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Hardware

Solar plant monitoring system taps Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Storm Energy has upgraded its “SunSniffer” solar plant monitoring system to a Linux-based platform running on a Raspberry Pi SBC.

Germany-based Storm Energy is the latest of a growing number of companies building commercial products based on the hackable Raspberry Pi single board computer. The company’s SunSniffer system is designed to monitor photovoltaic (PV) solar power installations of all sizes, and the latest version can also control the equipment, says the company. The new SunSniffer version adds a Raspberry Pi SBC along with a custom expansion board and customized Linux OS, which combine to enhance the system’s flexibility and upgradability.

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Mile High Milestone: Tegra K1 “Denver” Will Be First 64-bit ARM Processor for Android

Filed under
Android
Hardware

This means that future mobile devices using our 64-bit Tegra K1 chip can offer PC-class performance for standard apps, extended battery life and the best web browsing experience – all while opening new possibilities for gaming, content creation and enterprise apps.

Look forward later this year to some amazing mobile devices based on the 64-bit Tegra K1 from our partners. And for hard-core Android fans, take note that we’re already developing the next version of Android – “L” – on the 64-bit Tegra K1.

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NVIDIA Performance Counters In Nouveau Hoped For With Linux 3.19

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Samuel Pitoiset continues making steady, great progress on his Google Summer of Code project as a student developer reverse-engineering and implementing NVIDIA hardware performance counters within the open-source Nouveau driver.

For months now he's had a solid understanding of how NVIDIA's performance counters operate and has been working towards exposing them in a NVPerfKit-like open-source manner and exposing them to OpenGL developers. Samuel's latest update revealed his MP counter work was up to a prototype stage while today he has a new blog post concerning the approaches to exposing the performance counters in Nouveau.

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Lots Of New ARM Hardware To Be Supported By Linux 3.17

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Several new ARM devices will be supported by the in-development Linux 3.17 kernel while some less-than-optimally-supported ARM hardware is also getting stripped from the mainline kernel tree.

Olof Johansson emailed in the large batch of ARM changes today for the Linux 3.17 merge window. Some highlights for the pull request consisting of around 750 patches include.

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Raspberry Pi add-on board controls entire buildings

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

UniPi is seeking Indiegogo funding for a Raspberry Pi add-on for building automation with analog and digital I/O, changeover relays, and 1-Wire interfaces.

The Raspberry Pi has found its way into many a home automation project, from lighting controls to automatic sprinkler systems, and is often used as a prototype for commercial systems. But is the modest RPi up for managing an entire building? No problem, says Czech startup UniPi, which is offering Indiegogo funding packages of 99 Euros ($133) and 109 Euros ($146) for its UniPi building automation add-on board.

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The Wacom Input Driver Gets Enhanced With Linux 3.17

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Hardware

The input subsystem pull request has been submitted for the Linux 3.17 merge window.

Among the items in the input pull sent in by Dmitry Torokhov is a rework of the Wacom driver, which now has been converted to the kernel's HID infrastructure and the USB/Bluetooth support has been unified where as previously Wacom was just treated as a USB driver. This big Wacom driver update was done by Benjamin Tissoires. In the Wacom space, there's also now a driver for serial Wacom devices.

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RasPi magazine launches today – get your free downloads here

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Hardware

Our brand new sister magazine RasPi is here! Issue #1 is out today, available to download through Apple’s App Store. It’s jam-packed full of amazing content and only costs 69p/99¢.

Each month we’ll be walking you through a big Pi project, showing off some of the best work in the community, sharing your tweets, letters and emails, and of course giving you a whole bunch of tutorials to teach you how to get the most from your Raspberry Pi and make amazing things with it.

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Linux 3.17 Adds Support For Intel "Braswell" HD Audio

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Takashi Iwai of SUSE has sent in his set of sound/ALSA changes that are queued up for the Linux 3.17 kernel.

The sound subsystem updates for Linux 3.17 are mostly centered around a ton of ASoC updates, but there's also a few noteworthy changes to the commonly used HD Audio code. In particular, upcoming Intel Braswell hardware has its audio supported by the Linux 3.17 kernel. Going along with Braswell as HD Audio changes are fix-ups for several HD-Audio-using systems including the HP Envy TS, Dell XPS 15, and Gigabyte BXBT-2807, among other platforms.

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Fedora 21 and ARM aarch64 status for alpha

Filed under
Red Hat
Hardware

With the Fedora 21 Alpha freeze looming in the rear view mirror, although the object wasn’t as close as it would appear, I thought it was high time that I gave a brief overview of the state of ARM aarch64 in Fedora. Some might assume the silence means not a lot has been happening but this is extremely far from the truth!

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$149 networking security gizmo runs Snort on OpenWRT

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Itus Networks is set to launch a $149 “iGuardian” network security appliance on Kickstarter that runs OpenWRT Linux and the Snort IPS stack on a MIPS64 SoC.

Few vendors have targeted the consumer network security appliance market, and even fewer have done so with pricing under $500. A San Jose, Calif.-based startup called Itus Networks, however, plans to protect your home WiFi router with a $149, open source Linux iGuardian device that offers both a network intrusion prevention system (NIPS) and a network intrusion detection system (NIDS). The device blocks cyber attacks while also filtering out malware “and other undesirable content,” says the company. Like other network security appliances, it sits between your Internet source and your WiFi router, acting as a security firewall.

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A Fedora 22 beta walk-through

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Unix and Personal Computers: Reinterpreting the Origins of Linux

So, to sum up: What Linus Torvalds, along with plenty of other hackers in the 1980s and early 1990s, wanted was a Unix-like operating system that was free to use on the affordable personal computers they owned. Access to source code was not the issue, because that was already available—through platforms such as Minix or, if they really had cash to shell out, by obtaining a source license for AT&T Unix. Therefore, the notion that early Linux programmers were motivated primarily by the ideology that software source code should be open because that is a better way to write it, or because it is simply the right thing to do, is false. Read more Also: Anti-Systemd People

Kubuntu 15.04 With Plasma 5.3 - A Totally Different Kubuntu

The latest version of Kubuntu, 15.04, aka Vivid Vervet was released last week and it's available for free download. With this release it has become the first major distro to ship Plasma 5 as the default desktop environment. There are chances that some users may still have bad memories of Kubuntu. It's true. Back in 2011 when Ubuntu made a switch to Unity, I started looking for alternatives as their desktop environment was not suited for me. I started trying KDE-based distros and Kubuntu was among the top choices. However my experience with the distro was mixed. It was buggy, bloated and GTK apps would look ugly in it. That's when I found openSUSE and settled down with it. Read more More on KDE:

  • KActivities powered recent media in Plasma Media Center
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  • kreenshot-editor is incubating
    Now, kreenshot-editor is a new Qt-based project that was inspired by Greenshot’s image editor. It is hosted on KDE playground. It focuses on the image editing task, can be invoked from command line and should also provide a resuable editor component which could be integrated into other screencapture tools. The current code is already separated into an image editor widget and the main application.
  • Spring break for the KDE system monitor

64-bit STB SoC supports 4K video and Android TV

Marvell announced an “Ultra” version of its Android-focused Armada 1500 STB SoC that advances to a 64-bit, quad-core Cortex-A53 foundation for 4K delivery. The Armada 1500 Ultra (88DE3218) is designed to “enable PayTV operators and set-top box (STB) manufacturers to cost-effectively deliver small form factor devices with feature-rich 4K entertainment and gaming services,” says Armada. As with earlier Armada 1500 system-on-chips, it’s primarily focused on Android, with specific support for Android TV Read more