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Hardware

FOSS in 3D Printing

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Hardware
OSS
  • Open source wifi enabled 3D printer controller Franklin speeds up with new release

    3D printing hit the mainstream a few years ago thanks in part to the open-source 3D printer market. The origins of this transition had to do with expiring patents held by the traditionally held commercial 3D printing companies. Since then, several small businesses have sprung up around the emerging low-cost 3D printer market. Some of these companies embraced the open-source mentality, while others are seeking shelter with patents.

  • Hackaday Prize Entry: Open-Source Myoelectric Hand Prosthesis

    Hands can grab things, build things, communicate, and we control them intuitively with nothing more than a thought. To those who miss a hand, a prosthesis can be a life-changing tool for carrying out daily tasks. We are delighted to see that [Alvaro Villoslada] joined the Hackaday Prize with his contribution to advanced prosthesis technology: Dextra, the open-source myoelectric hand prosthesis.

  • BCN3D Technologies releases open source files for BCN3D Sigma 3D printer

    As our readers will know, an important part of the 3D printing community is the idea of accessibility. Of course, it is more than just an idea, as everyday makers around the world share their 3D designs and models for free, and even 3D printing companies exercise an open-source philosophy with DIY 3D printers and accessible models. Recently, Barcelona based 3D printer developer BCN3D Technologies decided to further embrace the additive manufacturing open-source philosophy with their latest initiative, Open Source 360º. As part of the initiative, the company has announced that it will share all of its engineering, design, and fabrication information used in the manufacturing of their flagship product, the BCN3D Sigma 3D printer.

  • Shellmo: Aquatic 3D printed robot for fun and education

    Recently I came across a very interesting open hardware project called Shellmo. What caught my eye was that it's a 3D printed crustacean that seems to have no apparent real world use, though with a little creativity I can see educational implications.

    Shellmo is a unique, almost cartoon-like creatures that could captivate the imagination of children while at the same time affording them an opportunity to 3D print their own robot. With the current emphasis on STEM in education, Shellmo appears to be the kind of project that would stimulate student interest.

Hardware/Linux

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Linux
Hardware

$1 Open Source Hacking Board Is Here For Programming And Electronics

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Development
Hardware

To make the process of learning programming and DIYing easier and cheaper, One Dollar Board’s crowdfunding campaign has arrived on Indiegogo. The team behind the project aims to make the board available at a price of $1 + shipping all across the world, with a focus on developing countries.

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FCC vs. FOSS

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Hardware
OSS

Hardware/Linux

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Android
Linux
Hardware

Hardware Modding/Hacking/Security

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Hardware
Security
  • Libreboot on my X60s
  • Nexenta to Showcase Market Leading Open Source-Driven Software-Defined Storage Solutions at Cloud Expo Europe, London
  • Cybersecurity education isn't good, nobody is shocked

    There was a news story published last week about the almost total lack of cybersecurity attention in undergraduate education. Most people in the security industry won't be surprised by this. In the majority of cases when the security folks have to talk to developers, there is a clear lack of understanding about security.

  • Making it easier to deploy TPMTOTP on non-EFI systems

    On EFI systems you can handle this by sticking the secret in an EFI variable (there's some special-casing in the code to deal with the additional metadata on the front of things you read out of efivarfs). But that's not terribly useful if you're not on an EFI system. Thankfully, there's a way around this. TPMs have a small quantity of nvram built into them, so we can stick the secret there. If you pass the -n argument to sealdata, that'll happen. The unseal apps will attempt to pull the secret out of nvram before falling back to looking for a file, so things should just magically work.

  • 6 steps to calculate ROI for an open hardware project

    Free and open source software advocates have courageously blazed a trail that is now being followed by those interested in open source for physical objects. It's called free and open source hardware (FOSH), and we're seeing an exponential rise in the number of free designs for hardware released under opensource licenses, Creative Commons licenses,or placed in the public domain.

