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Linux: Jim Zemlin's Hypocrisy, Open Source Summit 2017 Roundup, AMD Graphics and CPU Failures/Bugs

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware

Devices: Congatec, Aaeon, Anavi

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Linux
Hardware
  • Linux-ready module features Atom C3000 and 4x 10GbE ports

    Congatec’s “Conga-B7AC” is a Linux-friendly Type 7 COM with up to a 16-core Atom C3000, and support for 4x 10GbE, 32x PCIe, and industrial temperatures.

    Congatec delivered one of the first COM Express 3.0 Type 7 modules with its Conga-B7XD, based on Intel 5th Gen “Broadwell” Xeon D and Pentium processors. Now it has introduced the Conga-B7AC Type 7 module with the same 125 x 95mm dimensions, 10GbE support, Linux support, and an up to 16-core Intel Server-class SoC, but with a more power efficient Atom C3000 “Denverton” SoC. There’s also a Conga-X7/EVAL carrier board (see farther below)

  • COM Express modules build on Kaby Lake and Xeon E3

    Aaeon announced a “NanoCOM-KBU” COM Express Type 10 Mini module with Intel 7th Gen U-Series chips and a “COM-KBHB6” Type 6 Basic module with a Xeon E3.

  • pHAT adds IR to the Raspberry Pi

    Anavi has gone to Crowd Supply to launch a new run of its $16 “Anavi Infrared pHAT,” which adds IR remote control to the Pi, and offers optional sensors.

Devices: Canonical’s 'IoT' Ambitions, SensiEdge’s SensiBLE

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Linux
Hardware
  • Meeting IoT challenges

    Founded 15 years ago, Canonical has been responsible for delivering the open source Ubuntu platform. “We work to ensure that Ubuntu is certified and can be used on PCs, servers and across cloud infrastructure,” Bell explains.

    “The rise of the IoT brings with it data and opportunities to monetise that data and one thing we can be sure about is that unpredicted methods of monetisation are sure to emerge.”

    Canonical’s approach to the IoT encourages the adoption of a single operating system and, crucially, one that can be upgradable over the air.

  • Tiny Bluetooth LE dev boards target IoT apps

    Two Cortex-M4 Bluetooth LE boards have gained wider distribution: Arrow is selling SensiEdge’s SensiBLE, and Mouser has Adafruit’s Feather Nrf52 Bluefruit.

    Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) continues to rise in importance as the wireless conduit for MCU-based IoT edge devices. Late last week Arrow Electronics announced it was launching the recently introduced SensiBLE IoT SoM, which is also referred to as the Simba-Pro, from Israel-based SensiEdge. (Mouser has already begun distributing the product, as has RS Components in the UK.)

Mobile Devices: Purism 5 Linux Phone, New in Tizen

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Linux
Hardware

Vorke V2 Plus Mini PC – Ubuntu PC with Impressive Features

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Hardware
Ubuntu

The Vorke V2 Mini PC is the latest to hit the market to compete with other mini PCs in the mini arena.

If you are looking for a mini PC that can get the job done, then take a look at the Vorke V2 Plus PC. This mini PC packs a lot of premium components into an ultra-portable housing that can fix right in the palm of your hand.
The Vorke V2 Plus has support for stunning 4K resolution thanks to the onboard Intel HD 620 graphics which deliver 1.5x better pixel production over the previous model. You can even tuck Vorke securely behind any monitor or TV that supports a VESA bracket.

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Also: Ubuntu devs look at making apt index files smaller

Laptops That Ship Pre-installed With Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

​In the past, to get Linux on your laptop, you needed to get a laptop that shipped with Windows and then install your Linux distro on top of them. This usually means two main issues. The first being that you paid about $100 extra for Windows and then also, support in terms of drivers for the laptop were up in the air as your hardware may be supported fully, partially or not at all. But these days things are changing. There are many laptops that ship with Linux preinstalled. Meaning you get better hardware support and then save some bucks off for not paying for Windows. THANK YOU! So what are your options if you wanted a laptop with Linux preinstalled? Read along.

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Devices: Raspberry Pi. AutoPi, Purism's Librem 5, Tizen-Based Z4 and Artik

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Linux
Hardware

Threadripper, Ryzen, and AMD

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Linux
Hardware
  • LLVMpipe & OpenSWR OpenGL Riding Off Threadripper

    One of the unique test requests coming in as part of our Threadripper on Linux testing is to see how well the LLVMpipe and OpenSWR CPU-based OpenGL implementations within Mesa perform for this 16 core / 32 thread single-socket processor. Here are those results.

    A few days back I did a similar LLVMpipe/SWR comparison on a 80 thread Intel system so check out those numbers if you are unfamiliar with these CPU-based OpenGL drivers... This testing is done mostly for curiosity about the viability of LLVMpipe/SWR on CPUs with high core counts.

  • New Ryzen runs well under Linux

    After AMD confirmed the "performance marginality problem" for Ryzen Linux users, RMAs have been being issued and replacement Ryzen processors arriving for those affected. Now Phoronix has been able to confirm that the new Ryzen CPUs are now stable.

    For those who came in late, some Linux users reported a segmentation fault problem that would occur under very heavy workloads. Now the replacements have been shipped, Phoronix has been able to test the Ryzen Threadripper 1950X under the same heavy loads which caused it to go tits up.

