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Hardware

Devices: Raspberry Pi, Klashwerks, Volvo/AGL/IVI

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Raspberry Pi gets in touch with touch panels

    The Raspberry Pi 3 and RPi 3 Compute Module are quickly expanding into the industrial touch-panel market. Here’s a guide to six RPi-based contenders.

    In the smart home, voice agents are increasingly replacing the smartphone touchscreen interface as the primary human-machine interface (HMI). Yet, in noisier industrial and retail IoT environments, touchscreens are usually the only choice. The industrial touch-panel computer market has been in full swing for over a decade. Touch-panel systems based on Linux, and to a lesser extent, Android, are gaining share from those that use the still widely used Windows Embedded, and over the past year, several Raspberry Pi based systems have reached market. Here we look at six RPi-based touch-panels.

  • Gesture controlled dashcam and telematics computer has dual HD cameras

    Klashwerks has launched a $299, gesture controlled “Raven” dashcam, security system, navigation tool, and OBD-II telematics reporting device, which runs Android on a Snapdragon 650 and offers front- and cabin-facing HD cameras.

    Klashwerks’ Android-based Raven dashcam and automotive computer was a hit on Indiegogo and won a CES Innovation Award. Now it’s available publicly for $299.

  • Volvo runs with Android for Intel IVI, Linux will dominate

    Volvo’s decision to pick Intel’s Atom automotive system on chip (SoC) to run In Vehicle Infotainment (IVI) for its new XC40 SUV highlights the intensifying competition among chip makers in this fast-growing sphere. The decision to base the system on Android also illuminates the evolving OS scene for cars, with Linux the primary alternative in its AGL (Automotive Grade Linux) variant.

Devices: AsteroidOS, Android and More

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • AsteroidOS 1.0 Released, Net Neutrality Update, Qt 3D Studio 2.0 Beta Now Available and More

    AsteroidOS 1.0 is now available. Released yesterday, the open-source operating system for smartwatches is finally available after four years in the works. As posted on the AsteroidOS website, "AsteroidOS is built on standard Linux technologies including OpenEmbedded, opkg, Wayland, Qt5, systemd, BlueZ, and PulseAudio. This makes it the ideal platform to build any sort of wearable project you can imagine. Do you want to run Docker on your watch? AsteroidOS can do it. Do you want to run Quake on your watch? AsteroidOS can do that too. The sky is really the limit! Our community welcomes anyone interested in playing with a smartwatch project."

  • Meet AsteroidOS – A potential replacement for Wear OS
  • Logic Supply embedded PCs now available with pre-loaded AWS Greengrass

    Logic Supply is now offering pre-loaded AWS Greengrass software for autonomous edge processing linked to the AWS IoT platform on two of its Linux-based systems: its recent Apollo Lake based CL200 mini-PC and its Kaby Lake enabled MC850 embedded PC.

    Logic Supply announced it has joined Amazon Web Services’ AWS Partner Network (APN), and is certified to offer the Linux-driven AWS Greengrass software for localized edge computing. The first two certified systems are the recent Intel Apollo Lake based CL200 Edge Device mini-PC and last year’s high-end MC850 embedded computer running Kaby Lake or Skylake CPUs.

  • New Cherry Trail Pico-ITX SBC also available in 7- and 10-inch touch-panels

    Estone Technology (AKA Habey) has launched a Linux-friendly “EMB-2610” Pico-ITX SBC built on an Atom x5-Z8350 with WiFi, BT, and optional PoE, and also introduced 7- and 10-inch touch-panel PCs built on it.

    Over the last decade, Toledo, Ohio based Estone Technology has sold products under either the Estone or Habey label. It’s now integrating the operations and websites under the Estone brand. The product page for the new EMB-2610 Pico-ITX SBC, for example, points to a Habey EMB-2610 datasheet. The EMB-2610 also powers new 7-inch PPC-6607 and 10.1-inch PPC-6610 touch-panel PCs (see farther below).

  • OnePlus 6 Launched; Features A 6.28-inch Screen With Notch And Full Glass Body

    The highly-awaited OnePlus 6 has been launched by the Chinese company OnePlus. Latest of the segment, OnePlus 6 features a 6.28-inch Optic AMOLED display, a notorious notch and carries the price tag of $529 for the starting variant.

    The phone can be availed in three colors namely Mirror Black, Midnight Black and the limited edition Silk White. Under the hood, you will find the Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 along with two options of RAM (6GB and 8GB).

