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Hardware

Intel Publishes Open-Source "Skylake" Mesa Graphics Driver Support

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware

Earlier this month Intel published initial Skylake Linux graphics support for their DRM kernel driver. Today they have released the Mesa 3D driver support for Skylake, their next-generation architecture coming out by the end of 2015 to succeed Broadwell.

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What Linux Users Should Know About Open Hardware

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Business and free software have been intertwined for years, but the two often misunderstand one another. That's not surprising -- what is just a business to one is way of life for the other. But the misunderstanding can be painful, which is why debunking it is a worth the effort.

An increasingly common case in point: the growing attempts at open hardware, whether from Canonical, Jolla, MakePlayLive, or any of half a dozen others. Whether pundit or end-user, the average free software user reacts with exaggerated enthusiasm when a new piece of hardware is announced, then retreats into disillusionment as delay follows delay, often ending in the cancellation of the entire product.

It's a cycle that does no one any good, and often breeds distrust – and all because the average Linux user has no idea what's happening behind the news.

My own experience with bringing products to market is long behind me. However, nothing I have heard suggests that anything has changed. Bringing open hardware or any other product to market remains not just a brutal business, but one heavily stacked against newcomers.

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Samsung launches the Industry’s first 28-Megapixel APS-C CMOS Image Sensor – S5KVB2

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Samsung, with the launch of the Tizen Samsung NX1 Smart Camera, has introduced a new 28 megapixel (MP) APS-C CMOS image sensor for digital cameras, which is said to offer superior light absorption thanks to the back-side illuminated (BSI) pixel technology and 65-nanometer (nm) low-power copper process.

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Canonical Partners with AMD for Ubuntu OpenStack Cloud Server

Filed under
Server
Hardware
Ubuntu

Canonical, the lead commercial sponsor behind the open-source Ubuntu Linux distribution is ramping up its OpenStack efforts thanks to a new server solution from AMD.

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Edison IoT module ships with Atom/Quark combo SoC

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Intel launched its Edison COM for IoT apps, with a “Tangier” SoC that mixes a dual-core Atom running Linux with a Quark chip, plus optional breakout boards.

Intel’s tiny Edison computer-on-module for wearables and other Internet of Things applications is finally available for $50, along with two Intel development boards plus an array of third-party expansion boards from SparkFun. According to Jim Chase, product manager for the Intel Edison and Galileo platform hardware and ecosystems, the 35.5 x 25 x 3.9mm Edison module integrates a new system-on-chip codenamed “Tangier,” a stripped down version of Intel’s Atom Z34xx (“Merrifield”), a 22nm “Silvermont” processor, typically aimed at smartphones.

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Intel's Core i7 5960X Is Fast & Wonderful Under Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

After my first X99 motherboard burned up in a strange situation, since yesterday my Core i7 5960X Haswell-E system started working wonderfully with Linux after using a different motherboard. I've been hammering the system hard for the past day and no X99/i7-5960X issues have come about (albeit I've refrained from doing any overclocking or DDR4 tweaking yet) and this high-end $1000+ (USD) CPU is running great under Linux.

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More Nouveau Re-Clocking Patches Published

Filed under
Hardware

A few weeks back Roy posted improved re-clocking code for NVA3 GPUs. Today his latest set of patches work on memory re-clocking improvements for DDR2/DDR3 hardware. The patches also implement wait-for-vblank to remove flickering during memory re-clocking, improvements for reducing the downtime of PFIFO pauses, etc. These patches are prep work for the actual memory re-clocking code that he says will follow later.

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Trying Intel OpenCL On Linux For Video Encoding

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
OSS

The open-source x264 program does support OpenCL acceleration -- when building x264 it will check for the presence of OpenCL development support and then at runtime the --opencl switch must be passed for exploiting the potential of any OpenCL hardware. The x264 test profile part of the Phoronix Test Suite is strictly intended for CPU-based testing so this weekend I added a x264-opencl test profile that uses the same revision of x264 and the same media file, but the only difference is that it forces OpenCL support. So now with the Phoronix Test Suite it's as easy as running phoronix-test-suite benchmark x264 x264-opencl to run the CPU-bound x264 and the OpenCL version for easy comparison purposes.

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Preview: AMD's FX-9590 Eight-Core At Up To 5.0GHz On Linux

Filed under
Hardware

Since last year AMD's had the FX-9590 as the top-end Vishera CPU that can top out at 5.0GHz with its Turbo Frequency, but initially this processor was only available to OEM system builds. Over time the OEM version of the FX-9590 became available to consumers while earlier this summer AMD launched a retail version of the FX-9590 that included the eight-core CPU with a closed-loop water cooling solution. Today we're reviewing this highest-end Vishera CPU to see how it compares to other AMD and Intel processors on Ubuntu Linux.

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See How Your Linux System Performs Against The Latest Intel/AMD CPUs

Filed under
Hardware

This holiday weekend (in the US) can be a great time to test your Linux system to see how it's performing against the latest AMD and Intel processors to see if it's time for a good upgrade.

This weekend I'm working on many Linux CPU benchmarks for the upcoming Linux review of the Intel Core i7 5960X Haswell-E system (still waiting for Intel's review sample to arrive though...) and also have some other hardware in preparation for an unrelated launch that's happening next week from another vendor. I'm testing several different Intel/AMD CPUs from the latest desktop CPUs to the Extreme Edition models to some slightly older parts. Beyond the raw performance results are also the power consumption data and much more.

