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Hardware

Pico-ITX board runs Linux or Android on RK3399

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Android
Linux
Hardware

IEI unveiled a “Hyper-RK39” Pico-ITX SBC that runs Ubuntu or Android on a Rockchip RK3399 and supplies 2GB RAM, 16B eMMC, dual and 4K display support, GbE, WiFi/BT, and optional LTE.

The hexa-core Rockchip RK3399 continues to be popular on community hacker boards such as the recent NanoPi Neo4. Now, commercial board vendors are giving the somewhat x86-like Arm SoC a try. First, there was Aaeon’s RICO-3399 and now IEI has answered with the similarly Pico-ITX form factor (100 x 72mm) Hyper-RK39.

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Linux Devices: Odroid and More

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Linux
Hardware
  • New Raspberry Pi-like Odroid-H2 board packs Intel Gemini Lake quad-core CPU

    Though less well known than Raspberry Pi, Odroid boards have been available for just as long, offering an alternative for developers looking for something more powerful, such as the Odroid-U2 and the cancelled Odroid-N1.

    Many of its boards have employed Samsung's Exynos Arm-based chips, but the newly announced Odroid-H2 runs on an x86 architecture Intel Gemini Lake processor.

  • Compact Apollo Lake net appliance offers SATA and LAN bypass

    Aaeon’s FWS-2276 network appliance is equipped with a Celeron N3350 SoC, 4x GbE ports with one-pair bypass, a 2.5-inch SATA bay, 2x USB 3.0 ports, and shock and vibration resistance.

    Aaeon announced an entry level, 165 x 92 x 40mm FWS-2276 network appliance that is closely based on its earlier FWS-2272. The main differences include the FWS-2276 dropping the earlier wireless support in favor of adding a 2.5-inch SATA bay and a single-pair LAN bypass function “to safeguard the flow of network traffic in the event of software complications or loss of power.” The company notes, however, that “since the system boards and chassis are cross-compatible, buyers can custom-order appliances with the features they need to suit their requirements.”

  • Arm adds Linux-on-Cortex-A5 service to MCU-focused DesignStart program

    Arm has extended its Cortex-M oriented DesignStart program to Cortex-A5 SoCs running Linux. The SoC development platform starts at $75,000 for Cortex-A5 IP access and a year of design support.

    Arm’s DesignStart, which helps semiconductor manufacturers develop Cortex-M based MCUs, has for the first time been extended to support a Linux-ready Cortex-A processor. DesignStart for Cortex-A5 now offers developers “the lowest cost access to a Linux-capable Arm CPU,” says the chip IP designer.

Open Source 3D Printing and Open Source MIDI Foot Controller

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Hardware
OSS
  • Open Source 3D Printing: Exploring Scientific and Medical Solutions

    3D Printing is not a new thing to hear about. It is a very popular industry right now that began in the early 80s. But how different is Open Source 3D Printing from proprietary designs? How does this affect its applications in Science and Medicine? Let’s read on.

  • Finally, An Open Source MIDI Foot Controller

    MIDI has been around for longer than most of the readers of Hackaday, and you can get off my lawn. In spite of this, MIDI is still commonly used in nearly every single aspect of musical performance, and there are a host of tools and applications to give MIDI control to a live performance. That said, if you want a MIDI foot controller, your best bet is probably something used from the late 90s, although Behringer makes an acceptable foot controller that doesn’t have a whole bunch of features. There is obviously a need for a feature packed, Open Source MIDI foot controller. That’s where the Pedalino comes in. It’s a winner of the Musical Instrument Challenge in this year’s Hackaday Prize, and if you want a MIDI foot controller, this is the first place you should look.

Can You Build An Open Source Pocket Operator?

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Hardware
OSS

Toys are now musical instruments. Or we’ll just say musical instruments are now toys. You can probably ascribe this recent phenomenon to Frooty Loops or whatever software the kids are using these days, but the truth is that it’s never been easier to lay down a beat. Just press the buttons on a pocket-sized computer.

One of the best examples of the playification of musical instruments is Pocket Operators from Teenage Engineering. They’re remarkable pieces of hardware, and really just a custom segment LCD and a few buttons. They also sound great and you can play real music with them. It’s a game changer when it comes to enabling musicianship.

Of course, with any popular platform, there’s a need for an Open Source copy. That’s where [Chris]’ Teensy Beats Shield comes in. It’s a ‘shield’ of sorts for a Teensy microcontroller that adds buttons, knobs, and a display, turning this into a platform that uses the Teensy’s incredible audio system designer.