  • How Android P’s Gesture Navigation Works

Talos II Lite

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Raptor Launching Talos II Lite POWER9 Computer System At A Lower Cost

    For those that have been interested in the Talos II POWER-based system that is fully open-source down to the firmware but have been put off by its cost, Raptor Computer Systems today announced the Talos II Lite that is a slightly cut-down version of the Talos II Workstation.

    The Talos II Lite is still a very competent beast of a system and features a single POWER9 CPU socket, EATX chassis, 500W ATX power supply, and is sold as a barebones package. The Talos II Lite motherboard supports up to the 22-core POWER9 CPU, eight DDR4 ECC RAM slots, one PCI Express 4.0 x16 slot, one PCI Express 4.0 x8 slot, dual Gigabit Ethernet, four USB 3.0 ports, and one USB 2.0 port.

  • A little Talos of your very own

    Overall, that $3300 really does translate into greatly improved expandability in addition to the beefier power supplies, and thus it was never really an option for my needs personally. Maybe my mini:Quad analogy wasn't so off base. But if you want to join the POWER9 revolution on a budget and give Chipzilla the finger, as all right-thinking nerds should, you've now got an option that only requires passing a kidneystone of just half the size or less. It ships starting in July.

Gadgets With Linux or Modding

Filed under
Hardware
Gadgets
  • Open-source WearOS alternative “AsteroidOS” now available for several smartwatches
  • AsteroidOS 1.0 released: Open source smartwatch operating system (for Wear OS devices)
  • AsteroidOS 1.0, an open source smartwatch OS, released for certain Android Wear watches
  • Building a DIY amp kit that's great for vinyl records

    About a week after I wrapped up my last article where I talked about needing another stage of amplification to take advantage of my new 0.4mV phono cartridge, all the remaining bits and pieces I had ordered online to build the Muffsy phono head amplifier kit arrived. I had the amplifier kit, the power supply kit, the back-panel kit (all from Muffsy), the case (from a very efficient supplier in China), the temperature-controlled soldering station, and the wall wart (from a very efficient supplier in California).

    I watched the entertaining "how to solder" videos linked on Muffsy's site and realized I needed a few more things—like the thin solder mentioned on those videos and some solder wick. So, on an unusually bright and sunny Saturday morning, I visited a local electronics supply store, picked up the last items, and started building.

    [...]

    I contacted "the person behind Muffsy," Håvard Skrodahl, with some questions. He responded very quickly, and we ended up having a most delightful conversation. Moreover, it turns out Håvard is a system administrator and does this "kit thing" as a side gig. We discussed (or maybe lamented) that "back in the good old days" it was possible to buy all sorts of electronics kits, from Heathkit, Dynaco, David Hafler, and others. Today, there are still audio kits available, but it seems to be of lesser interest. Too bad! I am very grateful to Håvard for open sourcing so much of his materials.

  • UP Core SBC begins shipments

    Aaeon has begun shipping its community-backed “UP Core” SBC starting at $99, featuring a quad-core Atom x5-Z8350, up to 4GB RAM and 64GB eMMC, plus WiFi, BT, HDMI, USB 3.0, and RPi HAT compatibility.

    Aaeon has achieved volume production for its UP Core SBC, a smaller (66 x 56.5mm) version of the UP board. The UP Core supports the same OSes as the UP — Android 6.0, Ubuntu, Ubilinux, and Yocto based Linux, as well as Windows 10 and Windows IoT Core — running on the same quad-core, up to 1.84GHz Intel Atom x5-Z8350 from the Cherry Trail family.

Open Hardware: RISC-V and 3-D Printing

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Develop your Linux apps on this RISC-V board

    A funny thing happened on the way to a writing up this hardware announcement. Going through all the cool features (which I’ll get to in a minute), I realized that this announcement is really about the software, whether that was the intention or not.

  • RISC-V Benchmarks Of SiFive's HiFive Unleashed Begin Appearing

    Over the past week, benchmarks of this first RISC-V development board have begun appearing on OpenBenchmarking.org by the Phoronix Test Suite. Here are some of those initial benchmark numbers.

