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Hardware

Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware
  • AsteroidOS 1.0 Alpha on the Asus Zenwatch 3

    In a previous article, I published a small userspace image and Linux kernel for the Zenwatch 3 that enables root access with SSH over USB on the watch. By now, I reached my initial goal to get AsteroidOS, the alternative Android Wear operating system, running on the Zenwatch 3. Similar to SailfishOS and Ubuntu Touch, AsteroidOS uses the original Android kernel - a patched Linux kernel - with a GNU/Linux userspace that, in turn, also uses some of the original, closed-source Android libraries to access certain hardware like the GPU. As the Android libraries expect a different software ecosystem, e.g., a different C library called bionic, we cannot simply call the Android libraries from within a common GNU/Linux application. Instead, we need an additional software layer that translates between the Android and the common GNU/Linux world. This layer is called libhybris.

  • How Ironic: Harman Kardon’s Microsoft Cortana Speaker Is Powered by Linux

    Harman Kardon, the company recently acquired by Samsung, has developed its very own Cortana speaker, which is very similar to the Amazon Echo but featuring Microsoft’s famous digital assistant.

    And since Cortana is the key feature of this little device, it only makes sense for Harman Kardon to turn to Windows 10 to power the device. And yet, it looks like the so-called Harman Kardon is actually running Linux.

  • MontaVista® Launches Carrier Grade eXpress®(CGX) 2.2 Linux® for 5G and IoT at MWC 2017
  • The Numbers Article for Mobile in 2017 - All the Statistics You Could Ask For

    Mobile is the hottest industry. Banking and payments are rushing to mobile. Governments doing healthcare and education with mobile. Travel from airlines to taxis to trains and busses to hotel bookings is going mobile. Your driver's licence is migrating to the mobile phone as are your keys to your home. And all the other big tech stories from Internet of Things (IoT) to 'Big Data' analytics to Cloud computing - are all dependent on mobile. And next week we have the massive industry event in Barcelona, Mobile World Congress. My brand new TomiAhonen Almanac 2017 is now finished and is released today. So this is the perfect time to do my annual 'State of Mobile' blog of the major statistics. What are the big numbers. Lets start with reach. Yes, mobile is by far the most widely-spread communication technology humankind has ever witnessed.

  • Tizen Store Expands Its Service Coverage to 222 Countries

    The Tizen Store, as the name suggests, is the Tizen Application Store for developers to publish their free and paid for Tizen apps. In April 2015, we saw the store expand it’s coverage to include 182 countries, which was mainly for FREE apps, but we saw this as setting the foundation for providing paid for apps further down the road.

'Opening' Hardware

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Hardware

Recent open source hardware trends, from SBCs to servers

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Linux
Hardware

At ELC Europe, Intel MinnowBoard SBC evangelist John Hawley surveyed open hardware trends, and their impact on OS-enabled device and system development.

When you mention open source hardware, people typically think about community-backed hacker boards. However, the open hardware movement is growing on many fronts, including medical devices, rocketry and satellites, 3D printers, cameras, VR gear, and even laptops and servers. At the Embedded Linux Conference Europe in October, John “Warthog9” Hawley, Intel’s evangelist for the MinnowBoard SBC, surveyed the key open hardware trends he saw in 2016. The full video, “Survey of Open Hardware 2016,” can be seen below.

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Also in: Open Source Hardware: From SBCs to Servers

Snapdragon 820 lands on an Android Pico-ITX SBC

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Android
Hardware

Inforce Computing’s model 6640 Pico-ITX SBC is based on a Snapdragon 820 SoC and features 4GB RAM, 4K video, WiFi/BT/GPS wireless, GbE, SATA, and Android 7.

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Samsung’s latest Artik module offers quad A9 SoC

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Linux
Hardware

Samsung has launched a new, Fedora Linux ready Artik 530 COM and development kit, which unlike the dual -Cortex-A7 Artik 520, moves to a quad-core -A9 SoC.

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RecalboxOS and PiE-Ink

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Linux
Hardware
  • [Older] RecalboxOS – Raspberry Pi Gaming System

    If you are interested in gaming then you should look into the RecalboxOS which runs on the Raspberry Pi. RecalboxOS has numerous console emulators and even provides Kodi which is a media center for playing videos, music, pictures, games and more. This article will cover the installation and configuration of the gaming system and not Kodi.

  • PiE-Ink is a Raspberry Pi name tag that uses an e ink display

    In today’s maker edition of “why didn’t we think of that before?”, we have a customisable name tag based on a Raspberry Pi hooked up to an e ink display.

    The “PiE-Ink” was created by user “esper2142“, who is quickly identified as Josh King, a systems engineer at Cisco thanks to the included demo video.

Developer Endorses Dell For Linux

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GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Fwupd Updated With New Support, Developer Endorses Dell For Linux

    Longtime GNOME developer Richard Hughes has announced a new release of fwupd, the open-source utility for updating firmware on Linux in a safe, automatic, and reliable manner.

    Fwupd continues advancing for making it much easier to upgrade firmware for many systems from the Linux desktop. Fwupd supports UEFI capsule updates and other interfaces while for end-users it can be run from the command-line or via front-ends like with GNOME Software integration. With today's first new release on their fwupd-0.8 branch, there are not only fixes but also new features.

  • New fwupd release, and why you should buy a Dell

Announcing PiCluster 1.4

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

I am pleased to announce the new version of PiCluster. In this release, users can connect to a host running an rsyslog server and the PiCluster agent to view the log drain in the PiCluster web console and run searches. This combined integration provides a single pane of glass to monitor physical hosts and Docker containers easily. Let’s take a look on how to enable this functionality.

