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Hardware

OBD II connected fleet computer runs Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

iWave’s ARM-based “OBD II” car computer features 4G LTE, WiFi, Bluetooth, GPS, an IMU, and an OBD II connector to onboard telematics.

iWave’s “Connected Car Device – OBD II” is an OEM-focused automotive device for fleet management, driving behavior, insurance company monitoring, cab aggregators, remote diagnostics, two-wheeler applications, and “immobilization,” which may refer to breathalyzer connected gear.

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Hardware: Samsung (Tizen Inside), AMD and ARM

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Samsung Gear POP – New fitness device on its way as it gets bluetooth certified
  • AMD Confirms Linux Performance Marginality Problem Affecting Some, Doesn't Affect Epyc / TR

    This morning I was on a call with AMD and they are now able to confirm they have reproduced the Ryzen "segmentation fault issue" and are working with affected customers.

    AMD engineers found the problem to be very complex and characterize it as a performance marginality problem exclusive to certain workloads on Linux. The problem may also affect other Unix-like operating systems such as FreeBSD, but testing is ongoing for this complex problem and is not related to the recently talked about FreeBSD guard page issue attributed to Ryzen. AMD's testing of this issue under Windows hasn't uncovered problematic behavior.

  • Chip IP designer ARM becomes “Arm” — or is it arm?

    Chip IP designer ARM Holdings has released a video that rebrands itself as “Arm” and promises to bring “happiness for everyone.”

    Eleven months after UK based semiconductor IP designer ARM Holdings was acquired by Japanese technology giant Softbank Group for about $31 billion, Arm has quietly rebranded itself with a hipper, lower-case “arm” logo. The strapless new look first debuted in a platitude rich Aug. 1 YouTube video (see below) spotted on Underconsideration.com’s BrandNew page. The name change seemed to have been challenged by a bit of indecision, judging by the recent edit history on Arm’s Wikipedia page (see Aug. 7, 2017 screenshot farther below), and the Arm website shows some examples of ARM, Arm, and arm. In an email to LinuxGizmos, Phil Hughes, Arm’s Director of Public Relations, wrote: “basically arm is all lowercase for the logo and when used in text is Arm.”

The Price of Freedom — A Review of the Librem 15 v3

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Hardware
Reviews

Purism is a wild startup located in South San Francisco. Their mission? Providing a superior hardware experience for people who love privacy and software freedom. Purism is building and shipping GNU/Linux laptops, and is interested in developing a phone as well.

The Purism campaign originally launched on CrowdSupply late 2014. Since then, the company has shipped two revisions, and now offers three different models to choose from: an 11-inch convertible tablet, a 13-inch laptop, and a 15-inch powerhouse.

For a few years, I have strongly desired having a quality Linux laptop that has great hardware. So, I’ve taken the plunge on getting the latest 15-inch Librem model from Purism.

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Open Source 3-D Printing and Arduino

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Hardware
OSS
  • UK research team 3D prints open source microscope prototype for only £30

    Just days ago we wrote about an open source 3D printed microscope that could be made for as little as €100 ($118). Now, another project, undertaken by researchers from the University of Bath in the UK, has even higher aspirations than that as it has made a prototype of a 3D printed microscope for only £30 ($40).

  • 3D Robotics open-sources its Solo drone control software
  • Introducing OpenSolo: 3DR Open-Sources Solo Drone Code
  • OpenSolo Initiative – by the ArduPilot Team

    The benefits to existing Solo users are many; the community is now free to maintain and improve upon an established codebase containing many innovative technologies, and developers will be able to “hack” or improve nearly every part of their Solo from now on, including the Controller! The Open Source community in general will also benefit from more generally applicable technologies such as SmartShots and the Artoo controller.

  • Arduino announces developer workshop following Musto ouster

    Arduino opened registration for an Arduino Core Developers Workshop following a shakeup in which controversial CEO Federico Musto left the company.

    Arduino developers who are wondering what the new Arduino will look like after last week’s shakeup can now sign up for an Arduino Core Developers Workshop to be held in Turin, Italy, from Sep. 29 through Oct. 1 (see farther below). Will the company shift entirely to RISC-V? Will Linux remain part off Arduino’s future? And can it compete both with Espressif’s ESP32 and the Raspberry Pi? Hardware aside, what happened to that open source Arduino Foundation? Maybe we’ll even solve the latest Shroud of Turin mystery.

