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Hardware

Raspberry Pi Zero and Zero W: Linux computing in an even smaller package

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Linux
Hardware

When the original Raspberry Pi (Rpi) became available in 2012, it was amazing that a Linux computer could fit in the palm of your hand for the low, low price of $35. On the other hand, if you’re a student without a real job, for which these boards were in part intended, $35 can still be a lot of money. To bring this cost down even further, the RPi team announced the RPi Zero in late 2015, which is available for $5, and even came as a “gift” on the cover of that December’s MagPi magazine.

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Devices: Automotive Grade Linux, OSNEXUS, Arbor

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Linux
Hardware

Microsoft Hardware Woes

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Hardware
Microsoft

OBD II connected fleet computer runs Linux

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Linux
Hardware

iWave’s ARM-based “OBD II” car computer features 4G LTE, WiFi, Bluetooth, GPS, an IMU, and an OBD II connector to onboard telematics.

iWave’s “Connected Car Device – OBD II” is an OEM-focused automotive device for fleet management, driving behavior, insurance company monitoring, cab aggregators, remote diagnostics, two-wheeler applications, and “immobilization,” which may refer to breathalyzer connected gear.

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Hardware: Samsung (Tizen Inside), AMD and ARM

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Linux
Hardware
  • Samsung Gear POP – New fitness device on its way as it gets bluetooth certified
  • AMD Confirms Linux Performance Marginality Problem Affecting Some, Doesn't Affect Epyc / TR

    This morning I was on a call with AMD and they are now able to confirm they have reproduced the Ryzen "segmentation fault issue" and are working with affected customers.

    AMD engineers found the problem to be very complex and characterize it as a performance marginality problem exclusive to certain workloads on Linux. The problem may also affect other Unix-like operating systems such as FreeBSD, but testing is ongoing for this complex problem and is not related to the recently talked about FreeBSD guard page issue attributed to Ryzen. AMD's testing of this issue under Windows hasn't uncovered problematic behavior.

  • Chip IP designer ARM becomes “Arm” — or is it arm?

    Chip IP designer ARM Holdings has released a video that rebrands itself as “Arm” and promises to bring “happiness for everyone.”

    Eleven months after UK based semiconductor IP designer ARM Holdings was acquired by Japanese technology giant Softbank Group for about $31 billion, Arm has quietly rebranded itself with a hipper, lower-case “arm” logo. The strapless new look first debuted in a platitude rich Aug. 1 YouTube video (see below) spotted on Underconsideration.com’s BrandNew page. The name change seemed to have been challenged by a bit of indecision, judging by the recent edit history on Arm’s Wikipedia page (see Aug. 7, 2017 screenshot farther below), and the Arm website shows some examples of ARM, Arm, and arm. In an email to LinuxGizmos, Phil Hughes, Arm’s Director of Public Relations, wrote: “basically arm is all lowercase for the logo and when used in text is Arm.”

The Price of Freedom — A Review of the Librem 15 v3

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Hardware
Reviews

Purism is a wild startup located in South San Francisco. Their mission? Providing a superior hardware experience for people who love privacy and software freedom. Purism is building and shipping GNU/Linux laptops, and is interested in developing a phone as well.

The Purism campaign originally launched on CrowdSupply late 2014. Since then, the company has shipped two revisions, and now offers three different models to choose from: an 11-inch convertible tablet, a 13-inch laptop, and a 15-inch powerhouse.

For a few years, I have strongly desired having a quality Linux laptop that has great hardware. So, I’ve taken the plunge on getting the latest 15-inch Librem model from Purism.

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Open Source 3-D Printing and Arduino

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Hardware
OSS
  • UK research team 3D prints open source microscope prototype for only £30

    Just days ago we wrote about an open source 3D printed microscope that could be made for as little as €100 ($118). Now, another project, undertaken by researchers from the University of Bath in the UK, has even higher aspirations than that as it has made a prototype of a 3D printed microscope for only £30 ($40).

  • 3D Robotics open-sources its Solo drone control software
  • Introducing OpenSolo: 3DR Open-Sources Solo Drone Code
  • OpenSolo Initiative – by the ArduPilot Team

    The benefits to existing Solo users are many; the community is now free to maintain and improve upon an established codebase containing many innovative technologies, and developers will be able to “hack” or improve nearly every part of their Solo from now on, including the Controller! The Open Source community in general will also benefit from more generally applicable technologies such as SmartShots and the Artoo controller.

  • Arduino announces developer workshop following Musto ouster

    Arduino opened registration for an Arduino Core Developers Workshop following a shakeup in which controversial CEO Federico Musto left the company.

    Arduino developers who are wondering what the new Arduino will look like after last week’s shakeup can now sign up for an Arduino Core Developers Workshop to be held in Turin, Italy, from Sep. 29 through Oct. 1 (see farther below). Will the company shift entirely to RISC-V? Will Linux remain part off Arduino’s future? And can it compete both with Espressif’s ESP32 and the Raspberry Pi? Hardware aside, what happened to that open source Arduino Foundation? Maybe we’ll even solve the latest Shroud of Turin mystery.