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BeagleBone Black gains $50 4.3-inch cap touchscreen Cape

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Linux
Hardware

Element14 and Adafruit have launched a 4.3-inch, 480 x 272 capacitive touchscreen for the BeagleBone Black at an unprecedented price of only $50.

Adafruit has launched an Element14 made, 4.3-inch capacitive touchscreen for only $50, making it the only cap touchscreen for the SBC we’ve seen that sells for under $100. The Element 14 LCD Display Cape, also referred to by Adafruit as the 4.3” LCD Capacitive Touchscreen Display Cape for BeagleBone, is a full-color, backlit TFT touchscreen with 480 x 272-pixel resolution. The “high luminance,” 105.5 x 67.25 x 4.75mm display comes with a 69 x 67.5 x 17mm Cape interface board.

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Hardware and Linux Devices

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • DIY Linux laptop: Build your own for $240 with fully open source Olimex Teres I

    Bulgarian open-source hardware outfit Olimex has released the final designs and components for DIY fans...

  • Olimex Teres Open Source Laptop Kit Launches For $240

    The development team over at Olimex has created a new open source laptop kit in the form of the Teres I, which has been designed to provide an affordable DIY system which is supplied in kit form for around $240 or €225.

  • Qualcomm's two mutually-reinforcing monopolies: SEP thicket, baseband processor chipsets [Ed: These baseband processor chipsets are proprietary and have back doors]

    In late December, the Korea Fair Trade Commission held Qualcomm in violation of antitrust laws, and after a reader pointed me to what appears to be Qualcomm's unofficial translation of the decision, I promised "further discussion here at a later stage." Then, a couple of weeks later, the United States Federal Trade Commission sought injunctions against Qualcomm (a complaint was filed in the Northern District of California). A little later, Apple brought its own lawsuit against Qualcomm (see PatentlyApple's post, which contains the complaint, according to paragraph 4 of which Apple claims to have been "overcharged billions of dollars on Qualcomm's illegal scheme" and now "seeks to recover its damages").

  • Full Year 2016 Smartphone Market Top 10 Numbers, and OS platforms and Global Installed Base, all here. Oh, and Q4 market data as well

    Its time to do the full-year smartphone numbers. I think we have just about all the data that will be made public, as increasingly many of the major players don't release smartphone unit sales numbers, and even the number of major analyst houses who used to provide a lot of data has shrunk to two who reliably do that anymore (IDC and Strategy Analytics). So we will do our best. We do get the total market size simply as the average of the big 2 analyst houses. For Q4 that number is 433.6 Million units. It is a growth of 8% vs the same quarter one year ago. But as our industry experienced its first-ever recession earlier in the past year and for two quarters year-on-year sales actually declined, the total year turned up with only slight growth of 3%. We end the year 2016 with still not quite 1.5B smartphones sold, we reached 1,481 million, ie 1.48 Billion. So lets start with the big tables everybody wants. The Top 10 smartphone brands for year 2016:

  • Automated Testing Laboratory for Embedded Linux Distributions

    Paweł Wieczorek describes how he and his colleagues at the Samsung R&D Institute Poland developed an Automated Testing Laboratory to streamline testing of Tizen Common on community-backed SBCs at ELC.

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Tizen News

Mozilla Firefox Quantum

  • Can the new Firefox Quantum regain its web browser market share?
    When Firefox was introduced in 2004, it was designed to be a lean and optimized web browser, based on the bloated code from the Mozilla Suite. Between 2004 and 2009, many considered Firefox to be the best web browser, since it was faster, more secure, offered tabbed browsing and was more customizable through extensions than Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. When Chrome was introduced in 2008, it took many of Firefox’s best ideas and improved on them. Since 2010, Chrome has eaten away at Firefox’s market share, relegating Firefox to a tiny niche of free software enthusiasts and tinkerers who like the customization of its XUL extensions. According to StatCounter, Firefox’s market share of web browsers has fallen from 31.8% in December 2009 to just 6.1% today. Firefox can take comfort in the fact that it is now virtually tied with its former arch-nemesis, Internet Explorer and its variants. All of Microsoft’s browsers only account for 6.2% of current web browsing according to StatCounter. Microsoft has largely been replaced by Google, whose web browsers now controls 56.5% of the market. Even worse, is the fact that the WebKit engine used by Google now represents over 83% of web browsing, so web sites are increasingly focusing on compatibility with just one web engine. While Google and Apple are more supportive of W3C and open standards than Microsoft was in the late 90s, the web is increasingly being monopolized by one web engine and two companies, whose business models are not always based on the best interests of users or their rights.
  • Firefox Nightly Adds CSD Option
    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Firefox 57 is awesome — so awesome that I’m finally using it as my default browser again. But there is one thing it the Linux version of Firefox sorely needs: client-side decoration.

First Renesas based Raspberry Pi clone runs Linux

iWave’s “iW-RainboW-G23S” SBC runs Linux on a Renesas RZ/G1C, and offers -20 to 85°C support and expansion headers including a RPi-compatible 40-pin link. iWave’s iW-RainboW-G23S is the first board we’ve seen to tap the Renesas RZ/G1C SoC, which debuted earlier this year. It’s also the first Renesas based SBC we’ve seen that features the increasingly ubiquitous Raspberry Pi 85 x 56mm footprint, layout, and RPi-compatible 40-pin expansion connector. The board is also notable for providing -20 to 85°C temperature support. Read more Also: GameShell Is An Open Source And Linux-powered Retro Game Console That You’ll Love

Games: SuperTuxKart, Tannenberg, Observer