An open source microprocessor for wearables

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Hardware
OSS

Open Hardware

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Hardware
OSS
  • First Open Source GPU Could Change Future of Computing

    Nyami is significant in the research, computing and open source communities because it marks the first time open source has been used to design a GPU, as well as the first time a research team was able to test how different hardware and software configurations affect GPU performance. The results of the experiments the researchers performed are now part of the open source community, and that work will help others follow in the original research team’s footsteps. According to Timothy Miller, a computer science assistant professor at Binghamton, as others create their own GPUs using open source, it will push computing power to the next level.

  • We are happy to share our FREE and OPEN-SOURCE microprocessor system PULPino!

    Not a toy design: PULPino is a mature design: it has been taped-out as an ASIC in UMC 65nm in January 2016. The PULPino platform is available for RTL simulation as well for FPGA mapping. It has full debug support on all targets. In addition we support extended profiling with source code annotated execution times through KCacheGrind in RTL simulations.

    And it is free, no registration, no strings attached, you can use it, change it, adapt it, add to your own chip, use it for classes, research, projects, products… We just ask you to acknowledge the source, and if possible, let us know what you like and what you like and don’t like.

  • Wiring was Arduino before Arduino

    Hernando Barragán is the grandfather of Arduino of whom you’ve never heard. And after years now of being basically silent on the issue of attribution, he’s decided to get some of his grudges off his chest and clear the air around Wiring and Arduino. It’s a long read, and at times a little bitter, but if you’ve been following the development of the Arduino vs Arduino debacle, it’s an important piece in the puzzle.

Hardware Modding/Hacking

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Hardware
  • Open Source Hardware is an opportunity for Synthetic Biology research – the DocuBricks approach by Tobias Wenzel

    There is a lesson to be learned from the incompleteness of commercial assembly-set documentations: Open Source Hardware is more than an assembly instruction. It is also about documenting design files and decisions along its functionality and in a modular fashion, complete with testing and calibration instructions. A good documentation enables the project to grow and improve without the doing of the inventor. Only in this way most projects can enfold their benefit well to society and technology companies. To be sure, documenting a hardware project is not easy and requires time. For this reason a handful scientists at the University of Cambridge (including the author), all with a background in technology and biology, recently started the DocuBricks initiative. DocuBricks is an open source and free software that makes documenting hardware and usage procedures easier. The name is a reference to modularity in the same way as Lego or BioBricks. As the name suggests, the editor part of the software guides the user through a modular documentation structure with relevant fields in a standardised, yet general format. The user can create a hierarchy of documentation bricks, explaining their function, implementation and assembly while referring to a parts library. The result is a XML document and a folder with construction and media files that is displayed with the viewer part of the software (a style sheet and script to enable interactivity).

  • Kicad hacking - Intra-sheet links and ERC

    I spent time looking at gEDA and Eagle when I wanted to get back into hardware hacking for my own ends; but neither did I really click with. On the other hand, a mere 10 minutes with Kicad and I knew I had found the tool I wanted to work with long-term.

  • Open-Source System 3D Prints from Custom Powders

    An open-source laser sintering printer has been used to print intricate 3D objects from powdered plastics and biomaterials. The system costs a fraction of equivalent commercial systems and could give researchers a DIY technique for working with their own specialized materials.

Raspberry Pi 3 Debut

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Linux
Hardware
  • Raspberry Pi 3 on sale now at $35

    Exactly four years ago, on 29 February 2012, we unleashed the original 256MB Raspberry Pi Model B on a largely unsuspecting world. Since then, we’ve shipped over eight million units, including three million units of Raspberry Pi 2, making us the UK’s all-time best-selling computer. The Raspberry Pi Foundation has grown from a handful of volunteers to have over sixty full-time employees, including our new friends from Code Club. We’ve sent a Raspberry Pi to the International Space Station and are training teachers around the world through our Picademy program.

