Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Hardware

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • How to build an IoT project with Mongoose OS

    It could be a small single-board computer like the Raspberry Pi, which costs around US $30, BeagleBone for approximately US $60, Intel Edison for US $70, or other similar devices. These computers usually run Linux. These are suitable for some tasks, like being a gateway device, but again they are quite large, very power hungry, and too expensive to run on things like sensors, wearables, and small appliances.

  • A Look at MINIBIAN: A Minimalist Image for Raspberry Pi

    My way of celebrating Pi Day (March 14th = 3.14) was to take a look at an awesome little image for the Raspberry Pi called Minibian. A new edition of Minibian was released on 12 March 2017, updating the image with support for the latest RPi 3B and other improvements.

    Minibian is based on and fully compatible with the official Raspbian “Jesse” software. It is meant to be used for embedded linux and server type situations, and that is great for IoT scenarios. There is no desktop environment and much effort has gone to providing a minimalist operating system that conserves system resources. The 12 March release of Minibian boasts a 15 second boot time, 31 MB of RAM usage, 477 MB of disk space usage, and is small enough to fit on a 1GB SD card. My test install and inspection of Minibian shows that these claims are indeed correct.

  • Tough, 84 x 55mm Intel Atom COM offers soldered memory

    Eurotech’s rugged, Linux-friendly “CPU-163-15” is an 84 x 55mm COM Express Type 10 Mini module with Bay Trail Atoms and soldered ECC and eMMC.

    Eurotech’s Intel Atom E3800 “Bay Trail” based CPU-163-15 COM Express Type 10 Mini module continues the Amaro, Italy based company’s tradition of offering rugged embedded boards with support for its cloud-based Everyware Software Framework (ESF) IoT platform. Other recent Intel-based COM Express modules from Eurotech include the CPU-161-18, a headless COM Express Type 6 Compact module with a 12-core Xeon-D1500 from the Broadwell generation.

  • BQ Deutschland releases Android 7.1.1 OTA for the Aquaris X5 Plus (while most of us still haven't received 7.0)

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • A $6 Linux computer that plays Doom: Could this tiny Chinese clone challenge the Raspberry Pi Zero?

    Another day, another would-be Raspberry Pi challenger, this time the tiny LicheePi Zero, which sells for as little as $6.

  • What it takes for your Linux-based IoT designs to succeed in mass-production IoT

    In Greek mythology, the story of Charon, the ferryman, goes like this: to cross the river Styx to the underworld, souls needed Charon’s guidance. Those who did not get his help were forced to wander the shores, lost for a hundred years.

  • Add Skills to Your Raspberry Pi with Alexa

    One of the leading items on embedded developers’ to-do lists these days is to add Amazon’s Alexa voice agent to a hacker board or another Linux device. Of course, you could simply buy an Alexa-enabled Amazon Echo speaker system for $180 -- or a non-speaker Amazon Echo Dot for only $50 -- but what fun is that? For some, the goal is to recreate the basic Alexa Skills of ordering pizza or asking random question like which countries were finalists in the 2014 World Cup. Others want to go a step further and use Alexa to voice activate robots, smart home devices, dashboard interfaces, and other gizmos using technologies like MQTT. From a hacking perspective, the first stage is easy, said PTR Group CTO and Chief Scientist Mike Anderson at Embedded Linux Conference 2017 in February.

  • Rugged Linux COM powers up with dual-GPU i.MX8 QuadMax

    Toradex revealed the “Apalis iMX8,” the first COM built around NXP’s i.MX8 QuadMax, which boasts 2x Cortex-A72, 4x -A53, 2x -M4F, and 2x GPUs.

  • Compact, rugged, Kaby Lake SBC features robust expansion

    VersaLogic’s rugged, Linux-ready “Lion” SBC offers Intel 7th Gen Core CPUs and SATA 3.0, PCe/104 OneBank, PCI-104, mini-PCIe, and SPI/SPX expansion.

