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Hardware

Nano-ITX dev kit shows off Samsung Exynos 8895

Filed under
Android
Linux
Hardware

Howchip has launched a sandwich-style, Nano-ITX form factor “ExSOM-8895 DVK” that runs Android 7.0 and Linux 4.4.13 on Samsung’s octa-core Exynos 8895 SoC with 4GB DDR4, dual UFS 2.1 storage interfaces, and MIPI-DSI and -CSI.

A Chinese firm called Howchip, owned by Unibest, has launched an Android Nougat Development Platform. The ExSOM-8895 DVK showcases Samsung’s Exynos 8895, an octa-core SoC that is available on EMEA-bound versions models of the primarily Snapdragon 835 based Galaxy S8 phone. The 120 x 120mm Nano-ITX form-factor board integrates an unnamed 70 x 50mm compute module that houses the Exynos 8895 and runs Android 7.0 with Linux kernel 4.4.13.

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Touch-enabled version of Raspberry Pi based Kano kit arrives

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OS
Hardware

Kano has launched a $280 “Computer Kit Touch” version of its Raspberry Pi based computing education kit with an RPi 3B, a 10.1-inch HD touchscreen, plus a keyboard, speaker, mic, and 3000mAh battery.

Kano’s Raspberry Pi Model B based Kano kit computing education platform and Raspberry Pi 3 Model B based Kano Computer Kit were huge hits in both the educational and consumer markets. The company has now returned with a Computer Kit Touch version, which similarly aims to teach kids age 6 to 13 to program using visual tools and its Debian-based Kano OS.

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Coreboot Improvements For FU540 Land Following SiFive's Open-Source Boot Code

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Hardware

Last week SiFive published their HiFive Unleashed open-source boot-loader code for this first RISC-V SoC on their Linux-friendly development board. This code being open-sourced has already helped improve the support for the FU540 SoC within Coreboot.

The code open-sourced last week by SiFive allows for a fully open-source boot process after this first RISC-V developer board received some criticism for some of its initialization code being closed-source, namely around the SDRAM start-up code.

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Also: Intel Releases New BSD-Licensed Open-Source Firmware Implementation

ACEINNA Launches the First Open Source IMU Development Kit for Drones, Robots and AGVs

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Hardware
OSS
  • ACEINNA Launches the First Open Source IMU Development Kit for Drones, Robots and AGVs

    ACEINNA Integrated Hardware and Software Can Slash Development Time and Costs by Up to 80%

  • Open source IMU dev kit slashes design costs

    The OpenIMU is what Aceinna presents as the first professionally supported, open-source GPS/GNSS-aided inertial navigation software stack for low-cost precise navigation applications.

  • Open-source software stack for INS/GPS algorithm development

    Whether you are developing autonomously guided vehicles for industrial applications, autonomous cars, factory or industrial robots, drones, ROVs, any kind of smart machine which needs to move – fast or slow, on land, in the air, or in water, integrating an IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit) based sensor network will greatly improve its navigation and self-location capabilities.

    “Our breakthrough open-source Software for INS/GPS algorithm development is the first professional grade open-source navigation stack running on a low-cost IMU,” says Mike Horton, CTO of ACEINNA. “Not only will this kit save developers time and money, it is simple to use and does not require a PhD.”

Refund offered for Raspberry Pi PoE HAT due to power issues

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Hardware

With several users reporting problems with the recently released Raspberry Pi Power-over-Ethernet HAT, the Raspberry Pi Foundation is offering to refund customers that have purchased the faulty board.

In the days since its release in late August, users had been reporting limitations in the power supplied by the Raspberry Pi PoE HAT. The HAT is an add-on to the popular Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ SBC. Over the intervening weeks, engineers at the Raspberry Raspberry Pi Foundation have been wrestling to figure out the nature of the problem. And interesting play-by-play can be followed on the Raspberry Pi forums.

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RK3399 based 96Boards SBC starts at $99

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Vamrs has begun shipping the “Rock960” — the first 96Boards SBC based on the hexa-core Rockchip RK3399. The community-backed SBC sells for $99 (2GB/16GB) or $139 (4GB/32GB).

Shortly before Shenzhen-based Vamrs Limited launched a Rockchip RK3399 Sapphire SBC in Nov. 2017, the company announced a similarly open-spec Rock960 SBC that uses the same Rockchip RK3399 SoC, but instead adopts the smaller, 85 x 55mm 96Boards CE form factor. The Rock960 was showcased in March along with other AI-enabled boards as part of Linaro’s 96Boards.ai initiative announcement.

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Also: Bixel, An Open Source 16×16 Interactive LED Array

AMD's Latest Linux and Free Software Work

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • AMD Sends Out Initial Open-Source Linux Graphics Support For "Picasso" APUs

    Adding to the exciting week for AMD open-source Linux graphics is that in addition to the long-awaited patch update for FreeSync/Adaptive-Sync/VRR, patches for the Linux kernel were sent out prepping the graphics upbringing for the unreleased "Picasso" APUs.