  • Raspberry Pi 3 has Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, 64-bit chip, still just $35

    The third major version of the Raspberry Pi will go on sale Monday, with the $35/£30 credit card-sized Raspberry Pi 3 Model B now sporting a 64-bit processor and embedded Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

    In previous versions, the Pi needed USB adapters to get Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity. Raspberry Pi 3 supports 802.11n Wi-Fi (2.4GHz only) and Bluetooth 4.0 without an adapter, freeing up its four USB ports for other purposes.

  • Raspberry Pi 3 with 64-bit quad-core SoC, built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth announced for $35

    Months after introducing its most affordable Raspberry Pi Zero, the company has introduced the Raspberry Pi 3, successor of the Raspberry Pi 2 that was introduced back in February last year. Even though it is in the same size and has much of the same components on board as the Pi 2, the new Pi 3 has a faster 64-bit quad-core Broadcom BCM2837 SoC with ARM Cortex-A53 CPU, has built-in Wi-Fi 802.11n and Bluetooth 4.1.Months after introducing its most affordable Raspberry Pi Zero, the company has introduced the Raspberry Pi 3, successor of the Raspberry Pi 2 that was introduced back in February last year. Even though it is in the same size and has much of the same components on board as the Pi 2, the new Pi 3 has a faster 64-bit quad-core Broadcom BCM2837 SoC with ARM Cortex-A53 CPU, has built-in Wi-Fi 802.11n and Bluetooth 4.1.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • systemd 233 about to be released, please help testing
    systemd 233 is scheduled to be released next week, and there is only a handful of small issues left. As usual there are tons of improvements and fixes, but the most intrusive one probably is another attempt to move from legacy cgroup v1 to a “hybrid” setup where the new unified (cgroup v2) hierarchy is mounted at /sys/fs/cgroup/unified/ and the legacy one stays at /sys/fs/cgroup/ as usual. This should provide an easier path for software like Docker or LXC to migrate to the unified hiearchy, but even that hybrid mode broke some bits.
  • Keep : A personal shell command keeper
    Introducing a new command line tool which solves the issue of memorizing commands or storing them somewhere which is difficult to find. With the grep and run commands, one can easily find their long forgotten commands and use them them right away.
  • qutebrowser v0.10.0 released
    I'm happy to annouce the release of qutebrowser v0.10.0! qutebrowser is a keyboard driven browser with a vim-like, minimalistic interface. It's written using PyQt and cross-platform. I haven't announced the v0.9.0 release in this blog (or any patch releases), but for v0.10.0 it definitely makes sense to do so, as it's mostly centered on QtWebEngine!
  • GNOME Pomodoro: A Pomodoro Timer With AppIndicator And GNOME Shell Support
    GNOME Pomodoro is, like the name suggests, a Pomodoro timer for GNOME. The application website mentions that it's currently only for GNOME Shell, however, an AppIndicator is also available.
  • 7 Awesome Open Source Build Automation Tools For Sysadmin/DevOps/Developers
    Build automation is a vital tool for devops, sysadmins, and developers. It is nothing but scripting or automating the process of compiling source code into binary. Sysadmins can use build tools to manage and update config files. Following is a list of awesome open source and popular tools associated with automating build processes on Linux or Unix-like system.

