Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Hardware

See How Your Linux System Performs Against The Latest Intel/AMD CPUs

Filed under
Hardware

This holiday weekend (in the US) can be a great time to test your Linux system to see how it's performing against the latest AMD and Intel processors to see if it's time for a good upgrade.

This weekend I'm working on many Linux CPU benchmarks for the upcoming Linux review of the Intel Core i7 5960X Haswell-E system (still waiting for Intel's review sample to arrive though...) and also have some other hardware in preparation for an unrelated launch that's happening next week from another vendor. I'm testing several different Intel/AMD CPUs from the latest desktop CPUs to the Extreme Edition models to some slightly older parts. Beyond the raw performance results are also the power consumption data and much more.

Read more

MSI Motherboard BIOS Updating Remains A Pain For Linux Users

Filed under
Hardware

In recent years with more motherboard vendors enabling the updating of the BIOS/UEFI from within the setup utility itself and support loading the BIOS file off a USB thumb drive or other storage, it's generally easier for Linux users and all around a smoother process than the days of having to make a MS-DOS start-up floppy disk or similar. For most of these BIOS updates, Windows is generally not required as you can just head on over to the vendor's web-site, download a zipped up copy of the BIOS, transfer it to a USB drive, and reboot into the UEFI setup utility and flash away.

Some vendors will package their BIOS file inside an EXE that has to be executed that will then extract the file right away, but fortunately there's many programs capable of straightaway extracting the files from the EXE or the worst case scenario is generally just running the EXE under Wine. As a Linux user, with MSI motherboards their BIOS packaging takes it to an additional level of annoying and for some Linux users could be show-stopping.

Read more

Intel Beignet Is Working Out Surprisingly Well For OpenCL On Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware
OSS

Beignet is the project out of Intel's Open-Source Technology Center for exposing GPGPU/compute capabilities out of Ivy Bridge hardware and newer when using a fully open-source Linux stack. While Beignet differs greatly from Gallium3D's Clover state tracker, this Intel-specific open-source OpenCL implementation is working out quite well for Ubuntu Linux.

While I've been writing about Intel's Beignet project since early 2013, it's probably been about a year now since I tried out the code, which is developed by Intel's OTC graphics team in China. This weekend I tried out Beignet v0.9.2 as trying out the newest Intel OpenCL code has been on my TODO list for a while and it's been working out rather well in my initial tests.

Read more

Getting Involved With The New Raspberry Pi Graphics Driver

Filed under
Hardware

Eric Anholt, formerly a lead developer on Intel's Linux graphics driver, has been quickly working away at the VC4 Gallium3D driver and related code now being a Broadcom employee tasked with making an open-source driver for the Raspberry Pi. If you're looking to try out his in-development driver or help him out in the driver creation process, he's published a brief guide to lower the barrier to entry.

Eric published a blog post on Friday that covers the steps for building a Linux kernel that has the VC4 driver, building mainline Mesa with the VC4 driver, and also building Piglit for carrying out regression tests.

Read more

A New AMD Catalyst Linux Driver Unofficially Surfaces

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

A German web-site is hosting a yet to be officially released Catalyst Linux driver.

As pointed out in our forums there is a new Catalyst Linux driver version that's being hosted by Computerbase.de. This driver is marked Catalyst 14.201.1008 and was uploaded today for Linux along with Windows.

While this driver should work for any supported hardware (Radeon HD 5000 series and newer), it's labeled amd-catalyst-desktop-apu-linux-x86-x86-64-14.201.1008.zip. The driver version number is higher than the previous publicly released Catalyst Linux build available from AMD's web-site.

Read more

MIPS tempts hackers with Raspbery Pi-like dev board

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

Hard to choose between Raspberry Pi, BeagleBone Black, and MinnowBoard Max? Now there’s another choice: the open source MIPS-based “Creator CI20″ dev board.