  • Gumstix offers customizable suite of LoRa modules and boards

    Gumstix has added LoRa add-ons to its Geppetto board design service that work with a RisingRF LoRa module, and launched Overo, Pi, and Arduino LoRa boards.

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Big Changes in Arduino and News About Open Source 3-D Printing

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Hardware
  • Federico Musto is out as Arduino CEO

    Last week Arduino AG, the holding company for the open source Arduino project, announced that CEO Federico Musto stepped down, to be replaced with Massimo Banzi as new Chairman and CTO of Arduino and Dr. Fabio Violante as CEO.

    The move comes after the maker community found troubling discrepancies in Musto’s educational claims.

  • Inexpensive Robot with Open Source, 3D Printed Components Cracks a Safe in 30 Minutes at Hacker Convention

    While the 3D printed, PIN-protected door lock by HPI looks cool, I’m pretty sure that a determined thief would find a way to get past it. The 3D printed, heavy duty Stealth Key system looks to be much more difficult to get around, but what’s even more high-tech than a lock or a key? A safe. But a team from Colorado-based SparkFun Electronics, an online retail store that sells pieces for electronics projects, recently used an inexpensive, homemade robot, which features some 3D printed components, to crack open a SentrySafe safe in front of hundreds of excited onlookers at a convention for hackers in Las Vegas.

  • Pedro Petit Open Source 3D Printed Robotic Arm (video)

    If you are looking to learn more about robotics you may be interested in a new project which is being posted to the Hackaday website, detailing how to build a 3D printed open source robotic arm complete with built in control panel.

    Watch the demonstration video below to learn more about the Pedro Petit open source DIY robotic arm which is being created by Hackaday user saandial.

Graphics: ATI/AMD, Radeon, Vega

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware

Open-source Hardware and 3D-Printing

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Hardware
  • Efabless launches open-source hardware design portal

    Efabless Corp. (San Jose, Calif.) has opened a website called Chiplicity that offers an online design framework for the design, verification, prototyping and prototyping of mixed-signal ASICs.

    Chiplicity supports community-developed intellectual property cores (IP cores) and ICs and allows community members to create, share, make derivatives of and commercialize their mixed-signal ICs. Chiplicity includes all the tools needed for a full design cycle from idea to completed manufacturable GDSII files. Community members can manufacture their designs as prototypes through Efabless on shuttles at German foundry X-Fab.

  • FlyPi: an open source 3D printed microscope that can be made for €100

    Those of us who were fortunate enough to attend well funded schools might take for granted that laboratory equipment, such as microscopes, are actually quite expensive. This, of course, means that most schools around the globe do not have access to scientific equipment which can be used to teach, train, and research.

  • Better Call Saul needed 3D printing and an Arduino to arm Mike Ehrmantraut

Jolla Tablet Setback, Linux on Devices, and End of Windows Phone

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Microsoft
  • Jolla Tablet refund update

    Dear Jolla Tablet contributor, As promised, we are beginning to process the refunds further on cash flow positive months by randomly selecting a number of backers and providing them with a few of options in order to handle their refund situation. As of end of July is now at hand, we can confirm the financial situation is allowing us to start the process with 100 random backers. While admittedly that is not a huge number, it is what the situation permits us to do so far. We are determined to continue with the process each month we have a positive cash flow.

  • Rugged Skylake box PC offers up to 8x USB and 5x HDMI ports

    Advantech’s Linux-ready “UNO-2484G” Box PC offers dual-core 6th Gen U-series CPUs, 4x GbE ports, and either HDMI/USB or “iDoor” expansion units.

    Like Advantech’s Linux-on-Quark based UNO-1252G IoT gateway and Intel Apollo Lake based ARK-1124C embedded computer, the new Skylake based UNO-2484G embedded PC offers up to four of the company’s homegrown “iDoor” expansion modules. The mini-PCIe based iDoor modules, which include varying mixes of wired and/or wireless features, are protected in an enclosure extension located on the bottom of the unit.