    Picasso APUs are rumored to be similar to Raven Ridge APUs and would be for the AM4 socket. Picasso might launch in Q4 but intended as a 2019 platform for AM4 desktops as well as a version for notebooks. It's not expected that Picasso will be too much greater than the current Raven Ridge parts.

  • AMD's Marek Olšák Is Dominating Mesa Open-Source GPU Driver Development This Year

    With Q3 coming towards an end, here is a fresh look at the Mesa Git development trends for the year-to-date. Mesa on a commit basis is significantly lower than in previous years, but there is a new top contributor to Mesa.

    Mesa as of today is made up of 6,101 files that comprise of 2,492,887 lines of code. Yep, soon it will break 2.5 million lines. There have been 104,754 commits to Mesa from roughly 900 authors.

  • AMD Lands Mostly Fixes In Latest Batch Of AMDVLK/XGL/PAL Code Updates

    The AMD developers maintaining their "AMDVLK" Vulkan driver have pushed out their latest batch of code comprising this driver including the PAL abstraction layer, XGL Vulkan bits, and LLPC LLVM-based compiler pipeline.

So-called 'IoT' with GNU/Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • How to turn on an LED with Fedora IoT

    Do you enjoy running Fedora, containers, and have a Raspberry Pi? What about using all three together to play with LEDs? This article introduces Fedora IoT and shows you how to install a preview image on a Raspberry Pi. You’ll also learn how to interact with GPIO in order to light up an LED.

  • Nucleo boards takes ST's 8-bit MCUs to open-source IoT projects

    STMicroelectronics has introduced two STM8 Nucleo development boards, letting the 8-bit world experience the ease of access and extensibility already proven with the STM32 Nucleo range.

    Leveraging the formula that has kickstarted countless STM32 embedded projects, the STM8 Nucleo boards give full access to all STM8 MCU I/Os through ST morpho headers, and contain Arduino Uno connectors that simplify functional expansion by accessing the vast ecosystem of open-source Arduino-compatible shields.

Meet TUXEDO Nano V8: A Power-packed Linux Mini PC

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

TUXEDO Computers is known for building custom PCs or notebooks. They focus on Linux-powered systems while making sure that the hardware configuration they put together is completely compatible with Linux distributions.

Recently, they pulled the curtains off a new product and revealed the TUXEDO Nano – which is a Linux-based mini PC (just about the size of a Rabbit or even smaller).

Fret not, it is only smaller in the dimensions you measure with, you won’t be disappointed by the computing power it has to offer.

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AMD and Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware
  • AMD's GPUOpen Vulkan Memory Allocator 2.1 Released

    AMD's GPUOpen group has announced a new version of their open-source Vulkan Memory Allocator project that seeks to make it easier to deal with memory allocation and management when using this graphics API.

  • AMD Nearing Full OpenCL 2.0 Support With ROCm 2.0 Compute Stack

    AMD's fully open-source GPU compute stack in the form of ROCm "Radeon Open Compute" is nearing its next milestone with OpenCL 2.0 compliance.

    While we have been looking forward to ROCm 1.9 as the next feature release for this Linux OpenCL/GPGPU stack with OpenCL 1.2 officially plus portions of OpenCL 2.0+, the ROCm 2.0 release is where they are squaring up for complete OpenCL 2.0 support.

  • AMD Officially Announces The Ryzen 3 2300X & Ryzen 5 2500X

    Following weeks of leaks about these new processors targeting OEMs and system integrators, AMD today officially announced the Ryzen 3 2300X and Ryzen 5 2500X processors.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming/Development: uTidylib, From Python to Rust, Programming Experiences and Go Tips

  • uTidylib 0.4
    Two years ago, I've taken over uTidylib maintainership. Two years has passed without any bigger contribution, but today there is a new version with support for recent html-tidy and Python 3.
  • Rewrote summain from Python to Rust
    I've been learning Rust lately. As part of that, I rewrote my summain program from Python to Rust (see summainrs). It's not quite a 1:1 rewrite: the Python version outputs RFC822-style records, the Rust one uses YAML. The Rust version is my first attempt at using multithreading, something I never added to the Python version.
  • Which programming language for work? For the weekend?
    Our writer community grows each month as new, interesting folks write for us and join in on the fun of sharing their expertise and experiences in open source technology. So, it's no surprise that they are brimming with fascinating information. It's just asking the right question to release it. Recently, I asked: What programming languages do you use at work, and which ones do you use on the weekend?
  • Go command and packages cheat sheet
    Of the many things the go executable can do, most people know only go run and go build. And, of the many packages in the standard Go library, most people know only the fmt package. This cheat sheet will list many uses of the go executable and the most important packages in the Go standard library.

