Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Hardware

Thread-optimized IoT gateway adds Ubuntu Core support

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

Rigado announced that its i.MX6 UL based Vesta IoT Gateway, which offer Ethernet, WiFi, BT, Thread, and optional LTE, LoRa, and PoE, will soon be available with Ubuntu Core and Canonical’s IoT app store.

Starting this summer, Portland, Oregon-based Rigado will offer its Edge Connectivity gateway solutions with Canonical’s IoT-focused, transactional Ubuntu Core distribution. Rigado is referring to its low-cost, Yocto Project powered Vesta IoT Gateway, which launched in Dec. 2016 without the Vesta name. The new Ubuntu Core support will enable “sophisticated control, monitoring and tracking applications,” as well as “connected guest experiences,” says Canonical in its version of the announcement.

Read more

Also:

  • BeagleWire, GitHub DDoS Attack, Open Source Bonus Winners and More

    Ubuntu 16.04.4 LTS (Xenial Xerus) was released yesterday. The update includes "security updates and corrections for other high-impact bugs, with a focus on maintaining stability and compatibility with Ubuntu 16.04 LTS". See the release announcement for more info and links to downloads.

Devices: Embedded Linux Controllers, BeagleWire, Open source Protocol Decoder Scripts

Filed under
Hardware

Open Hardware News

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Keyboardio Hits a High Point in Open Hardware

    My expectations for Keyboardio’s Model 01 were high. I pre-ordered the keyboard during its 2015 crowdfunding campaign, and waited for over two years with increasing frustration as one delay in manufacturing followed another. Then, in 2017, the first Model 01s shipped — but not mine. By the time mine arrived in February 2018, my expectations were so high that I was sure that the reality could not possibly match my expectations.

    I was dead right.

    Reality exceeded my expectations, and by more than I could possibly imagine. The Model 01 is not the first programmable keyboard. Nor is it the first open source keyboard, the first keyboard with mechanical switches, or the first ergonomic keyboard. However, so far as I’m aware, no other keyboard has combined all these features at once. Combining aesthetics, ergonomics, hardware customization, and software customization, Keyboardio’s Model 01 is a keyboard in a class of its own.

  • Trinamic Licenses Codasip’s Bk3 RISC-V Processor for Next Generation Motion Control Applications

    Brno, Czech Republic and Hamburg, Germany, 28th February 2018. - Codasip, the leading supplier of RISC-V® embedded processor IP, announced today that Trinamic, the global leader in embedded motor and motion control ICs and microsystems, has selected Codasip's Bk3 processor for its next-generation family of products.

  • GreenWaves Puts Another Spin on IoT Chips

    Rather than using the ubiquitous Arm Cortex-A or -M cores, GreenWaves relies on the potentially ubiquitous RISC-V design. The benefits here are twofold: RISC-V is free (as in free beer), and RISC-V permits user-defined extensions. GreenWaves took advantage of both characteristics to build itself a complex multicore MCU that’s tweaked for image, audio, and sensor processing. The idea is to make the edge-node processor smart enough that it doesn’t have to upload raw data to a smarter device upstream. Do your data-capture, analysis, filtering, and massaging right at the point of collection and you’ll save yourself time, money, and power.

    GAP8 has nine identical RISC-V cores: one for overall housekeeping and eight for massaging incoming data. The housekeeping side looks like a very traditional MCU, with a UART, SPI and I2C interfaces,

Can Open-source Hardware Be Like Open-source Software?

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

Hardware and software are certainly different beasts. Software is really just information, and the storing, modification, duplication, and transmission of information is essentially free. Hardware is expensive, or so we think, because it’s made out of physical stuff which is costly to ship or copy. So when we talk about open-source software (OSS) or open-source hardware (OSHW), we’re talking about different things — OSS is itself the end product, while OSHW is just the information to fabricate the end product, or have it fabricated.

The fabrication step makes OSHW essentially different from OSS, at least for now, but I think there’s something even more fundamentally different between the current state of OSHW and OSS: the pull request and the community. The success or failure of an OSS project depends on the community of people developing it, and for smaller projects that can hinge on the ease of a motivated individual digging in and contributing. This is the main virtue of OSS in my opinion: open-source software is most interesting when people are reading and writing that source.