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More in Tux Machines

Developer lowers Drupal's barrier to entry

From a consumer perspective, I'd like open source to be ubiquitous to the point of invisibility. Using recent Ubuntu distros, I'm always shocked at how professional the environment feels. Just five years ago, you'd need to hunt down drivers and do a bunch of fiddling to get basic things like a sound card working. Now there are so many pushbutton ways to deploy open source tech, from OSes to CMS distros on Pantheon to buying an Android-powered mobile phone. We're not quite to the point where CMS users can feel like open source is transparent; there's still a huge investment in vendors to give you the expertise to manage your Drupal or WordPress site, for example. But we're closer than we were a decade ago, and that's pretty exciting. Read more

Intel invests $60 million in drone venture

Intel is investing $60 million in UAV firm Yuneec, whose prosumer “Typhoon” drones use Android-based controllers. Intel Corp. CEO Brian Krzanich and Yuneec International CEO Tian Yu took to YouTube to announce an Intel investment of more than $60 million in the Hong Kong based company to help develop drone technology. No more details were provided except for Krzanich’s claim that “We’ve got drones on our road map that are going to truly change the world and revolutionize the industry.” One possibility is that Intel plans to equip the drones with its RealSense 3D cameras (see farther below). Read more

today's howtos

Security Leftovers

  • London Calling: Two-Factor Authentication Phishing From Iran
    This report describes an elaborate phishing campaign against targets in Iran’s diaspora, and at least one Western activist. The ongoing attacks attempt to circumvent the extra protections conferred by two-factor authentication in Gmail, and rely heavily on phone-call based phishing and “real time” login attempts by the attackers. Most of the attacks begin with a phone call from a UK phone number, with attackers speaking in either English or Farsi. The attacks point to extensive knowledge of the targets’ activities, and share infrastructure and tactics with campaigns previously linked to Iranian threat actors. We have documented a growing number of these attacks, and have received reports that we cannot confirm of targets and victims of highly similar attacks, including in Iran. The report includes extra detail to help potential targets recognize similar attacks. The report closes with some security suggestions, highlighting the importance of two-factor authentication.
  • Ins0mnia: Unlimited Background Time and Covert Execution on Non-Jailbroken iOS Devices
    FireEye mobile researchers discovered a security vulnerability that allowed an iOS application to continue to run, for an unlimited amount of time, even if the application was terminated by the user and not visible in the task switcher. This flaw allowed any iOS application to bypass Apple background restrictions. We call this vulnerability Ins0mnia.
  • Why is the smart home insecure? Because almost nobody cares
    It's easy to laugh-and-point at Samsung over its latest smart-thing disaster: after all, it should have already learned its lesson from the Smart TV debacle, right? Except, of course, that wherever you see “Smart Home”, “Internet of Things”, “cloud” and “connected” in the same press release, there's a security debacle coming. It might be Nest, WeMo, security systems, or home gateways – but it's all the same.
  • Critical PayPal XSS vulnerability left accounts open to attack
    PayPal has patched a security vulnerability which could have been used by hackers to steal users' login details, as well as to access unencrypted credit card information. A cross site scripting bug was discovered by Egyptian 'vulnerabilities hunter' Ebrahim Hegazy -- ironically on PayPal's Secure Payments subdomain.
  • Important Notice Regarding Public Availability of Stable Patches
    Grsecurity has existed for over 14 years now. During this time it has been the premier solution for hardening Linux against security exploits and served as a role model for many mainstream commercial applications elsewhere. All modern OSes took our lead and implemented to varying degrees a number of security defenses we pioneered; some have even been burned into silicon in newer processors. Over the past decade, these defenses (a small portion of those we've created and have yet to release) have single-handedly caused the greatest increase in security for users worldwide.
  • Finland detains Russian accused of U.S. malware crimes
    Finland confirmed on Thursday it has detained a Russian citizen, Maxim Senakh, at the request of U.S. federal authorities on computer fraud charges, in a move that Russia calls illegal.
  • Finland confirms arrest of Russian citizen accused of crimes in the US
    Finnish authorities have confirmed the detention of Maxim Senakh, a Russian citizen accused of committing malware crimes in the US. The Russian Foreign Ministry has expressed concern and called on Finland to respect international law.
  • More than 80% of healthcare IT leaders say their systems have been compromised
    Eighty-one percent of healthcare executives say their organizations have been compromised by at least one malware, botnet or other kind of cyberattack during the past two years, according to a survey by KPMG. The KPMG report also states that only half of those executives feel that they are adequately prepared to prevent future attacks. The attacks place sensitive patient data at risk of exposure, KPMG said. The 2015 KPMG Healthcare Cybersecurity Survey polled 223 CIOs, CTOs, chief security officers and chief compliance officers at healthcare providers and health plans.
  • Removal of SSLv3 from LibreSSL
  • Kansas seeks to block release of voting machine paper tapes
    The top election official in Kansas has asked a Sedgwick County judge to block the release of voting machine tapes sought by a Wichita mathematician who is researching statistical anomalies favoring Republicans in counts coming from large precincts in the November 2014 general election.