In a bid to harness some of the energy and enthusiasm swirling around today’s open, hackable single board computers Imagination Technologies, licensor of the MIPS ISA, has unveiled the ISA’s counter to ARM’s popular Raspberry Pi and BeagleBone Black SBCs. These days, every processor vendor simply must have a community supported dev board in order to engage with the developer communities. (Incidentally, Intel’s is the MinnowBoard Max and AMD’s is the Gizmo.)

Read more

Device Tree Overlay Support Lands Upstream

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Pantelis Antoniou originated device tree overlay support for the purpose of enabling dynamic hardware configuration under Linux on devices like BeagleBone that use device tree for hardware configuration. Device tree was introduced to Linux for the purpose of putting the description of hardware into data structures, rather than building it up programmatically, greatly reducing the amount of code required to be maintained within the Linux kernel sources. Until now, the device tree data structure was only processed at boot time and that simply can't work for devices that might change hardware configurations after boot. While many BeagleBone capes can be probed by the bootloader, a common use-case is hardware that is reconfigurable. The most obvious example is a cape with an FPGA on it.

Read more

Re-Clocking Your NVIDIA GPU With Nouveau On Linux 3.17

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

If you are trying to re-clock your NVIDIA GPU with the Nouveau driver when using the Linux 3.17 kernel, there's an extra step involved, but still your mileage may vary and the re-clocking is still mostly for Kepler GPUs.

With the Nouveau driver changes for Linux 3.17 there are no magic breakthroughs when it comes to re-clocking -- allowing the GPU's core and memory clocks to run at their rated frequencies and voltages rather than any (often much lower) values programmed by the video BIOS at boot time. With Linux 3.17 came re-clocking for Kepler GPUs and now it works, but generally not all performance levels/states properly function. If you are running a GeForce 400/500 "Fermi" GPU or other generations of NVIDIA hardware aside from the few integrated mobile chipsets, chances are you're out of luck in being able to tap the full potential of the GPU when using this open-source, reverse-engineered NVIDIA GPU.

Read more

Eltechs Debuts x86 Crossover Platform for ARM Tablets, Mini-PCs

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Software

The product, called ExaGear Desktop, runs x86 operating systems on top of hardware devices using ARMv7 CPUs. That's significant because x86 software, which is the kind that runs natively on most computing platforms today, does not generally work on ARM hardware unless software developers undertake the considerable effort of porting it. Since few are likely to do that, having a way to run x86 applications on ARM devices is likely to become increasingly important as more ARM-based tablets and portable computers come to market.

That said, the ExaGear Desktop, which Eltechs plans to make available next month, currently has some steep limitations. First, it only supports Ubuntu Linux. And while Eltechs said support for additional Linux distributions is forthcoming, there's no indication the product will be able to run x86 builds of Windows on ARM hardware, a feat that is likely to be in much greater demand than Linux compatibility.

Read more

The Many Things You Can Build With A Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat
Hardware

Ruth Suehle and Tom Callaway are presenting at LinuxCon 2014 Chicago tomorrow about many different Raspberry Pi hacks and other Linux capabilities of these low-cost, low-performance single board computers.

