Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Hardware

Open Hardware/Modding/Hacking

Filed under
Hardware
Software
OSS
  • Libre Computer's Tritium Is A Line Of Low-Cost Allwinner ARM Boards

    In addition to Le Potato and Renegade, another line-up of ARM boards being offered by Libre Computer is Tritium. The Libre Computer Tritium boards are Allwinner-based boards with options from the H2+ for IoT use-cases, the H3 as a mid-range offering, or H5 for a better-performing ARM board that is well supported by the open-source Linux community.

  • See Binary On Your Breadboard

    When you’re debugging a board which has an ESP32, Raspberry Pi, or Arduino, it’s easy to slap on a small LCD display or connect via WiFi to see what’s wrong. At least, that’s what the kids are doing. But what if you’re old-school or you don’t have one of those pimped-out, steroid-filled boards? A resistor and an LED will often suffice. Powering the LED means one thing and not powering it means another. And with seven more LEDs you can even display 0-256 in binary.

    [Miguel] is clearly in the latter camp. To make debugging-with-LEDs easy, he’s come up with an 8-LED board complete with resistors. He’s even included the Gerber files needed for you to make your own. One row of pins are all connected together and the other row are not. So whether you’re using common cathode or common anode depends on how you orient the LEDs when you solder them in place. You might perhaps have one board of each type at the ready.

  • Ancient Hardware I Have Hacked: Back to Basics!

    My return to the IBM mainframe was delayed by my high school's acquisition of a a teletype connected via a 110-baud serial line to a timesharing system featuring the BASIC language. I was quite impressed with this teletype because it could type quite a bit faster than I could. But this is not as good as it might sound, given that I came in dead last in every test of manual dexterity that the school ever ran us through. In fact, on a good day, I might have been able to type 20 words a minute, and it took decades of constant practice to eventually get above 70 words a minute. In contrast, one of the teachers could type 160 words a minute, more than half again faster than the teletype could!

    Aside from output speed, I remained unimpressed with computers compared to paper and pencil, let alone compared to my pocket calculator. And given that this was old-school BASIC, there was much to be unimpressed about. You could name your arrays anything you wanted, as long as that name was a single upper-case character. Similarly, you could name your scalar variables anything you wanted, as long as that name was either a single upper-case character or a single upper-case character followed by a single digit. This allowed you to use up to 286 variables, up to 26 of which could be arrays. If you felt that GOTO was harmful, too bad. If you wanted a while loop, you could make one out of IF statements. Not only did IF statements have no else clause, the only thing that could be in the THEN clause was the number of the line to which control would transfer when the IF condition evaluated to true. And each line had to be numbered, and the numbers had to be monotonically increasing, that is, in the absence of control-flow statements, the program would execute the lines of code in numerical order, regardless of the order in which you typed those lines of code. Definitely a step down, even from FORTRAN.

  • Guile-CV version 0.2.0

    This is a 'milestone' release, which introduces image texture measures. In addition (a) the default installation locations have changed; (Cool there is a new configure option; (c) some new interfaces; (d) matrix multiplication performances have been greatly improved; (d) a few interface (name) have changed.

    For a list of changes since the previous version, visit the NEWS file. For a complete description, consult the git summary and git log

The Slimbook Pro2 is here - Very, VERY nice

Filed under
KDE
Hardware
Reviews

The Slimbook started just fine. Everything seems to be in perfect order. The system firmware was up to date, and the BIOS/UEFI was already configured for VT-d. Furthermore, both TPM and Secure Boot were disabled, which actually suits me well. The internal disk is labeled ubuntu, though. And the reason is ...

The Slimbook team also installed Ubuntu on the disk (they mentioned it alongside hardware upgrades), to make sure everything worked fine. I had the option to use their installation with a generic root/slimbook account combo, or wipe everything and start fresh. I had ordered the machine without any OS, and intended to do the setup myself, primarily because I also wanted to use full-disk encryption. Another downside of having a preinstalled system is that there's no two-part OEM setup for Ubuntu, so the vendor must configure the user side for you too. No matter, it's going away anyway.