    VersaLogic has continued its line of Linux-friendly, zoologically named PC/104 SBCs with the Lion, which takes on Intel’s latest 7th Generation Core “Kaby Lake” U-series processor. This is the first Kaby Lake based PC/104 board we’ve seen, and the first to offer the OneBank extension scheme. Other PCe/104 OneBank boards include VersaLogic’s Bay Trail Atom based Bengal, as well as Diamond Systems’s Atom N2800 based Atlas and WinSystems’s Apollo Lake Atom based PX1-C415.

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Lichee Pi Zero is a tiny Linux computer module for $6 (crowdfunding)

    The Raspberry Pi Zero has some new competition. A Chinese company is running a crowdfunding campaign for a tiny computer-on-a-module called the Lichee Pi Zero that’s priced as low as $6.

  • ARM/FPGA module runs Debian on Arria 10 SoC

    The Reflex CES Arria 10 SoC SoM runs Linux on the ARM/FPGA Arria 10 SoC, and is available with SBC and PCIe-style carrier boards.

    The Arria 10 SoC SoM has been listed on the Intel FPGA site — the new name for Altera — since October, when iWave’s similarly Arria 10 equipped Arria 10 SoC Module appeared. Enclustra’s Arria 10-based Mercury+ AA1 module was unveiled in January. Reflex CES recently began shipping the Debian Linux driven Arria 10 SoC SoM, along with two optional carrier boards.

  • SMARC 2.0 COM runs Linux on Apollo Lake

    The MSC SM2S-AL SMARC 2.0 “short” COM offers an Apollo Lake SoC, triple display and industrial temp support, and an optional, Linux-driven starter kit.

  • Nintendo NES Classic Mini

    After months of trying, I've finally got my hands on a Nintendo NES Classic Mini. It's everything I wish retropie was: simple, reliable, plug-and-play gaming. I didn't have a NES at the time, so the games are all mostly new to me (although I'm familiar with things like Super Mario Brothers).

Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Book review: Up to no good with 'Raspberry Pi for Secret Agents'

    It all started with the Raspberry Pi as a Christmas present, and we started with the Raspberry Pi Education Manual as our guide. As a free download, it was a very good primer to get started. Then we moved onto other books, such as Getting Started with Raspberry Pi, and I started to notice some patterns. Those books often covered the same things over and over: getting the system to boot with Raspbian, visual programming with Scratch, and using the GPIO pins. Also, I noticed that the books focused on how to use the disparate features of the Raspberry Pi, but they didn’t have a common goal or theme in mind. Both of these observations led to my next observation that my daughter’s excitement in Raspberry Pi books started to wane because it felt like we were slogging through math textbooks as opposed to reading with an exciting goal in mind.

  • Industrial thin Mini-ITX runs on 7th Gen Intel CPUs

    Congatec’s “Conga-IC175” is a Linux-friendly thin Mini-ITX board with Kaby Lake CPUs, wide-range power, Intel Optane support, and PCIe and M.2 expansion.

  • Qnap launches TS-453Bmini NAS
  • QNAP Announces the TS-453Bmini Vertical NAS

Hardware and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware

Hardware and Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Snowden calls for AMD to open source

    Whistle blowing spook Edward Snowden says that AMD could kick Intel to death if it open sources its PSP and firmware.

    In an odd tweet, Snowden appeared to be jolly excited about the release of AMD’s new Ryzen desktop processor. But he said that the release of such a good product would be a good moment for AMD to open source their PSP & firmware.

    “In the next cycles, many will discuss replacing Intel. This is a low-cost, low-risk opportunity for AMD to distinguish themselves from Intel on an on-going basis. It's a shame to miss it,” he wrote.

  • AMD Ryzen with Ubuntu – Here is what you have to do to fix constant crashes!
  • AMD Ryzen with Ubuntu - Here is What You Have to Do to Fix Constant Crashes

    Of course, you can always download the kernel of your choice from the Mainline Kernel PPA, and use dpkg to install it yourself as well, rather than rely on their script.

  • How to Build a Linux Rig

    When building a machine, you must take manufacturer into consideration if you’re building for Linux. If you want a Linux machine and don’t want to worry that your build won’t work, there are several vendors to choose from (one of which is Dell). If you want all your Steam games to work, the best choice of Linux to put on it (short of putting Steam OS on it) is Ubuntu Linux. In the following article, I’m going to walk you through how to pick parts for your Linux machine.