    SiFive's HiFive Unleashed as a reminder is the first RISC-V Linux development board and uses the Freedom U540 SoC. SiFive claims this is the "world's fastest RISC-V processor" and is in a 4+1 multi-core design with clock speeds up to 1.5GHz, features a 2MB L2 cache, Gigabit Ethernet, 64-bit DDR4 with ECCm and is manufactured on a 28nm process. The HiFive Unleashed development board has 8GB of DDR4, 32MB quad SPI flash, microSD card for storage, and more via SiFive.com.

  • paradiddle, an open-source 3D-printed drumming prosthesis by dominic siguang ma

    ‘paradiddle’, an essential rudiment of drum beats, is an open-source 3D-printed upper-extremity prosthesis designed specifically for amputee drummer by young china-born and USA-based designer dominic siguang ma. to develop unique features that would allow the drummer to play more intuitively and comfortably, the designer worked with renowned amputee drummer greg anton.

Devices: Advantech, Alphamax, EVOC

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Advantech continues its Arm push with QuadMax based Qseven module

    Advantech’s “ROM-7720” Qseven module runs Linux or Android on a hexa-core i.MX8 QuadMax with 4K, USB 3.0, PCIe, and SATA. The company is also partnering with Timesys on security services for its Arm-based boards and is co-hosting a Timesys webinar on the topic.

    We missed Advantech’s announcement about the NXP i.MX8 QuadMax based ROM-7720 module in the flurry of embedded news coming out of Embedded World show in late February. Full specs have now been posted for the 70 x 70mm Qseven 2.1 form-factor module, which is expected to ship in Q4. In related news, Timesys recently announced it is partnering with Advantech on security solutions for its Arm-based boards, and will host a webinar series on the topic starting May 17 (see farther below).

  • FPGA-driven Raspberry Pi add-on enables overlays on encrypted video

    Alphamax is crowdfunding an open source “NeTV2” video development add-on board for the Raspberry Pi with an Artix-7 FPGA, 4x PCIe lanes, 2x HDMI inputs, 2x HDMI outputs, and Python programming for overlaying content on encrypted video signals.

    Back in 2016, hardware hacker Bunnie Huang joined with the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) to sue the U.S. government to overturn the “onerous provisions” of Section 1201 of the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). The provisions restrict access to copyrighted material “even where people want to make noninfringing fair uses of the materials they are accessing,” according to the EFF.

  • 15-inch touch-panel PC runs on Skylake or Bay Trail

    EVOC’s “PPC-1561” is a 15.6-inch, HD-ready, capacitive touch-panel computer with a 7th Gen “Skylake-U” or Bay Trail Celeron CPU, IP65 protection, SATA, mini-PCIe, and up to 4x GbE, 6x COM, and 6x USB ports.

Linux-Friendly Arduino Simplifies IoT Development

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Arduino’s support for Linux IoT devices and single-board computers (SBCs) announced at the Embedded Linux Conference+Open IoT Summit NA in March cemented Arduino’s focus on cloud-connected IoT development, extending its reach into edge computing. This move was likely driven by multiple factors — increased complexity of IoT solutions and, secondarily, by more interest in Arduino boards running Linux.

In a “blending” of development communities for the masses — Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and BeagleBone — Arduino’s support for Linux-based boards lowers the barrier of development for IoT devices by combining Arduino’s sensor and actuator nodes with higher processor-powered boards like Raspberry Pi and BeagleBone. Top this with a user-friendly web wizard to connect the Linux boards via the cloud and it simplifies the entire process.

The expanded support for more architectures by the cloud-connected Arduino Create web platform is an inevitable and natural evolution of Arduino’s mission that was born out of a thought to simplify complex technologies with easy-to-use and open-source software, enabling anybody to innovate by making complex technologies simple to use.

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Linux-based networking SBC features five GbE ports and optional SFP

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Gateworks has launched a rugged, headless “Newport GW6400” SBC that runs Linux on a dual- or quad-core Cavium OcteonTX with 3x mini-PCIe, 2x USB 3.0, 5x GbE ports (2x with PoE) and optional SFP.

Last November, Gateworks announced a new product family of rugged Newport SBCs that run OpenWrt or Ubuntu on Cavium’s dual or quad-core ARMv8.1 Octeon TX networking SoCs. The debut model was a 105 x 100mm GW6300 SBC. Now, Gateworks has followed up with the promised high-end, 140 x 100mm Newport GW6400 model, which has 5x Gigabit Ethernet ports instead of 3x on the GW6300. Later this year we’ll see a GW6100 with a single gigabit port and a GW6200 with 2x GbE.