The two Fedora contributors cover the back-story of the Raspberry Pi for anyone that's been sleeping under a rock, how to go about getting parts for the RPi, and the process to get Linux running on the ~$35 ARMv6 system. With Linux running on the Raspberry Pi, the possibilities are nearly endless for this low-cost development-friendly board.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Xiaomi is rumored to be working on a Laptop... running Linux!
  • Xiaomi aims to knock Apple off its branch with move into computers
  • Xiaomi's Macbook Pro killer will run Linux
    Xiaomi is known for its popular clones of Apple's iPhone and iPad. Now the Chinese company is rumored to be working on a Linux-based alternative to Apple's Macbook Pro laptop.
  • Acer Announces Predator 8 Gaming Tablet With Intel Atom x7 And Android 5.1
  • Acer Predator 8: A $299 Android gaming tablet
    Acer is launching its first Android tablet designed for gaming. The company’s been showing off the device for months, but now it’s official: the Acer Predator 8 is a tablet with an 8-inch IPS display, an Intel Atom x7 Cherry Trail processor, and a $299 price tag.
  • Acer Launch New $299 Convertible Chromebook
  • Acer offers convertible Chromebook for $299
    Chromebooks have been burning up the sales charts on Amazon. And now convertible Chromebooks seem to be where the market is headed. Acer has jumped on the convertible bandwagon by announcing the Chromebook R11. This new model offers notebook and tablet functionality built into one Chromebook.
  • Linux Foundation is giving away Chromebooks
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization that sponsors Linus Torvalds and runs many programs to accelerate the growth of Linux, is now giving away free Chromebooks to those who enroll in one of its training courses during September. Free Chromebook. To everyone. Throughout September. The foundation has chosen Dell’s Chromebook 11 for this program. The $299 Chromebook features a 11.6" display, is powered by 1.4Ghz processor, and comes with 4GB of RAM.
  • CloudRouter now live
    The collaborative open-source CloudRouter project has come out of beta.
  • Linux Kernel Engineer opportunity at Collabora!
    Collabora is a software consultancy specialising in bringing companies and the open source software community together and it is currently looking for a Core Software Engineer, that works in the Linux kernel and/or all the plumbing around the kernel. In this role the engineer will be part of worldwide team who works with our clients to solve their Linux kernel and low level stack technical problems.
  • DevOps: An Introduction
    Not too long ago, software development was done a little differently. We programmers would each have our own computer, and we would write code that did the usual things a program should do, such as read and write files, respond to user events, save data to a database, and so on. Most of the code ran on a single computer, except for the database server, which was usually a separate computer. To interact with the database, our code would specify the name or address of the database server along with credentials and other information, and we would call into a library that would do the hard work of communicating with the server. So, from the perspective of the code, everything took place locally. We would call a function to get data from a table, and the function would return with the data we asked for. Yes, there were plenty of exceptions, but for many application-based desktop applications, this was the general picture.
  • The Comparison and Context of Unikernels and Containers
    Talk about unikernels is starting to gain momentum. Still, these are such early days for this technology that implements the bare minimum of the traditional operating system functions. Its functionality is a topic we discussed last month in a post by Russell Pavlicek of Citrix. As Pavlicek wrote, unikernels implement the bare minimum of the traditional operating system functions — just enough to enable the application it powers.
  • FISH – A smart and user-friendly command line shell for Linux
  • This is what we do if someone offers us some constructive criticism
    We in KDE don’t ignore constructive feedback, so at Akademy, we set out to find solutions to the issues he pointed out. In order to maximize the reach of our efforts’ documentation, I decided to write a two-part series about it over at Linux Veda, a “web-magazine to share and spread knowledge about Linux and Open Source technologies” which has always been very interested in – and generally supportive of – KDE.
  • Calligra 2.9.7 Open-Source Office Suite Adds Multiple Kexi and Krita Improvements
  • [Krita] Updating the Shop!
  • GNOME 3.18 Beta 2 Officially Released, Final Version Coming on September 23
    The GNOME Project sent an email to Softpedia a few minutes ago, informing us of the release of the second Beta build of the upcoming GNOME 3.18 desktop environment, due for release on September 23, 2015.
  • Why Samsung’s new smartwatch doesn’t run Android
    Samsung has released some more information on its next generation of smartwatches, the Gear S2. Unlike most of the spate of non-Apple watches being released this week, it’s not running Android Wear. Instead, Samsung has opted to continue using Tizen, the Linux-based operating system that powers its smart TVs and some phones in India.
  • How to Make Unbreakable Passwords In Your Head Using Mental Cryptography
    You're supposed to have distinct passwords for every one of your different accounts, and, what's more, those passwords are supposed to be difficult. Use some numbers and symbols and weird capitalization, they tell us. But it's hard, and so we wind up just using the same password for everything and taking the risk.
  • Thursday's security advisories

today's howtos

Leftovers: Gaming

Leftovers: Red Hat