  • Gumstix offers customizable suite of LoRa modules and boards

    Gumstix has added LoRa add-ons to its Geppetto board design service that work with a RisingRF LoRa module, and launched Overo, Pi, and Arduino LoRa boards.

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Big Changes in Arduino and News About Open Source 3-D Printing

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Hardware
  • Federico Musto is out as Arduino CEO

    Last week Arduino AG, the holding company for the open source Arduino project, announced that CEO Federico Musto stepped down, to be replaced with Massimo Banzi as new Chairman and CTO of Arduino and Dr. Fabio Violante as CEO.

    The move comes after the maker community found troubling discrepancies in Musto’s educational claims.

  • Inexpensive Robot with Open Source, 3D Printed Components Cracks a Safe in 30 Minutes at Hacker Convention

    While the 3D printed, PIN-protected door lock by HPI looks cool, I’m pretty sure that a determined thief would find a way to get past it. The 3D printed, heavy duty Stealth Key system looks to be much more difficult to get around, but what’s even more high-tech than a lock or a key? A safe. But a team from Colorado-based SparkFun Electronics, an online retail store that sells pieces for electronics projects, recently used an inexpensive, homemade robot, which features some 3D printed components, to crack open a SentrySafe safe in front of hundreds of excited onlookers at a convention for hackers in Las Vegas.

  • Pedro Petit Open Source 3D Printed Robotic Arm (video)

    If you are looking to learn more about robotics you may be interested in a new project which is being posted to the Hackaday website, detailing how to build a 3D printed open source robotic arm complete with built in control panel.

    Watch the demonstration video below to learn more about the Pedro Petit open source DIY robotic arm which is being created by Hackaday user saandial.

Graphics: ATI/AMD, Radeon, Vega

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware
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10 Best Open Source Forum Software for Linux

A forum is a discussion platform where related ideas and views on a particular issue can be exchanged. You can setup a forum for your site or blog, where your team, customers, fans, patrons, audience, users, advocates, supporters, or friends can hold public or private discussions, as a whole or in smaller groups. If you are planning to launch a forum, and you can’t build your own software from scratch, you can opt for any of the existing forum applications out there. Some forum applications allow you to setup only a single discussion site on a single installation, while others support multiple-forums for a single installation instance. In this article, we will review 10 best open source forum software for Linux systems. By the end of this article, you will know exactly which open source forum software best suites your needs. Read more

(K)Ubuntu: Playing' Tennis and Dropping 32-bit

  • Tennibot is a really cool Ubuntu Linux-powered tennis ball collecting robot
    Linux isn't just a hobby --  the kernel largely powers the web, for instance. Not only is Linux on many web servers, but it is also found on the most popular consumer operating system in the world -- Android. Why is this? Well, the open source kernel scales very well, making it ideal for many projects. True, Linux's share of the desktop is still minuscule, but sometimes slow and steady wins the race -- watch out, Windows! A good example of Linux's scalability is a new robot powered by Linux which was recently featured on the official Ubuntu Blog. Called "Tennibot," the Ubuntu-powered bot seeks out and collects tennis balls. Not only does it offer convenience, but it can save the buyer a lot of money too -- potentially thousands of dollars per year as this calculator shows. So yeah, a not world-changing product, but still very neat nonetheless. In fact, it highlights that Linux isn't just behind boring nerdy stuff, but fun things too.
  • Kubuntu Drops 32-bit Install Images
    If you were planning to grab a Kubuntu 18.10 32-bit download this October you will want to look away now. Kubuntu has confirmed plans to join the rest of the Ubuntu flavour family and drop 32-bit installer images going forward. This means there will be no 32-bit Kubuntu 18.10 disc image available to download later this year.

Suitcase Computer Reborn with Raspberry Pi Inside

Fun fact, the Osborne 1 debuted with a price tag equivalent to about $5,000 in today’s value. With a gigantic 9″ screen and twin floppy drives (for making mix tapes, right?) the real miracle of the machine was its portability, something unheard of at the time. The retrocomputing trend is to lovingly and carefully restore these old machines to their former glory, regardless of how clunky or underpowered they are by modern standards. But sometimes they can’t be saved yet it’s still possible to gut and rebuild the machine with modern hardware, like with this Raspberry Pi used to revive an Osborne 1. Purists will turn their nose up at this one, and we admit that this one feels a little like “restoring” radios from the 30s by chucking out the original chassis and throwing in a streaming player. But [koff1979] went to a lot of effort to keep the original Osborne look and feel in the final product. We imagine that with the original guts replaced by a Pi and a small LCD display taking the place of the 80 character by 24 line CRT, the machine is less strain on the shoulder when carrying it around. (We hear the original Osborne 1 was portable in the same way that an anvil is technically portable.) The Pi runs an emulator to get the original CP/M experience; it even runs Wordstar. The tricky part about this build was making the original keyboard talk to the Pi, which was accomplished with an Arduino that translates key presses to USB. Read more