Read more

Devices: Green Hills Software 'Spam', Librem 5 Design, VIA Kit, Android P

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Choosing between Embedded Linux or a proprietary real-time operating system [Ed: "Author Bio: Marcus Nissemark is a Field Applications Engineer at Green Hills Software" - so it's not really an article or a comparison but a commercial for his employer's proprietary software]
  • Librem 5 design report #5

    Hello everyone! A lot has happened behind the scenes since my last design report. Until now, I have been reporting on our design work mainly on the software front, but our effort is obviously not limited to that. The experience that people can have with their physical device is also very important. So in this post I will summarize some recent design decisions we have made both on the software side and the hardware product “experience” design.

  • VIA Joins In The AI Race, Linux/Android Support For Their New Developer Kit

    It's been a while since last seeing any interesting products out of VIA with having been focusing on digital signage solutions and fabricating some basic ARM boards. The company has been exploring deep learning and AI and today announced the VIA Edge AI Developer Kit.

    The VIA Edge AI Developer Kit isn't powered by any of their own ARM SoCs (or VIA-owned WonderMedia) or even VIA/Zhaoxin x86 processors, but rather have tapped Qualcomm with their Snapdragon 820E platform. 

    [...]

    Those interested in learning more about this Linux/Android-powered Edge AI Developer Kit can do so at ViaTech.com. The complete kit will set you back $629 while just the module and carrier board are $569 USD and if you want a 10.1-inch MIPI LCD touch panel that is an additional $179.

  • The Best New Features in Android P, Available Now in Beta
  • Android P Tackles Phone Addiction, Distraction

    Google on Tuesday revealed some major new features in the next version of its Android operating system for mobile devices.

    Now in public beta, the OS known as "Android P" includes features designed to address growing concerns about phone addiction and distraction.

    For example, a dashboard will show users how often, when and for how long they use each application on their phone. What's more, they can set time limits on usage.

'Open' Photography and Hardware (RISC-V)

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Building a freedom-based photography community

    Several years ago, Pat David, an engineer, a photographer, and a member of the GIMP team, realized there was no central place for people interested in photography to learn about free and open source creative software and methods. He was also unhappy to see that most of the open source photography tutorials didn't measure up to his quality standards.

    Thus was born Pixls.us, a site "to provide tutorials, workflows, and a showcase for high-quality photography using nothing but free software." Pat and Pixls.us also advocate for releasing creative content under open licenses for others to use and reuse.

  • Microsemi and SiFive Launch HiFive Unleashed Expansion Board, Enabling Linux Software and Firmware Developers to Build RISC-V PCs for the First Time

    Microsemi Corporation (Nasdaq: MSCC), a leading provider of semiconductor solutions differentiated by power, security, reliability and performance, today announced the launch of the HiFive Unleashed Expansion Board, its latest collaboration with SiFive, the first fabless provider of customized, open-source-enabled semiconductors. Leveraging the two companies' strategic relationship as part of Microsemi's Mi-V™ RISC-V ecosystem, the new expansion board broadens the capabilities of SiFive's HiFive Unleashed RISC-V development board, further enabling software and firmware engineers to write Linux-based applications targeting a 1GhZ+ RISC-V 64 bit central processing unit (CPU).

  • RISC-V workshop

    I’m giving a talk tomorrow afternoon about Fedora on RISC-V.

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More in Tux Machines

Canonical/Ubuntu Watching You

  • Two-thirds of Ubuntu users are happy to give up data on their PC
    As announced back at the start of the year, Canonical made the decision that Ubuntu would collect data on its user base – and now the initial results of those statistics have been published by the firm, including the headline fact that 67% of users were happy to provide details of their PC (and other bits and pieces). So, this scheme that has been unfavorably compared to Microsoft’s collection of telemetry data in Windows 10, which has long been a point of controversy. However, it appears that the majority of folks are happy to give up their data to the company providing their Linux distribution, and don’t seem perturbed by this prospect.
  • Ubuntu reports 67% of users opt in to on-by-default PC specs slurp [Ed: 33% of Ubuntu users say to Canonical "don't spy on me" and Canonical then counts them, which means that Canonical collects data on them, too]
    However just 33 per cent of the undisclosed number of users Canonical’s analysed didn’t opt in to the slurpage. Which is where things get a little bit weird, because Canonical’s post reports an “Opt In rate”. Yet the data slurpage is selected by default: there’s an active opt out but a passive opt in.
  • The Average Ubuntu Install Takes 18 Minutes (And Other Stats)
    Did you know that the average Ubuntu install takes just 18 minutes? That’s one of several nuggets of information Canonical has collected (and now revealed) thanks to the new “Ubuntu Report” tool included in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS. This tool, when given permission to, collects non-identifiable system data about new Ubuntu installs and upgrades and ferries it back to Canonical for analysis.