IPFire 2.21 - Core Update 124 released

This is the official release announcement for IPFire 2.21 – Core Update 124. It brings new features and immensely improves security and performance of the whole system. Read more

Mozilla: Featured Extensions Advisory Board, Extended Mind, Firefox Deprecating TLS 1.0 and TLS 1.1 Support, Google's Lies, Mozilla Reps

  • Apply to Join the Featured Extensions Advisory Board
    Do you love extensions? Do you have a keen sense of what makes a great extension? Want to help users discover extensions that will improve how they experience the web? If so, please consider applying to join our Featured Extensions Community Board! Board members nominate and select new featured extensions each month to help millions of users find top-quality extensions to customize their Firefox browsers. Click here to learn more about the duties of the Featured Extension Advisory Board. The current board is currently wrapping up their six-month tour of duty and we are now assembling a new board of talented contributors for the months January – June, 2019. Extension developers, designers, advocates, and fans are all invited to apply to join the board. Priority will be given to applicants who have not served on the board before, followed by those from previous boards, and finally from the outgoing board.
  • Mozilla VR Blog: How XR Environments Shape User Behavior
    In previous research, The Extended Mind has documented how a 3D space automatically signals to people the rules of behavior. One of the key findings of that research is that when there is synchrony in the design of a space, it helps communicate behavioral norms to visitors. That means that when there is complementarity among content, affordances, and avatars, it helps people learn how to act. One example would be creating a gym environment (content), with weights (affordances), but only letting avatars dress in tuxedos and evening gowns. The contraction of people’s appearances could demotivate weight-lifting (the desired behavior). This article shares learnings from the Hubs by Mozilla user research on how the different locations that they visited impacted participant’s behavior. Briefly, the researchers observed five pairs of participants in multiple 3D environments and watched as they navigated new ways of interacting with one another. In this particular study, participants visited a medieval fantasy world, a meeting room, an atrium, and a rooftop bunker.
  • Removing Old Versions of TLS
    In March of 2020, Firefox will disable support for TLS 1.0 and TLS 1.1. On the Internet, 20 years is an eternity. TLS 1.0 will be 20 years old in January 2019. In that time, TLS has protected billions – and probably trillions – of connections from eavesdropping and attack. In that time, we have collectively learned a lot about what it takes to design and build a security protocol. Though we are not aware of specific problems with TLS 1.0 that require immediate action, several aspects of the design are neither as strong or as robust as we would like given the nature of the Internet today. Most importantly, TLS 1.0 does not support modern cryptographic algorithms.
  • Wladimir Palant: So Google is now claiming: "no one (including Google) can access your data"
    A few days ago Google announced ensuring privacy for your Android data backups. The essence is that your lockscreen PIN/pattern/passcode is used to encrypt your data and nobody should be able to decrypt it without knowing that passcode. Hey, that’s including Google themselves! Sounds good? Past experience indicates that such claims should not always be taken at face value. And in fact, this story raises some red flags for me. The trouble is, whatever you use on your phone’s lockscreen is likely not very secure. It doesn’t have to be, because the phone will lock up after a bunch of failed attempts. So everybody goes with a passcode that is easy to type but probably not too hard to guess. Can you derive an encryption key from that passcode? Sure! Will this encryption be unbreakable? Most definitely not. With passwords being that simple, anybody getting their hands on encrypted data will be able to guess the password and decrypt the data within a very short time. That will even be the case for a well-chosen key derivation algorithm (and we don’t know yet which algorithm Google chose to use here).
  • Rabimba: Voting impartially for fun and profit a.k.a Mozilla Reps Council Voting
    I am part of a program called Mozilla Reps. Though I am involved as a volunteer contributor with Mozilla for quite some time now, I am relatively new to the Mozilla Reps program and hardly know anything about the program apart from my scope of work in it. Apparently, this is the Election time for voting the nominated candidates for the Council who will spearhead the program for the next session. Since I am new to the program reading about everyone's election campaign and hearing about what they will do for the program was not giving me any clear motivation to vote for anyone specific. Though this wasn't anything super important, I still thought since I have a bit of time in my hand why not do something interesting about it.

Xfce Screensaver 0.1.0 Released

  • Xfce Screensaver 0.1.0 Released
    I am pleased to announce the release of Xfce Screensaver (xfce4-screensaver) 0.1.0! This is an early release targeted to testers and translators. Bugs and patches welcome!
  • Xfce4-Screensaver Has Its First Release - Fork Of MATE Screensaver, Forked From GNOME
    As a new alternative over XScreenSaver or using other desktop environments' screensaver functionality, xfce4-screensaver has out its first release albeit of alpha quality. The xfce4-screensaver project made its preliminary (v0.1.0) release today that is described of alpha quality intended for testers and translators. This new screensaver option for Xfce users is forked from the MATE Screensaver code, which in turn was forked from the GNOME Screensaver.