Android Leftovers

Security Leftovers

  • Major Cloudflare bug leaked sensitive data from customers’ websites
    Cloudflare revealed a serious bug in its software today that caused sensitive data like passwords, cookies, authentication tokens to spill in plaintext from its customers’ websites. The announcement is a major blow for the content delivery network, which offers enhanced security and performance for more than 5 million websites. This could have allowed anyone who noticed the error to collect a variety of very personal information that is typically encrypted or obscured.
  • SHA1 collisions make Git vulnerable to attakcs by third-parties, not just repo maintainers
    After sitting through an endless flood of headless-chicken messages on multiple media about SHA-1 being fatally broken, I thought I'd do a quick writeup about what this actually means.
  • Torvalds patches git to mitigate against SHA-1 attacks
    Linux creator Linus Torvalds says two sets of patches have been posted for the distributed version control system git to mitigate against SHA-1 attacks which are based on the method that Dutch and Google engineers detailed last week. The post by Torvalds detailing this came after reports emerged of the version control system used by the WebKit browser engine repository becoming corrupted after the two proof-of-concept PDF files that were released by the Dutch and Google researchers were uploaded to the repository.
  • Linus Torvalds on "SHA1 collisions found"
  • More from Torvalds on SHA1 collisions
    I thought I'd write an update on git and SHA1, since the SHA1 collision attack was so prominently in the news. Quick overview first, with more in-depth explanation below: (1) First off - the sky isn't falling. There's a big difference between using a cryptographic hash for things like security signing, and using one for generating a "content identifier" for a content-addressable system like git. (2) Secondly, the nature of this particular SHA1 attack means that it's actually pretty easy to mitigate against, and there's already been two sets of patches posted for that mitigation. (3) And finally, there's actually a reasonably straightforward transition to some other hash that won't break the world - or even old git repositories.
  • [Older] Wire’s independent security review
    Ever since Wire launched end-to-end encryption and open sourced its apps one question has consistently popped up: “Is there an independent security review available?” Well, there is now!
  • Malware Lets a Drone Steal Data by Watching a Computer’s Blinking LED
  • FCC to halt rule that protects your private data from security breaches
    The Federal Communications Commission plans to halt implementation of a privacy rule that requires ISPs to protect the security of its customers' personal information. The data security rule is part of a broader privacy rulemaking implemented under former Chairman Tom Wheeler but opposed by the FCC's new Republican majority. The privacy order's data security obligations are scheduled to take effect on March 2, but Chairman Ajit Pai wants to prevent that from happening. The data security rule requires ISPs and phone companies to take "reasonable" steps to protect customers' information—such as Social Security numbers, financial and health information, and Web browsing data—from theft and data breaches. "Chairman Pai is seeking to act on a request to stay this rule before it takes effect on March 2," an FCC spokesperson said in a statement to Ars.
  • Google releases details of another Windows bug
  • How to secure the IoT in your organisation: advice and best practice for securing the Internet of Things
    All of the major technology vendors are making a play in the Internet of Things space and there are few organisations that won’t benefit from collecting and analysing the vast array of new data that will be made available. But the recent Mirai botnet is just one example of the tremendous vulnerabilities that exist with unsecured access points. What are the main security considerations and best practices, then, for businesses seeking to leverage the potential of IoT?

GNOME News

  • FEDORA and GNOME at UNSAAC
    Today I did a talk to introduce students of UNSAAC to the Fedora and GNOME world as it was announced by the GDG Cusco group. We started at 8:30 am and it was a free event:
  • GNOME Theme For Firefox Gets Updated, Looking Great
    There are a lot of complete themes for Firefox. We spoke about 3 of them in one of our previous articles. The good news today is that “GNOME 3” theme (which was also called Adwaita) for Firefox was updated. Now it’s working with all versions higher than Firefox 45. Previously, the theme didn’t work with the recent versions of Firefox. So people had to switch to other available themes. Fortunately, this finally changed today when another developer took the code, fixed the compatibility problems and re-released the theme.
  • GStreamer Now Supports Multi-Threaded Scaling/Conversion For Big Performance Win
    With the addition of over two thousand lines of code, GStreamer's video-convert code within gst-plugins-base is now properly multi-threaded. Video scaling and conversion can now be multi-threaded when using GStreamer. With this multi-threading work by Sebastian Dröge, he commented with the commit, "During tests, this gave up to 1.8x speedup with 2 threads and up to 3.2x speedup with 4 threads when converting e.g. 1080p to 4k in v210."