Now, the actual operating system choice - Linux. As I mentioned in the past, ever since my love-at-first-sight encounter with Kubuntu 17.04, I wanted to deploy Kubuntu in my production setup, and this purchase finally allowed me to do so. I grabbed the ISO, etched it to a thumb drive, and let the system boot. There were no issues. All the hardware was correctly initialized, including the Wireless.

I did a bunch of speed tests, and I get a full, flat 80 Mbps rate that matches the test line, in both the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz bands. No issues whatsoever, and this is important. In comparison, my significantly cheaper, older and driver-problematic Lenovo G50 with the Realtek card only does about 40 Mbps under the same conditions.

I had been worried regarding the Wireless - but then I thought, the Slimbook guys wouldn't be selling this hardware if there were problems, now would they? Of course, if you type any which Wireless card into a search engine, and then add the string linux, you will get tons of forum posts, bug threads and whatnot detailing a neverending story of problems. With my Slimbook Pro2, it was smooth sailing.

Read more

Also: KDE Connect on IRC and Matrix.org

Apollo Lake industrial computer offers wide range of display panels

Filed under
Hardware

Cincoze’s “P1101” embedded PC is built around an Intel Apollo Lake SoC, and offers -40 to 70°C support, shock and vibration resistance, triple displays, and support for Cincoze’s CDS line of display panels.

Cincoze has launched a new line of P1100 “fanless slim embedded computers” starting with a P1101 model. The company describes the product line as “One Computer, Two Appliances,” which means it can be used as a standalone embedded computer or mounted on one of Cincoze’s many CDS-branded panel displays to turn it into a panel PC.

Read more

Open Hardware: DIY Blynk Board and More Code From SiFive HiFive RISC-V Developers

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Program an IoT pushbutton with a DIY Blynk Board

    In my previous article, I explained how to set up a DIY Blynk Board using an ESP8266 based microcontroller. Blynk is an easy way to start creating Internet of Things projects. It's not tied to any specific board, so you can use the platform to control Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and other hardware of your choice over the internet.

    The DIY Blynk Board comes with more than 10 preconfigured projects. My earlier article showed how to set up the DIY Blynk Board and test the first project: using the button widget to receive a digital input and produce a digital output. Specifically, pressing a button on the Blynk app toggled a physical LED attached to the board.

  • SiFive Releases HiFive Unleashed RISC-V Open-Source Boot Loader With DDR Initialization

    Back in June we brought up how some of the SiFive HiFive Unleashed initialization code was closed-source for this developer board built around the RISC-V open-source processor ISA. One of the pain points was the DDR memory initialization code being closed-source but then SiFive announced they would allow for a fully open-source boot process. They've now made good on their word with their new open-source project.

    On Thursday the company announced the open-source release of the Freedom U540-C000's Bootloader. This open-source bootloader allows for booting this first Linux-compatible RISC-V developer board without relying upon closed-source bits -- including the DDR init code being open. They have also posted the contents of the mask ROM as well for reference.

Compact thin client runs on Raspberry Pi 3 B+

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Clientron has launched an “S-Cube Pi 3 B+ Thin Client” built around the Raspberry Pi 3 B+ SBC with Citrix XenDesktop, Microsoft RDP, and VMware Horizon View support.

The S-Cube Pi 3 B+ Thin Client is the first thin client we’ve seen built around the new Raspberry Pi 3 B+ SBC. This is Clientron’s first Arm-based thin client, as well as its smallest and most power efficient model to date, running on less than 5 Watts.

Read more

5 Best Low Budget Linux Laptops and Computers to Buy Today

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Linux Operating Systems are undoubtedly the best choice of OS to run on old hardware while maintaining an efficient-enough workflow and productivity rank – look at the Raspberry Pi, for example.

If you’re reading this article then you probably already know that if your budget is relatively low to purchase a high-end Windows or Mac laptop, below is our compilation of the best Linux computers that you can purchase without selling any hardware parts.