Raspberry Pi Projects

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
HowTos
  • Program LEGO Mindstorms robots over WiFi with BrickPi

    For the past year, I've been teaching students how to build and program robots using the LEGO Mindstorms EV3 platform. From the outset, I wanted to find a way to use Scratch and other open source programming languages to extend the capabilities of the platform. That search led me to BrickPi, a Raspberry Pi add-on board from Dexter Industries that easily interfaces with Mindstorms sensors and motors. I requested a teacher trial to see what it could do.

  • Try the Raspberry PIXEL Platform on Your Desktop

    Anyone familiar with Linux likely has some knowledge of the Raspberry Pi. That may not necessarily equate to having experienced one of the greatest embedded platforms on the planet.

    If you’re unfamiliar with the Pi, let me introduce you. The tagline for the Raspberry Pi is Teach, learn, and make with Raspberry Pi. The Pi is a series of single board computers (developed by the Raspberry Pi Foundation) to promote the teaching of basic computer science. Thing is, the small-form factor device became incredibly popular beyond the educational environment. People around the globe embraced these boards and, with the help of embedded Linux, began to invent. To that end, as of September, 2016, more than 10 million Raspberry Pi boards have been sold.

  • A beginner’s guide to Raspberry Pi 3

    On Windows, just right click on the card and choose the formatting option. If you're on desktop Linux, different DEs use different tools, and covering all the DEs is beyond the scope of this story. I have written a tutorial using the command line interface on Linux to format an SD card with Fat32 file system.

More Devices

Filed under
Hardware
  • Can I host my site at home on a Raspberry Pi? YES!

    Escape the fogginess and uncertainty of a cloud solution and host your own site at home. A recent convergence of technologies has made this obvious solution both simple and desirable.

  • FriendlyElec releases Ubuntu Linux-ready NanoPi M1 Plus -- a $30 Raspberry Pi killer

    The Raspberry Pi line of mini computers -- including the all-new Pi Zero W -- are wonderful devices for what they are. Quite frankly, they have inspired many young people to learn about programming, while helping makers to create some really cool projects. With that said, the Pi computers are not the only System on a Chip solutions on the market. Actually, there are more powerful ARM-based offerings available. The problem? They are often radically more expensive than Raspberry Pi.

  • Ultimaker files first patents, remains 'committed' to open source 3D printer development

    Netherlands-based 3D printer manufacturer Ultimaker has filed its first ever patents. The company says the patents are “defensive,” to protect against patent infringement lawsuits, and that it remains “100% committed to [its] open source ethos.”

Razer and Ryzen with Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Razer Is Planning Better Laptop Support On Linux

    Razer co-founder and CEO Min-Liang Tan has shared plans to improve their Linux support, at least when it comes to their Blade laptops.

    Razer hasn't provided official support for their products under Linux, although some community members have created third-party tools for customizing their keyboards, mice, and other gaming peripherals under Linux. Recently, Razer has been getting into the high-end laptop game and while it's x86 hardware, they are looking to ensure it's a good Linux experience.

  • Extra AMD Ryzen 7 1800X Linux Benchmarks

    Assuming you have already checked out this morning's Ryzen 7 1800X Linux benchmarks, here are some more data points while putting the finishing touches on the Ryzen 7 Linux gaming benchmarks being published later today.

    For these interim benchmarks are some more data from the AMD Ryzen 7 1800X that I've done in my benchmarks since receiving this processor yesterday.