Read more

Also: GreenWaves Intros Open-Source AI Processor GAP8

Crankshaft: Open Source Car Computer

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

Modern cars and head units are pretty fancy gadget-wise. But what if your car still has an 8-track? No problem. Just pick up a Raspberry Pi 3 and a seven-inch touchscreen, and use Crankshaft to turn it into an Android Auto setup.

The open source project is based on OpenAuto which, in turn, leverages aasdk. The advantage to Crankshaft is it is a plug-and-play distribution. However, if you prefer, you can build it all yourself from GitHub.

Read more

Also: Oreo-driven dev board showcases octa-core Snapdragon 845

5 keys to building open hardware

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

The science community is increasingly embracing free and open source hardware (FOSH). Researchers have been busy hacking their own equipment and creating hundreds of devices based on the distributed digital manufacturing model to advance their scientific experiments.

A major reason for all this interest in distributed digital manufacturing of scientific FOSH is money: Research indicates that FOSH slashes costs by 90% to 99% compared to proprietary tools. Commercializing scientific FOSH with open hardware business models has supported the rapid growth of an engineering subfield to develop FOSH for science, which comes together annually at the Gathering for Open Science Hardware.

Read more

RISC-V is Growing

Filed under
Hardware

Devices: Microchip and TinyFPGAs

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Microchip Introduces Tiny Cheap Linux Modules

    Linux is in everything these days, and that means designers and engineers are crying out for a simple, easy-to-use module that simplifies the design of building a product to do something with Linux. The best example of this product category would probably be the Raspberry Pi Compute Module, followed by the C.H.I.P. Pro and its GR8 module. There are dozens of boards with Allwinner and Mali chips stuffed inside that can be used to build a Linux product, and the ‘BeagleBone on a Chip’ is a fantastic product if you need Linux and want to poke pins really, really fast.

  • The Next Generation of TinyFPGAs

    Field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) have come of age. Once viewed as exotic and scary there are a number of FPGA boards targeting the maker market and among them is a new range of open source TinyFPGA boards.

    The latest TinyFPGA board is the TinyFPGA BX board, an updated version of their B2 board, and it’s arriving soon on Crowd Supply.

Open source RISC-V architecture is changing the game for IoT processors

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Over the past decade, open source software has been one of the biggest catalysts in the tech world. Today, the power of open source, the freedom it enables, and the communities that it generates are gaining traction in the hardware world too. For these reasons, RISC-V is gaining huge popularity. Here is an introduction to RISC-V and the opportunities it opens.

Read more

Also:

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Steam Controller Kernel Driver Is Landing In The Linux 4.18 Kernel

The Linux 4.18 kernel will feature the initial Steam Controller kernel driver that works without having to use the Steam client or using third-party user-space applications like the SC-Controller application. A few months back we reported on a kernel driver being worked on for the Steam Controller by an independent user/developer outside of the gates of Valve. In part through reverse-engineering, Rodrigo Rivas Costa has been working on this native Steam Controller Linux kernel driver that works for both USB cable and wireless modes of the Steam Controller and is a proper HID driver. Read more

Video of AsteroidOS

KDevelop 5.2.2 and 5.2.3 released

KDevelop 5.2.2 and 5.2.3 released We today provide a stabilization and bugfix release with version 5.2.2 and 5.2.3. 5.2.2 was tagged 6 weeks ago, but we never managed to release it because we did not have the patience to fix the Windows installers in time due to a broken CI. Windows installers are provided for 5.2.3 again. We'll only provide source tarballs for 5.2.2 and we encourage everyone to just skip this release and use 5.2.3 which contains a few more bug fixes. This is a bugfix-only release, which introduces no new features and as such is a safe and recommended update for everyone currently using KDevelop 5.2.1. Read more Also: This week in Usability & Productivity, part 19

FreeOffice 2018 Release is Seamlessly Compatible With MS Office on Linux

FreeOffice 2018 has just been released and it provides even better support for Microsoft Office documents on Linux. Read more