Read more

This Is Your Solution For Open Source Motion Tracking

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

The HTC Vive Tracker adds real-world objects to your virtual world. While these real-world objects in virtual environments are now mostly limited to a Nintendo Zapper for a Duck Hunt clone and a tennis racket, the future is clear: we’re going to be playing Duck Hunt and Wii Sports while wearing headsets. The future is so bright, it burns.

Of course, with any piece of neat computing hardware, there’s an opportunity for building an Open Source clone. That’s what [Drix] is doing with his Hackaday Prize entry. He’s created an Open Source Vive Tracker. It’s called the HiveTracker, and it is right now the best solution for tracking objects in a 3D space.

After a few missteps with ultrasonic and magnetic approaches, the team decided to piggyback on the HTC Vive lighthouses. These two base stations scan a laser beam across the room, first vertically, then horizontally. It’s an incredible piece of technology that [Alan Yates] talked about at the 2016 Hackaday Superconference.

Read more

Devices: TaraXL and Librem 5

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Stereo vision camera pumps up images with Jetson TX2

    E-con’s “TaraXL” stereo vision camera works with Nvidia’s Linux-driven Jetson TX2 module and other Tegra based systems to stream 3D depth maps with 752 x 480 resolution at up to 50fps over USB 3.0.

    E-con Systems’ TaraXL is designed for stereo vision imaging applications including autonomous driving, robotics, drones, mixed reality applications, people detection/counting, stock level monitoring, volume measurements, and proximity warning systems. Like the very similar, two-year old Tara camera, the TaraXL has a USB 3.0 interface and is built around a pair of OnSemi 1/3-inch MT9V024 CMOS image sensors, which enable WVGA Global shutter monochrome image capture. The main difference is that the TaraXL SDK is five times faster than the Tara SDK, claims E-con.

  • Librem 5, the world’s first ethical, user-controlled smartphone, makes steady progress for initial shipping beginning April 2019

    Purism, the social purpose corporation which designs and produces popular digital rights respecting hardware, software, and services, is sharing the much anticipated progress and scheduling for its Librem 5 smartphone.

  • Progress update from the Librem 5 hardware department

    As you might have noted when we announced closing the development kit “last call” sale, new specifications have been made public. I want to explain what led to these specifications and why we made the choices we made and what the current timeline is for the devkits and Librem 5 phones.

    We want to make a secure mobile communication device which can offer on-par experience similar to today’s smartphones, while making it as free and transparent to the extent we can given the reality of today. We take the notion of “free” or “libre” seriously, striving to comply with the Free Software Foundation (FSF) strict “Respects Your Freedom” (RYF) requirements. Having that endorsement is an important and critical goal for us. The RYF criteria rules out a substantial amount of hardware, making finding RYF complaint phone hardware a challenging endeavor. It would have been relatively trivial to produce a smartphone with non-free GPU drivers and a CPU with combined radios + CPU + GPU in a few months, but creating a regular smartphone is not our goal. We have much higher aspirations.

CompuLab Goes WILD With Debian-Based Android WiFi RTT Indoor Location Tracking

Filed under
Android
Hardware

The folks at the Linux-friendly CompuLab hardware vendor have introduced WILD, the first WiFi RTT access point to allow for WiFi indoor location detection/tracking with supported Android 9 smartphones. CompuLab WILD is able to deliver under 0.5 meter accuracy.

WiFi RTT is the standard for real-time, accurate indoor location tracking. CompuLab's Wi-Fi Indoor Location Device (WILD) is the first RTT-enabled access point using Intel 8260 Wireless-AC and dual Gigabit Ethernet for the traffic handling.

Read more

Also: Controlling the Energenie 433MHz mains switch with an ATTiny

Hardware: Purism Librem 5 and ROC-RK3328-CC

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Purism Pushes Back The Librem 5 Linux Smartphone Release Date

    We knew it was pretty much inevitable, but Purism's embargo has just expired confirming the news that the Librem 5 smartphone will not be released in January as originally planned.