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ODROID 'Hacker Board'

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Hardware
  • ODROID Rolling Out New Intel-Powered Single Board Computer After Trying With Ryzen

    While ODROID is most known for their various ARM single board computers (SBCs), some of which offer impressive specs, they have dabbled in x86 SBCs and on Friday announced the Intel-powered ODROID-H2.

    In the announcement they mentioned as well they were exploring an AMD Ryzen 5 2500U powered SBC computer, which offered fast performance but the price ended up being prohibitive. After the falling out with Ryzen over those cost concerns, they decided to go ahead with an Intel Geminilake SoC. Geminilake is slower than their proposed Ryzen board, but the price was reasonable and it ends up still being much faster than ODROID's earlier Apollolake SBC.

  • Odroid-H2 is world’s first Gemini Lake hacker board

    Hardkernel unveiled the Odroid-H2, the first hacker board with an Intel Gemini Lake SoC. The Ubuntu 18.10 driven SBC ships with 2x SATA 3.0, 2x GbE, HDMI and DP, 4x USB, and an M.2 slot for NVMe.

    When the Odroid-H2 goes on sale in November at a price that will be “higher than $100,” Hardkernel will join a small group of vendors that have launched a community backed x86-based SBC. This first open spec hacker board built around Intel’s new Gemini Lake SoC — and one of the first Gemini Lake SBCs of any kind — follows earlier Arm-based Odroid winners such as the Odroid-C2 Raspberry Pi pseudo clone and the octa-core Odroid-XU4.

Jetson TX2, Gemini Lake, and Kaby Lake based mini-PCs run Linux

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Hardware

Cirrus7 unveiled an “AI-Box TX2” mini-PC with a Jetson TX2 module and -20 to 70°C support. The company also offers four, similarly Linux-friendly Kaby Lake-based mini-PCs and a new Gemini Lake model.

Cirrus7 is a German manufacturer of Intel Core based mini-PCs that are available barebone or with pre-installed Ubuntu, Linux Mint, or Windows. Now the company has stepped into the Arm world with a mini-PC based on Nvidia’s Jetson TX2 module.

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Kickstarting the Makerphone: an open-source hardware phone kit, programmable with python and Scratch

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Hardware
OSS

Circuitmess's fully funded Makerphone kickstarter is raising money to produce open source hardware smartphone kits to teach kids (and grownups) everything from soldering to programming.

The Makerphone is a pretty sweet-looking gadget, and it comes ready to be programmed with Scratch and python, providing a good progression from a fully graphic programming environment to a command-line language that's still beginner-friendly.

$94 gets you a kit and the tools to assemble it; $99 gets you an assembled phone. The project's runners have previously delivered on kickstarted open source hardware kits, which bodes well for getting something for your money.

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Hacker friendly LapPi laptop kit runs on Raspberry Pi 3B+

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

SB Components is Kickstartering a Raspberry Pi based “LapPi” laptop kit with 7- or 5-inch screens, keyboard, camera, speakers, and 3800mAh battery, starting at $220 with an RPi 3B+ or $178 without.

SB Components has successfully funded its DIY LapPi kit on Kickstarter, and packages are available through Nov. 10 with December delivery. The company is known for its PiTalk smartphone and other Raspberry Pi add-on kits, which are available as options.

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Linux Devices: ARM/Linux in Servers and Embedded, Chromecast

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Linux
Hardware

Linux-driven embedded PCs target autonomous cars

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Linux
Hardware

Kontron announced two Ubuntu-driven computers for autonomous vehicles. The S2000 is a lab dev platform with a Xeon 8160T and the EvoTRAC S1901 offers a choice of Kontron modules including a new Atom C3000 based, Type 7 COMe-bDV7R.

Kontron has launched a Kontron’s S2000 Development Platform for developing autonomous in-vehicle computers and is prepping an EvoTRAC S1901 in-vehicle PC for use in advanced automotive applications, including autonomous vehicles. Both systems ship with Intel processors running a pre-installed Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Linux stack. The systems follow earlier Kontron automotive computers such as the EvoTrac G102 in-vehicle cellular gateway.

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Debian Installer Buster Alpha 4 release

The Debian Installer team[1] is pleased to announce the fourth alpha release of the installer for Debian 10 "Buster". Foreword ======== I'd like to start by thanking Christian Perrier, who spent many years working on Debian Installer, especially on internationalization (i18n) and localization (l10n) topics. One might remember graphs and blog posts on Planet Debian with statistics; keeping track of those numbers could look like a pure mathematical topic, but having uptodate translations is a key part of having a Debian Installer that is accessible for most users. Thank you so much, Christian! Read more Also: Debian Installer Buster Alpha 4 Released