project to review third-party developer access to Google accounts through the use of APIs. It found a security breach surrounding Google+, and is now shutting the service down, at least for consumers.

    The long and short of the issue is that there was a security hole that allowed third-party developers to access Google+ users’ account data, including name, email address, occupation, gender, and age—even if the account was set as private.. This isn’t particularly sensitive data, but regardless, a breach is a breach.

    The bug was discovered in March of 2018, but was presumed to have been open since sometime in 2015. To make matters slightly more troubling, Google only keeps this particular API’s data log for two weeks…so the company has no way of knowing which users were affected. Presumably, however, some 500,000 users were on the list.

  • How does TLBleed abuse the Hyper-Threading feature in Intel chips?

    A new side-channel attack called TLBleed abuses the Hyper-Threading feature of Intel chips. Researchers say there is a high success rate of TLBleed exploits, but Intel currently has no plans to patch it. How does TLBleed work, and what are the risks of not patching it?

LoRa gateway and node boards run on Raspberry Pi power

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Pi Supply is Kickstartering Iot LoRa Gateway and IoT LoRa Node pHAT add-ons for the Raspberry Pi, as well as a LoRa Node that works with the Micro:bit. An Arduino node is also in the works.

Pi Supply, which has produced a variety of Raspberry Pi add-on boards including the Papirus E-Paper display and Flick HAT gesture detector, has now returned to Kickstarter to launch a series of IoT LoRa Boards that work with the Pi. The offerings include an IoT LoRa Gateway HAT board starting at an early bird price of 120 UK Pounds ($157) and a LoRa Node pHAT node board with a 25 Pound ($33) early bird price.

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'Open' Hardware: LinuxBoot and OpenPOWER

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • LinuxBoot for Servers: Enter Open Source, Goodbye Proprietary UEFI

    LinuxBoot is an Open Source alternative to Proprietary UEFI firmware. It was released last year and is now being increasingly preferred by leading hardware manufacturers as default firmware. Last year, LinuxBoot was warmly welcomed into the Open Source family by The Linux Foundation.

    This project was an initiative by Ron Minnich, author of LinuxBIOS and lead of coreboot at Google, in January 2017.

    Google, Facebook, Horizon Computing Solutions, and Two Sigma collaborated together to develop the LinuxBoot project (formerly called NERF) for server machines based on Linux.

  • Raptor Computing Reveals More Details About Their Blackbird Low-Cost POWER9 Board

    This week at the OpenPOWER Summit Amsterdam, Texas-based libre computer vendor Raptor Computing Systems announced Blackbird as a low-cost, micro-ATX POWER9 motherboard to be available in the coming months. The company has now revealed some additional details.

Apple Wipes

Filed under
Hardware
Mac
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More in Tux Machines

OSS/Microsoft Openwashing Leftovers

Brave and Firefox Latest

  • Brave Browser Team Up With Tor
     

    TOR [sic] or The Onion Router uses technology that separates your computer from the website you’re viewing by routing the network traffic through 3 seperate servers before it reaches your computer. That being said Brave Core Beta hasn’t been fully tested yet so “users should not rely on it for serious use just yet,” Brave said.

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  • Your RSS is grass: Mozilla euthanizes feed reader, Atom code in Firefox browser, claims it's old and unloved
    When Firefox 64 arrives in December, support for RSS, the once celebrated content syndication scheme, and its sibling, Atom, will be missing. "After considering the maintenance, performance and security costs of the feed preview and subscription features in Firefox, we’ve concluded that it is no longer sustainable to keep feed support in the core of the product," said Gijs Kruitbosch, a software engineer who works on Firefox at Mozilla, in a blog post on Thursday. RSS – which stands for Rich Site Summary, RDF Site Summary, or Really Simple Syndication, as you see fit – is an XML-based format for publishing and subscribing to web content feeds. It dates back to 1999 and for a time was rather popular, but been disappearing from a variety of applications and services since then. Mozilla appears to have gotten the wrecking ball rolling in 2011 when it removed the RSS button from Firefox. The explanation then was the same as it is now: It's just not very popular.
  • Cameron Kaiser: It's baaaaa-aaack: TenFourFox Intel
    It's back! It's undead! It's ugly! It's possibly functional! It's totally unsupported! It's ... TenFourFox for Intel Macs! Years ago as readers of this blog will recall, Claudio Leite built TenFourFox 17.0.2 for Intel, which the update check-in server shows some determined users are still running to this day on 10.5 and even 10.4 despite various problems such as issue 209. However, he didn't have time to maintain it, and a newer version was never built, though a few people since then have made various attempts and submitted some patches. One of these attempts is now far enough along to the point where I'm permitted to announce its existence. Riccardo Mottola has done substantial work on getting TenFourFox to build and run again on old Intel Macs with a focus on 32-bit compatibility, and his patches have been silently lurking in the source code repository for some time. Along with Ken Cunningham's additional work, who now also has a MacPorts portfile so you can build it yourself (PowerPC support in the portfile is coming, though you can still use the official instructions, of course), enough functions in the new Intel build that it can be used for basic tasks.

Security: 'Smart' Locks, Windows in Weapons

Android Leftovers