    Purism is announcing today that there's been a three-month delay in releasing the Librem 5 GNU/Linux smartphone. The new release plan is to begin shipping the units in April 2019.

  • ROC-RK3328-CC: A Raspberry Pi Competitor With Gigabit Ethernet, USB3, DDR4

    The folks from LoverPi.com have sent out some of their newest ARM SBCs. What we're taking a look and benchmarking first is the Libre Computer Board ROC-RK3328-CC. Pricing on this board, which was developed between the Libre Computer Project and Firefly, starts at $35 USD with 1GB of DDR4 but at $80 USD a 4GB version can be acquired. This quad-core 64-bit ARM board has modern features like Gigabit Ethernet, USB 3.0, and other interfaces over what is found with current generation Raspberry Pi hardware.

    [...]

    Officially supported by this Libre Computer Board is Android 7.1.1 and Ubuntu 16.04 by Firefly. The Libre Computer Project also has Ubuntu 18.04 and Debian 9 images available that make use of Rockchip's Linux 4.4 LTS kernel.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Security: 'Cyber' Wars, IPFS, Updates and PHP FUD

Graphics: CodeXL, X.Org Server, FreeDesktop.org and SIMD32

  • CodeXL 2.6 is released!
    For current users of CodeXL, this new release may look and feel a little different. The AMD Developer Tools team has been busy working on many new tools, some of which replicate functionality found in older versions of CodeXL. Thus, to limit confusion for our users, we have removed several major components from CodeXL.
  • AMD CodeXL 2.6 Advances GPU Profiling, Static Analysis & GPU Debugging
    But what is found within CodeXL 2.6 for GPU developers are the GPU profiling features, static analysis features, and GPU debugging features.
  • [ANNOUNCE] xorg-server 1.20.2
    Lots of bugfixes all over the map. Thanks to all for testing and patches!
  • X.Org Server 1.20.2 Released With A Bunch Of Bug Fixes
    It's almost been a half-year already since the release of the long delayed X.Org Server 1.20, but with no signs of X.Org Server 1.21 releasing soon, xorg-server 1.20.2 was announced today as the latest stable point release.
  • FreeDesktop.org Might Formally Join Forces With The X.Org Foundation
    FreeDesktop.org is already effectively part of X.Org given the loose structure of FreeDesktop.org, the key members/administrators being part of both projects, and FreeDesktop.org long being the de facto hosting platform from the X.Org Server to Mesa and much more. But now they may be officially joining forces. As a formality, the X.Org Foundation is seeking to change their foundation's by-laws to reflect that the X.Org Foundation shall also "Support free and open source projects through the freedesktop.org infrastructure. For projects outside the scope [of the X.Org Foundation] support extends to project hosting only."
  • Experimental Patches For Using SIMD32 Fragment Shaders With Intel's Linux Driver
    Existing Intel graphics hardware already supports SIMD32 fragment shaders and the Intel open-source Linux graphics driver has supported this mode for months, but it hasn't been enabled. That though is in the process of changing. Since June the Intel Mesa driver's fragment shader code has supported the SIMD32 mode supported by the past number of generations of Intel graphics hardware, but it hasn't actually been turned on. That enabling wasn't done over not having the heuristics in place for determining when to enable it over the other code paths.

8 of the Best Free Linux Comic Book Viewers (Updated 2018)

A comic book is a magazine which consists of narrative artwork in the form of sequential images with text that represent individual scenes. Panels are often accompanied by brief descriptive prose and written narrative, usually dialog contained in word balloons emblematic of the comics art form. Comics are used to tell a story, and are published in a number of different formats including comic strips, comic books, webcomics, Manga, and graphic novels. Some comics have been published in a tabloid form. The largest comic book market is Japan. Many users associate desktop Linux with their daily repetitive grind. However, we are always on the look out for applications that help make Linux fun to use. It really is a great platform for entertainment. Some document viewers offer a good range of different formats. Although they are not dedicated comic book viewers, Evince and okular have support for the common comic book archive files, and merit mention here. Read more