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HP Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server
Google
Hardware
  • HP launches OpenSwitch community, new open source NOS

    HP has launched the OpenSwitch community and a new open source network operating system (NOS).

    HP and key supporters, Accton Technology Corporation, Arista, Broadcom, Intel, and VMWare, are delivering a community-based platform that provides developers and users the ability to accelerate innovation, avoid vendor lock-in and realize investment protection as they rapidly build data center networks customized for unique business applications.

  • HP announces refreshed Chromebook 14 w/ full HD display, new Sky Blue color option

    HP today has taken the wraps off a refreshed lineup of Chromebooks. In a press release, the company revealed a new Chromebook 14 lineup with hardware and cosmetic improvements. In addition to a 14-inch model with a 1366×768 display, HP is also offering a model with a full 1080p HD display.

    Both models, however, feature an Intel Celeron N2840 processor coupled with 2GB of RAM and 16GB of internal flash storage. The previous generation model used an Nvidia processor. Battery life is also improved this year, with HP quoting 9 hours of runtime. Though, the higher-resolution HD model will likely clock in a slightly below that.

  • HP announces new Chromebook 14 with Intel processor

    In today's open source roundup: HP's new Chromebook 14 will use an Intel processor. Plus: DistroWatch reviews Linux Lite 2.6. And a review of the Nexus 6P phone

Raspberry Pi KMS Driver Pull Request Sent For Linux 4.4

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

This Broadcom VC4 DRM/KMS driver has been in the works for a while now with the main hardware target being the Raspberry Pi / Raspberry Pi 2. The Broadcom architectures officially supported by this driver are the bcm2835 and bcm2836. While Eric has also been working on a VC4 Gallium3D driver, this VC4 KMS driver being offered up for Linux 4.4 lacks the kernel bits for hardware acceleration as well as power management. There's other out-of-tree code for that, but it's not ready for mainline with Linux 4.4. Thus with Linux 4.4 on the Pi, you'll just get a nice kernel mode-set powered display with a display plane and cursor.

Read more

Displaylink adds Linux support for USB monitors

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware

A few weeks ago at IDF, Displaylink released drivers for USB monitors on Linux. This has been something SemiAccurate has been asking them about since, well it has been years now.

The idea is simple, transfer video data over USB rather than a dedicated video port. This requires a bit of compression, CPU load, and of course their proprietary hardware on the monitor side. That isn’t a big deal, the chips are fairly inexpensive and since you are buying a USB monitor or dock, it comes with the device out of the box. On the plus side it means your monitor will work everywhere, or at least it will now.

Read more

Also: Intel Compute Shaders Appear Nearly Ready For Mainline Mesa

EPIC SBC, Chip PC, and Kobo firmware

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Raspberry Pi Screen

Filed under
Development
Linux
Hardware

The Eagerly Awaited Raspberry Pi Display

Filed under
Development
Linux
Hardware

In the end we chose an industrial-quality display from our friends at Inelco Hunter based in the UK, who were able to create something very special:

RGB 800×480 display @60fps

24-bit colour

FT5406 10 point capacitive touchscreen

70 degree viewing angle

Metal-backed display with mounting holes for the Pi

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OSVR in the News

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Open source VR from Razer readies for commercial launch, gains more dev support

    Back in January Razer lifted the lid on its highly customizable "Hacker Dev Kit" VR headset and OSVR (Open-Source Virtual Reality) platform, both designed "to set an open standard for virtual reality input devices."

    Now the company has revealed that the consumer version of its headset, the HDK v1.3, will be available for pre-order on October 1, and that its OSVR content discovery platform has launched and can be accessed right away.

  • OSVR's open-source VR headset is slowly taking shape

    The Open Source Virtual Reality (OSVR) headset will get a significant upgrade soon. Gaming peripheral company Razer announced the OSVR program back in January, but the first prototype headset was an underwhelming affair with uncomfortable ergonomics and a so-so display. That wasn't really the point, though. Rather than a single company aiming to dominate the VR market, OSVR is a loose band of hardware and software companies hoping to do for virtual reality "what Android did for mobile."

