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Hardware

Raspberry Pi: Extending the life of the SD card

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

SD cards are said to have a finite life. If you are planning on running a Raspberry Pi 24x7x365, there are some steps that you can take with GNU/Linux to extend the life of the card: here are some ideas.

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2014: The Year of Free Hardware

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Hardware

Usually, I avoid making predictions. However, increasingly, I believe that the sleeper trend of 2014 will be free-licensed hardware -- and that its availability could transform free and open source software (FOSS) as well as hardware manufacturing.

As 2013 closes, the trend is already well-advanced. Ubuntu Edge's crowdfunding might have failed, but Ubuntu Touch is supposed to have a still-unnamed vendor, while the first Firefox OS phone was released in July, and Jolla released its first phone based on Sailfish OS.

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Coreboot Gets Ported To The Lenovo X230 Ultrabook

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Hardware

Lenovo's X230 is an "ultraportable business laptop" with 12.5-inch display, 2.96lb weight, and other modern features while boasting an Intel Core i5 series processor.

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New Intel Broadwell Backends Land In Mesa

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Some open-source Intel Linux developers have been busy this weekend to ensure the Broadwell open-source driver enablement work will be ready for when the hardware ships in a few months time so it won't be like the poor open-source Kaveri driver.

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The First Totally Open Source Laptop Is Almost Real

Filed under
OS
Hardware

Is your laptop secure? In the age of widespread snooping from the NSA and so many others, do you really know that your machine is safe? Is every part of it steeled against attack from miscreants across the web? Those may seem like questions born from paranoia. But recent revelations from former NSA contractor Edward Snowden have shown us that, in many ways, we’re right to be paranoid.

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Spark.io Hackers Make An Open-Source Nest Thermostat

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Hardware
OSS

Sure it’s not made of metal, nor did it convince Google to give its creators billions of dollars, but dammit if this isn’t a cool hack. The folks at Spark.io, creators of the Spark Core, a unique Wi-Fi development board that allows you to add Wi-Fi controls to Arduino projects, have used their tech to create a Nest-alike with some of the same features as Tony Fadell’s popular wall wart.

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Raspberry Pi hands-on: PiHub and Bluetooth

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

So far I have looked at the Raspberry Pi NOOBS Linux distributions: Raspbian, Arch and Pidora; the XBMC focused Raspbmc and OpenELEC; and the non-Linux RISC OS. Then in the most recent post I discussed the Pi Camera and USB WiFi adapters. Speaking of the camera, there was a very interesting new post on the Raspberry Pi web site about a python interface and a web page for accessing the Pi camera.

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Raspberry Pi: 11 reasons why it's the perfect small server

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Recently I've been experimenting with a Raspberry Pi (revision Cool running different GNU/Linux distributions.

Since the Pi is a basically a mini-computer, I decided to take it for a spin and see what I could throw at it, and I have been pleasantly surprised. In fact, it's been so successful that I've decided to try setting it up as a mini server with various services. In doing so, I've come up with a list of advantages that I feel are very compelling.

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Google, Synnex Partnership: More Chromebooks In Schools

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Hardware

Synnex is set to empower Google Chromebook resellers supporting North America K-12 schools and commercial customers. The strategic Google-Synnex relationship will help resellers to deploy and centrally manage fleets of Chromebooks within schools and vertical market settings. The move comes only a few weeks after the search giant further enhanced its Google Apps partner program for resellers.

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AMD Radeon R9 270 in Fedora 20 experience

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Linux
Hardware

A week ago I’ve bough MSI Radeon R9 270 GAMING 2G. It’s an upper mid-range card and most new games should run on it reasonably well on high details. In Fedora there are two choices – you can either use the default open-source radeonsi driver, or you can install proprietary catalyst driver. I have tried general system functionality and also a lot of games (through Steam) on both drivers.

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More in Tux Machines

And now for some good news... How open source triumphed over Microsoft Office in Italy

Microsoft Office may have a global monopoly, but one Italian region rejected it flat out. But, why? In the stunningly beautiful Italian region of Umbria, you'll feel more at home running open source software, rather than the clunky and expensive Microsoft Office suite. Read more

Red Hat, Chilean government hold talks on open source initiative

The head of Chilean regulator Pedro Huichalaf agreed to pass information regarding the benefits of open source software to the ministerial committee for digital development Read more

IT teams are choosing open source - but not just for the cost savings

IT decision makers are increasingly turning to open source over proprietary software because they believe it offers them better business continuity and control Read more

Patent Troll Kills Open Source Project On Speeding Up The Computation Of Erasure Codes

Via James Bessen, we learn of how a patent trolling operation by StreamScale has resulted in an open source project completely shutting down, despite the fact that the patent in question (US Patent 8,683,296 for an "Accelerated erasure coding system and method") is almost certainly ineligible for patent protection as an abstract idea, following the Supreme Court's Alice ruling and plenty of prior art. Erasure codes are used regularly today in cloud computing data storage and are considered to be rather important. Not surprisingly, companies and lawyers are starting to pop out of the woodwork to claim patents on key pieces. I won't pretend to understand the fundamental details of erasure codes, but the link above provides all the details. It goes through the specific claims in the patents, breaking down what they actually say (basically an erasure code on a computer using SIMD instructions), and how that's clearly an abstract idea and thus not patent-eligible. Read more