Linux Foundation's TODO and New Chinese Ties

  • The Linux Foundation and TODO Group Release Chinese Versions of Open Source Guides for the Enterprise
    -The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, has released Chinese translations of 10 Open Source Guides for the Enterprise, created to help executives, open source program managers, developers, attorneys and decision makers learn how to best leverage open source.
  • Tencent joins the Linux Foundation as a platinum member
    Chinese tech giant Tencent has announced it’s joined the Linux Foundation as a platinum member. Tencent is one of a few companies to offer the highest level of support to the Linux Foundation. Other tech companies in this stable include IBM, Microsoft, and Intel, as well as fellow Chinese titan Huawei. As part of the deal, Tencent will take a chair on the Foundation’s board of directors. It has also promised to offer “further support and resources” to the Foundation’s efforts. So far, this has taken the form of Tencent donating several pieces of its software.
  • Tencent becomes a Linux Foundation platinum member to increase its focus on open source
    Tencent, the $500-billion Chinese internet giant, is increasing its focus on open source after it became a platinum member of the Linux Foundation. The company has long been associated with the foundation and Linux generally, it is a founding member of the Linux Foundation’s deep learning program that launched earlier this year, and now as a platinum member (the highest tier) it will take a board of directors seat and work more closely with the organization. That works two ways, with Tencent pledging to offer “further support and resources” to foundation projects and communities, while the Chinese firm itself will also tap into the foundation’s expertise and experience.
  • Tencent Supports Open Source Community With Linux Foundation Platinum Membership
    LinuxCon China -- The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, announces Tencent has become the latest Platinum member of the foundation. Tencent is a leading provider of Internet value added services in China, offering some of China's most popular websites, apps and services including QQ, Qzone, Tencent Cloud and Weixin/WeChat.
  • TARS and TSeer Form Open Source Project Communities Under The Linux Foundation to Expand Adoption and Pace of Development
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced at LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen China in Beijing that TARS, a remote procedure call (RPC) framework, and TSeer, a high availability service discovery, registration and fault tolerance framework, have become Linux Foundation projects. Both projects were initially developed by leading Chinese technology company, Tencent, which open sourced the projects last year. This follows the announcement of Tencent becoming a Platinum member of The Linux Foundation, and reflects the foundation’s growing collaboration with the Chinese open source community.
  • Tencent Becomes Latest Platinum Member of Linux Foundation
    Chinese behemoth looking to cultivate open source ties The Linux Foundation has announced that Tencent has become the latest member to obtain platinum membership. The non-profit American tech company, which is funded by membership payments, uses the funding for sustainable open source projects. Within the foundation, there are three membership tiers, starting from silver to gold, all the way up to platinum where members have to pay $500,000 a year (approx. £377,643) for that category.
  • Tencent Joins The Linux Foundation, Open-Sources Projects
    China's Tencent holding conglomerate that backs a variety of Internet services/products is the latest platinum member of the Linux Foundation.

Events: DebCamp, openSUSE Conference, OSSummit Japan 2018

  • Yes! I am going to...
    Of course, DebCamp is not a vacation, so we expect people that take part of DebCamp to have at least a rough sketch of activities. There are many, many things I want to tackle, and experience shows there's only time for a fraction of what's planned.
  • Dates, Location set for openSUSE Conference 2019
    The openSUSE Project is pleased to announce the location and dates for the 2019 openSUSE Conference. The openSUSE Conference 2019 will return to the Z-Bau in Nuremberg, Germany, and be Friday, May 24, through Sunday, May 26. Planning for the 2019 conference will begin this summer and community members are encouraged to take part in the planning of the conference through the organizing team. The openSUSE Board proposed the idea of having organizing team for openSUSE Conferences last month at oSC18. An email about the organizing team was sent out to the openSUSE-Project mailing list.
  • OSSummit Japan 2018
    Some Debian developers (Jose from Microsoft and Michael from credativ) gave a talk during this event.

Games: Warhammer, Steam, OpenSAGE and Wine