  • OSVR releasing upgraded VR headset development kit in October
  • The Open Source Virtual Reality movement takes a big jump forward

    As the Virtual Reality gaming market grows, there are some growing efforts that are seeking to be less proprietary, and more inclusive about the process. Open Source Virtual Reality, or OSVR, is a movement that involves not just Razer, but over 230 companies that support the cause.

Open Source GPU now out

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware

Hoping that MIAOW is not a catastrophe

An open saucy general-purpose graphics processor (GPGPU) has been unveiled at the Hot Chips event.

The GPGPU is relatively crude and is part of another piece of an emerging open-source hardware platform called MIAOW.

Read more

Also: Nvidia Linux Video Driver 355.11 Adds Experimental OpenGL Support to EGL

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu Studio 16.10 to Offer an Up-to-Date Multimedia Oriented Linux Distro

We reported earlier today, September 28, 2016, on the availability of the Final Beta (Beta 2) development milestone of the upcoming Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) operating system and its official derivatives. We've already talked here about what's new in the Beta 2 of Ubuntu MATE 16.10, Lubuntu 16.10, and Kubuntu 16.10, and now we would like to tell you a little bit about Ubuntu Studio 16.10, which promises to offer users an up-to-date multimedia oriented Linux-based operating system. That's right, it looks like today's Ubuntu Studio 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) Beta 2 snapshot comes with all the latest software releases and a bunch of new apps that you might need for audio, video, or graphics processing jobs. But first, we need to tell you that Ubuntu Studio 16.10 is powered by a low-latency Linux 4.8 kernel. Read more Also: Ubuntu GNOME 16.10 Beta 2 Released with Many Apps from the GNOME 3.22 Stack

Raspberry Pi Announces PIXEL Desktop Environment

Today the Raspberry Pi Foundation formally announced the Raspberry Pi PIXEL, their own desktop that will be used in future Raspbian spins. PIXEL is short for Pi Improved Xwindows Environment, Lightweight desktop. PIXEL is derived from the LXDE desktop environment but with both appearance and fundamental changes, including some new applications. Read more

today's leftovers

  • 'Do you really need to do that?'
    A new postdoc student arrived at our department this semester, and after learning that he uses GNU/Linux for all his computing, I invited him along to TFUG. During some of our meetings people asked “how could I do X on my GNU/Linux desktop?” and, jokingly, the postdoc would respond “the answer to your question is ‘do you really need to do that?’” Sometimes the more experienced GNU/Linux users at the table would respond to questions by suggesting that the user should simply give up on doing X, and the postdoc would slap his thigh and laugh and say “see? I told you that’s the answer!” The phenomenon here is that people who have at some point made a commitment to at least try to use GNU/Linux for all their computing quickly find that they have come to value using GNU/Linux more than they value engaging in certain activities that only work well/at all under a proprietary operating system. I think that this is because they get used to being treated with respect by their computer. And indeed, one of the reasons I’ve almost entirely given up on computer gaming is that computer games are non-free software. “Are you sure you need to do that?” starts sounding like a genuine question rather than simply a polite way of saying that what someone wants to do can’t be achieved.
  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 25
    Another development sprint is over. Time flies! In our previous post we already reported about the branching of Tumbleweed and the upcoming releases and about the expected consequences: the landing of some cool features in a less conservative Tumbleweed.
  • Mintbox Mini Pro is a little Linux PC with big specs for $395
  • PepeLine is a 3D puzzle game that will get you addicted instantly
  • GNU Tools Cauldron 2016, ARMv8 multi-arch edition
    That is what my England trip for the GNU Tools Cauldron was, but that only seemed to add to the pleasure of meeting friends again. I flewin to Heathrow and started on an almost long train journey to Halifax,with two train changes from Reading. I forgot my phone on the trainbut the friendly station manager at Halifax helped track it down andgot it back to me. That was the first of the many times I forgotstuff in a variety of places during this trip. Like I discovered thatI forgot to carry a jacket or an umbrella. Or shorts. Or full lengthpants for that matter. Like I purchased an umbrella from Sainsbury’s but forgot to carry it out. I guess you got the drift of it.

today's howtos