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Hardware

Raspberry Pi 3 Debut

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Linux
Hardware
  • Raspberry Pi 3 on sale now at $35

    Exactly four years ago, on 29 February 2012, we unleashed the original 256MB Raspberry Pi Model B on a largely unsuspecting world. Since then, we’ve shipped over eight million units, including three million units of Raspberry Pi 2, making us the UK’s all-time best-selling computer. The Raspberry Pi Foundation has grown from a handful of volunteers to have over sixty full-time employees, including our new friends from Code Club. We’ve sent a Raspberry Pi to the International Space Station and are training teachers around the world through our Picademy program.

  • Raspberry Pi 3 has Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, 64-bit chip, still just $35

    The third major version of the Raspberry Pi will go on sale Monday, with the $35/£30 credit card-sized Raspberry Pi 3 Model B now sporting a 64-bit processor and embedded Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

    In previous versions, the Pi needed USB adapters to get Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity. Raspberry Pi 3 supports 802.11n Wi-Fi (2.4GHz only) and Bluetooth 4.0 without an adapter, freeing up its four USB ports for other purposes.

  • Raspberry Pi 3 with 64-bit quad-core SoC, built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth announced for $35

    Months after introducing its most affordable Raspberry Pi Zero, the company has introduced the Raspberry Pi 3, successor of the Raspberry Pi 2 that was introduced back in February last year. Even though it is in the same size and has much of the same components on board as the Pi 2, the new Pi 3 has a faster 64-bit quad-core Broadcom BCM2837 SoC with ARM Cortex-A53 CPU, has built-in Wi-Fi 802.11n and Bluetooth 4.1.Months after introducing its most affordable Raspberry Pi Zero, the company has introduced the Raspberry Pi 3, successor of the Raspberry Pi 2 that was introduced back in February last year. Even though it is in the same size and has much of the same components on board as the Pi 2, the new Pi 3 has a faster 64-bit quad-core Broadcom BCM2837 SoC with ARM Cortex-A53 CPU, has built-in Wi-Fi 802.11n and Bluetooth 4.1.

AMD/Intel on Vulkan

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware

Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware

Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware

C.H.I.P. and Raspberry Pi 2

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Linux
Hardware
  • C.H.I.P. – Not A Replacement For Beast, But A Useful Controller Board

    I’ve been looking for an ARMed replacement for Beast’s power-sucking/fanfull/large corpse. This isn’t it. It is a very well documented controller that ships with a minimal installation of Debian GNU/Linux complete with GUI. I could, for instance, use this thing to make a pulsewidth modulator for a power supply. It’s obviously overkill for such a task but at the advertised price, $9, it’s OK.

  • Make a $40 Linux or Android PC with new Raspberry Pi 2 rival

    If you want to build a powerful $40 Linux or Android PC with 4K video support, consider Hardkernel's Odroid-C2 computer.

    The developer board is an uncased computer like the popular Raspberry Pi 2, which sells for $35. But South Korea-based Hardkernel claims Odroid-C2 has more horsepower than its popular rival and can be a desktop replacement.

Arduino, Open Source Hardware

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Hardware
OSS
  • 17-Year-Old Kid Tells How To Make A Real BB-8 Droid Powered By Arduino
  • Telecoms Look Past Cisco and HP to Open Source Hardware

    Now, a new wave of companies aims to push this movement even further. This morning, four big-name telecoms— AT&T, Verizon, Germany’s Deutsche Telekom, and South Korea’s SK Telecom—agreed to join the Open Compute Project. Through a sub-project dedicated to the needs of telecoms, they too will explore open source servers and networking equipment that can boost efficiency and reduce costs. “Everyone is looking for that same synergy and agility,” Gagan Puranik, a director of architecture planning at Verizon, says of his company and others who have joined Facebook’s experiment in open source hardware. “The learning and the sharing will go both ways.”

  • Large Telcos Flock to Facebook's Open Compute Project, Open Hardware [Ed: not code]

    According to Facebook's published guidelines, the new OCP Telco Project will advance the following objectives: 1) communicating telco technical requirements effectively to the OCP community; 2) strengthening the OCP ecosystem to address the deployment and operational needs of telcos; and 3) bringing OCP innovations to telco data center infrastructure for increased cost-savings and agility.

A Massive ARM v6/v7 Rework Is Landing With Linux 4.5 Plus Raspberry Pi 2 Support

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Hardware

Olof Johansson sent in all of the ARM SoC updates for the Linux 4.5 merge window on Friday night. Most significant is the ARM multi-platform code update. Olof explained, "This branch is the culmination of 5 years of effort to bring the ARMv6 and ARMv7 platforms together such that they can all be enabled and boot the same kernel. It has been a tremendous amount of cleanup and refactoring by a huge number of people, and creation of several new (and major) subsystems to better abstract out all the platform details in an appropriate manner. The bulk of this branch is a large patchset from Arnd that brings several of the more minor and older platforms we have closer to multiplatform support. Among these are MMP, S3C64xx, Orion5x, mv78xx0 and realview Much of this is moving around header files from old mach directories, but there are also some cleanup patches of debug_ll (lowlevel debug per-platform options) and other parts."