Open Hardware: TinyCircuits, Numworks, and Open Source FPGAs

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Hardware
  • TinyCircuits Portfolio of Tiny Open Source Electronics Available Globally from Digi-Key

    TinyCircuits' selection of small-size open source electronics, including the TinyDuino, is available for immediate shipment worldwide through Digi-Key Electronics, a global electronic components distributor, thanks to a new distribution agreement between the two companies.

  • Numworks graphing calculator is made for students raised on tech

    Now, an open-source calculator called Numworks is taking them on with a clean, simple look, an intuitive interface and open source programming and design.

  • Retrocomputing With Open Source FPGAs

    A few years ago, we saw the reverse engineering of the Lattice iCE40 bitstream, opening the door to a completely Open Source development tool chain for FPGAs. This was an astonishing amount of work from [Clifford Wolf], [Mathias Lasser], and [Cotton Seed], but since then we haven’t seen a whole lot from Project IceStorm. Now, that’s about to change, and in the coolest way possible. [hoglet] is retrocomputing on an ICE40 development board.

    This is an implementation of the Acorn Atom on a myStorm BlackIce board. This board is basically just a Lattice iCE40 FPGA, a few support components, and a bunch of pin headers, some of which are in the not-so-handy Arduino pinout footprint. By porting some Acorn Atom implementations and a 6502 core to verilog, [hoglet] was able to stuff a cool old retrocomputer onto an Open Source FPGA development board. Video output is through a resistor DAC driving a VGA cable, and keyboard input is through PS/2.

Survey shows Linux and FreeRTOS out front in embedded tech

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

AspenCore’s 2017 survey of embedded tech developers reveals that open source OSes like Linux and FreeRTOS continue to grow as proprietary platforms decline.

Dozens of market studies are happy to tell you how many IoT gizmos are expected to ship by 2020, but few research firms regularly dig into embedded development trends. That’s where reader surveys come in handy. Our own joint survey with Linux.com readers on hacker board trends offer insights into users of Linux and Android community-backed SBCs. The AspenCore survey of its EETimes and Embedded readers has a smaller sample (1,234 vs. 1,705), but is broader and more in depth, asking many more questions and spanning developers who use a range of OSes on both MCU and application processors.

The survey, which was taken in March and April of this year, does not perfectly represent global trends. The respondents are predominantly located in the U.S. and Canada (56 percent) followed by Europe/ENEA (25 percent), and Asia (11 percent). They also tend to be older, with an average of 24 years out of college, and work at larger, established companies with an average size of 3,452 employees and on teams averaging 15 engineers.

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Security: Uber Sued, Intel ‘Damage Control’, ZDNet FUD, and XFRM Privilege Escalation

  • Uber hit with 2 lawsuits over gigantic 2016 data breach
    In the 48 hours since the explosive revelations that Uber sustained a massive data breach in 2016, two separate proposed class-action lawsuits have been filed in different federal courts across California. The cases allege substantial negligence on Uber’s part: plaintiffs say the company failed to keep safe the data of the affected 50 million customers and 7 million drivers. Uber reportedly paid $100,000 to delete the stolen data and keep news of the breach quiet. On Tuesday, CEO Dara Khosrowshahi wrote: “None of this should have happened, and I will not make excuses for it.”
  • Intel Releases Linux-Compatible Tool For Confirming ME Vulnerabilities [Ed: ‘Damage control’ strategy is to make it look like just a bug.]
    While Intel ME security issues have been talked about for months, confirming fears that have been present about it for years, this week Intel published the SA-00086 security advisory following their own internal review of ME/TXE/SPS components. The impact is someone could crash or cause instability issues, load and execute arbitrary code outside the visibility of the user and operating system, and other possible issues.
  • Open source's big weak spot? Flawed libraries lurking in key apps [Ed: Linux basher Liam Tung entertains FUD firm Snyk and Microsoft because it suits the employer's agenda]
  • SSD Advisory – Linux Kernel XFRM Privilege Escalation

gThumb 3.6 GNOME Image Viewer Released with Better Wayland and HiDPI Support

gThumb, the open-source image viewer for the GNOME desktop environment, has been updated this week to version 3.6, a new stable branch that introduces numerous new features and improvements. gThumb 3.6 comes with better support for the next-generation Wayland display server as the built-in video player, color profiles, and application icon received Wayland support. The video player component received a "Loop" button to allow you to loop videos, and there's now support for HiDPI displays. The app also ships with a color picker, a new option to open files in full-screen, a zoom popover that offers different zoom commands and a zoom slider, support for double-click activation, faster image loading, aspect ratio filtering, and the ability to display the description of the color profile in the property view. Read more Also: Many Broadway HTML5 Backend Improvements Land In GTK4

ExTiX 18.0, 64bit, with Deepin Desktop 15.5 (made in China!) and Refracta Tools – Create your own ExTiX/Ubuntu/Deepin system in minutes!

I’ve made a new extra version of ExTiX with Deepin 15.5 Desktop (made in China!). Deepin is devoted to providing a beautiful, easy to use, safe and reliable system for global users. Only a minimum of packages are installed in ExTiX Deepin. You can of course install all packages you want. Even while running ExTiX Deepin live. I.e. from a DVD or USB stick. Study all installed packages in ExTiX Deepin. Read more Also: ExTiX, the Ultimate Linux System, Now Has a Deepin Edition Based on Ubuntu 17.10 Kali Linux 2017.3 Brings New Hacking Tools — Download ISO And Torrent Files Here