  • AMD Ryzen/Zen Currently Doesn't Support Coreboot Today

    Back in 2011 was the glorious announcement that AMD would support Coreboot with its future CPUs. Sadly, a lot has changed at AMD over the past half-decade, and there isn't any Coreboot support to find today for Zen/Ryzen.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Top 4 CDN services for hosting open source libraries
    A CDN, or content delivery network, is a network of strategically placed servers located around the world used for the purpose of delivering files faster to users. A traditional CDN will allow you to accelerate your website's images, CSS files, JS files, and any other piece of static content. This allows website owners to accelerate all of their own content as well as provide them with additional features and configuration options. These premium services typically require payment based on the amount of bandwidth a project uses. However, if your project doesn't justify the cost of implementing a traditional CDN, the use of an open source CDN may be more suitable. Typically, these types of CDNs allow you to link to popular web-based libraries (CSS/JS frameworks, for example), which are then delivered to your web visitors from the free CDN's servers. Although CDN services for open source libraries do not allow you to upload your own content to their servers, they can help you accelerate libraries globally and improve your website's redundancy.
  • Users stand up, speak out, and deliver data on OpenStack growth
    Last week, the OpenStack Foundation announced the results of its ninth user survey. OpenStack users responded in record-breaking numbers to participate, and their voices as revealed in the data tell the real story of OpenStack. The OpenStack community is growing, thriving with new users, deployments, code contributions, and collaborations, all on the rise. User diversity is expanding across geographies and organizational sizes. And OpenStack's ability to integrate with innovative technologies is paving the way for advancements not even dreamed of just five years ago.
  • How to get started learning to program

Huawei, Google supercharge Android with new Raspberry Pi-like board

Prepare to run Android at blazing fast speeds on a new Raspberry Pi-like computer developed by Huawei. Huawei's HiKey 960 computer board is priced at US$239 but has some of the latest CPU and GPU technologies. Google, ARM, Huawei, Archermind, and LeMaker all played roles in developing the board. The HiKey 960 is meant to be a go-to PC for Android or a tool to develop software and drivers for the OS. The board development was backed by Linaro, an organization that develops software packages for the Android OS and ARM architecture. Read more

Debian Derivatives: Q4OS and Devuan

  • Debian-Based Q4OS 1.8.4 Operating System Lets Users Select Alternative Desktops
    Today, April 26, 2017, the developers behind the Debian-based Q4OS GNU/Linux distribution announced the release of the fourth stability and security update of the Q4OS 1.8 "Orion" series. Q4OS 1.8.4 comes almost two months after the release of the previous point release, and besides incorporating all the security patches backported from the upstream repositories of the Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" operating system series, it adds an exciting new feature, namely the integration of alternative desktop environments.
  • Which is Free, Which is Open … [Also]

    Devuan and Debian need not defer to the Open Source Initiative regarding what is Open Source, since the OSI is just using Debian's Free Software Guidelines. Debian's Free Software Guidelines are a definition of Free Software, not specifically Open Source. At the time they were created, RMS personally approved of them as "a good definition of Free Software".

Leftovers: Software

  • Luminance HDR 2.5.0 Released, Here’s How to Install it on Ubuntu
    Luminance HDR is an open-source tool that lets you create and edit high-dynamic-range images (HDR) on Linux, Windows and macOS. The app recently got its first major update in several years and I figured it was something a few of you might wanna know about (and hey, we’ve featured a couple of other photography tools recently).
  • SMPlayer 17.4.2 Open-Source Media Player Supports MPlayer's ffhevcvdpau Decoder
    A new stable update of the open-source and cross-platform SMPlayer media player was announced recently, versioned 17.4.2, for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux and Microsoft Windows. SMPlayer 17.4.2 is now the latest stable release of the popular media player applications, and it looks like it ships with various exciting improvements and new features. One of these is support for using the ffhevcvdpau decoder from the MPlayer project, but only on Linux-based operating systems.
  • Gyazo – An Easy Way to Capture Screenshots, GIFs and Save Websites
    Gyazo is a screen capturing application with which you can quickly take quality shots of your screen and also create GIFs on the fly with a simple click. It is as simple to use as another screen capture tool we wrote on earlier, Peek, but Gyazo seems to have an edge in terms of functionality, customizability, and extension; at least, for now.
  • The many ways of running firefox on OpenBSD

    Maybe i haven't talked about it enough on the lists, but since i've been maintaining the various mozillas in the portstree (cvs log says i started around firefox 3.6.something... 7 years ago. *sigh*) a lot of things changed, so i wanted take the 6.1 release as an occasion to sum up the various ways one could run which version of which firefox on which version of OpenBSD.