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Open Hardware

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Hardware
OSS

Devices Getting Smaller (With Linux)

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Hardware
  • Raspberry Picademy USA Accepting Applications

    Are you an enthusiastic individual that is interested in using the Raspberry Pi in the classroom and in community education programs? Then get ready to fill out your application for Raspberry Picademy USA! This will be the first time ever that the Raspberry Pi Foundation will be offering a Picademy in the United States. If you haven’t ever heard of Picademy, or have and are looking to participate, then I’ll answer some basic questions for you on the ins and outs of Raspberry Picademy USA.

  • Wintel Is Sick

    There isn’t any end in sight. As ARM and particularly ARM on mobile devices grows Wintel is being squeezed out of personal IT. Long ago, I and many others cut out That Other OS. Now many millions, billions even, are cutting out Intel. Both heads of the Wintel monopoly are diversifying as fast as they can and cutting prices or moving “profit centers” to avoid being trapped under the weight of their own handiwork. The world just doesn’t need either any longer but it does take a few years to switch over so much installed base of IT. It’s a process, not an event, just like sickness. It remains to be seen whether this is a mortal wounding or just an injury both can survive. I expect that both will survive but both will be cut down to size and only get a normal share of the pie instead of the whole thing.

  • Opportunities And Challenges That The Internet Of Things Creates

    Internet of Things is targeting not only devices, but also sensors. It’s incredible how they can be attached everywhere and record necessary data. For example, wearables are collecting data about fitness habits of their owners and this helps to update the devices with more attention paid to the functionality in high demand. Or, for example, network-connected sensors are used to inform farmers about the pregnancy and sickness of animals. Just imagine if your coffee cup could know how hot you want your coffee to be and how much sugar or milk you add. Collected data would allow businesses to get more specific information on how their products are used, how they break down and what is expected from them in the future.

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Linux Graphics

  • Libinput X.Org Driver Updated For X.Org Server 1.19
    Peter Hutterer has announced the release of a new version of xf86-input-libinput, the X.Org DDX driver that makes use of libinput for input handling on the X.Org Server.
  • xf86-input-libinput 0.20.0
    Most important fix is the use of input_lock() instead of the old SIGIO stuff to handle the input thread in server 1.19.
  • Mesa 13.0 Planning For Release At End Of October, Might Include RADV Vulkan
    Following the mailing list talk over the past two days about doing the next Mesa release, plans are being discussed for releasing at the end of October and it might have just got a whole lot more exciting. Emil Velikov, Collabora developer and Mesa release manager for the past several release series, has commented on that previously discussed mailing list thread. He mentioned he was secretly waiting in hopes of seeing the RADV Radeon Vulkan driver merged for this next release! He said he'd even be willing to see it merged even if it's "not perfect/feature complete."

Security News

  • Don't Trust Consumer Routers
    Another example of why you shouldn’t trust consumer routers. d-link It isn’t just this specific d-link router. We’ve seen the same issues over and over and over with pretty much every non-enterprise vendor. Plus we don’t want our devices used by crackers to DDoS Brian Krebs anymore, right? We are Linux people. We CAN do this ourselves.
  • D-Link DWR-932 router is chock-full of security holes
    Security researcher Pierre Kim has unearthed a bucketload of vulnerabilities affecting the LTE router/portable wireless hotspot D-Link DWR-932. Among these are backdoor accounts, weak default PINs, and hardcoded passwords.
  • The Cost of Cyberattacks Is Less than You Might Think
    What's being left out of these costs are the externalities. Yes, the costs to a company of a cyberattack are low to them, but there are often substantial additional costs borne by other people. The way to look at this is not to conclude that cybersecurity isn't really a problem, but instead that there is a significant market failure that governments need to address.
  • NHS trusts are still using unsupported Windows XP PCs
    AT LEAST 42 National Health Service (NHS) trusts in the UK still run Microsoft's now-defunct Windows XP operating system. Motherboard filed Freedom of Information requests with more than 70 NHS hospital trusts asking how many Windows XP machines they use. 48 replied within the allotted time, and a whopping 42 of them admitted that they still use the operating system that reached end-of-life status in April 2014. Some of the culprits include East Sussex Healthcare, which has 413 Windows XP machines, Sheffield's Children's hospital with 1,290, and Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Trust in London with an insane 10,800 Windows XP-powered PCs. 23 replied to Motherboard's quizzing about whether they have an extended support agreement in place and, unsurprisingly, the majority said that they do not.

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