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  • Microsoft culture led to Windows Phone failure: ex-Apple chief

     

    "Microsoft’s smartphone troubles started well before the birth of Android," he said. "In a reversal of the famous dictum Victory Has Many Fathers But Defeat Is An Orphan, Windows Phone’s collapse seems to have had many progenitors deeply embedded in the company’s decades-old culture."

AMD With Linux: AMDGPU, AMDGPU-PRO, and RadeonSI

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware
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More in Tux Machines

OSS: Meteoric Rise of Open Source, Document Foundation, Facebook U-Turn, Collaborative Knowledge Foundation, Slovenia Open Data

  • The Meteoric Rise Of Open Source And Why Investors Should Care
    The adoption and integration of open-source technologies have rapidly usurped the closed-source incumbents, so much so that investors are pouring record amounts of money into open-source software investments.
  • Coming up on 28th September: Reddit “Ask us Anything” (and a birthday)
    Thursday, 28th September 2017 will be a special day – not only is it the seventh birthday of The Document Foundation, but we will also be running an “Ask me (us) Anything” session on Reddit – specifically, the /r/linux subreddit.
  • Facebook U-turn: React, other libraries freed from unloved patent license
    Faced with growing dissatisfaction about licensing requirements for some of its open-source projects, Facebook today said it will move React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js under the MIT license next week. "We're relicensing these projects because React is the foundation of a broad ecosystem of open source software for the web, and we don't want to hold back forward progress for nontechnical reasons," said Facebook engineering director Adam Wolff in a blog post on Friday. Wolff said while Facebook continues to believe its BSD + Patents license has benefits, "we acknowledge that we failed to decisively convince this community."
  • New Collaboration To Deliver Open-Source Submission And Peer-Review Platform
    This week, eLife and Collaborative Knowledge Foundation announced a partnership “to build a user-driven, open-source submission and peer-review platform” aimed at improving on existing industry models. Working together, the two organisations “hope to accelerate progress in delivering a modern, fast and user-driven system,” they said in a press release. “The project will be designed to help streamline communications between authors, editors and reviewers at all stages of the submission and review process.”
  • Slovenia publishes statistics on open data portal
    As of this month, the Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia is making available 3374 data collections on the country’s open data portal, making it by far the portal’s biggest contributor. The Ministry of Labour, Family, Social Affairs and Equal Opportunities comes second, with 62 datasets.

End of Debian-Administration.org and 32-bit Support in Manjaro Linux

  • Retiring the Debian-Administration.org site
    So previously I've documented the setup of the Debian-Administration website, and now I'm going to retire it I'm planning how that will work.
  • Manjaro Linux Discontinues 32-bit Support
    You might already know that I love Manjaro Linux. And as an ardent Manjaro Linux fan, I have a bad news for you. Recently, Philip, the lead developer of Manjaro Linux, announced that the project would be dropping support for the 32-bit architecture. He said that the reason for the move was “due to the decreasing popularity of i686 among the developers and the community”.

Android Leftovers

Red Hat and Fedora: Patent Promise and Fedora Community

  • Red Hat Enlarges Its Open Source Patent Promise Umbrella
    Red Hat on Thursday announced major enhancements to the Patent Promise it first published 15 years ago, with the intention of providing new protections to innovation in the open source community. In its 2002 Patent Promise, Red Hat vowed not to pursue patent infringement actions against parties that used its covered Free and Open Source Software, or FOSS, subject to certain limitations. The current Patent Promise reaffirms the 2002 pledge and extends the zone of non-enforcement.
  • Red Hat breaks new ground with open source Patent Promise
    Red Hat has decided to revise its 2002 Patent Promise that originally signalled the company’s intention not to enforce its patents against free and open source software. The company, which is famed for its open source approach, had laid out in its original promise that it was designed to discourage patent aggression against free and open source software. The updated version not only reaffirms this but “extends the zone of non-enforcement.”
  • Two Docs Workshops at Flock 2017
  • Documentation and Modularity at Flock 2017
  • Join the Magazine team
    The recent Flock conference of Fedora contributors included a Fedora Magazine workshop. Current editorial board members Ryan Lerch, Justin W. Flory, and Paul W. Frields covered how to join and get started as an author. Here are some highlights of the workshop and discussion that took place.