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Hardware

AMD Gizmosphere Support Comes To Coreboot

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Linux
Hardware

There's now mainline Coreboot support for the Gizmo AMD APU development board.

With this Git commit today there is mainline Coreboot support for the Gizmo/Gizmosphere AMD development board. This development board features an AMD G-Series embedded APU and is similar in nature to the many low-cost ARM development boards.

The Gizmo board consumes less than 10 Watts of power, has an open PCB and lots of expansion/development opportunities with the Gizmo Explorer Kit, and could be nice for hobbyists or those wishing to prototype new AMD x86 embedded systems.

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As Chromebooks catch on, 2014 promises more models

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Hardware

One reason for their popularity is price. They're typically priced between $200 and $300. In addition, some organizations, like those in education, only need Google services such as Google Docs and Google Drive, according to NPD.

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Intel, NVIDIA To Support Google's VP9 Codec

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Hardware

Intel, NVIDIA, ARM, Broadcom, LG, Philips, Samsung, and Realtek are among the many companies that have agreed to incorporate VP9 codec support. Hardware support will be very beneficial as Google begins pushing 4K / Ultra HD resolutions via YouTube. At the moment there aren't any desktop GPUs with drivers offering VP9 (or VP8) hardware-based video playback.

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The Big Iron Crunch

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Hardware

For the past thirty years industry pundits have been predicting the demise of the mainframe, but in the coming years the crowd arguing for mainframe longevity will be retiring, and new blood is going to be hard to come by. Without a fresh influx of interested developers, the purportedly grand benefits of big iron may prove to be a moot point. Running Linux on the mainframe is a good start, but for companies deeply invested in COBOL the time to start the migration is now.

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Samsung merges camera and mobile divisions in a bid to differentiate its smartphones

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Linux
Hardware

The impact of this reorganization isn't yet clear, and might not be felt for a while to come, but it does reiterate Samsung's interest in hybrid devices like the Galaxy S4 Zoom. Bringing the camera and phone designers closer together should also result in tighter collaboration between their teams. Samsung promises to improve the "operation capabilities" of the newly reassigned imaging team and "promote its market leadership."

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Acer introduces $299 touch-screen Chromebook

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Hardware

The device runs on Google’s Linux distro Chrome OS, which always stays up-to-date. So unlike Microsoft’s Windows you don’t have to worry about paying for upgrades every time.

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Intel wakes up and smells the post-PC era

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Hardware

Intel’s Atom processors have been a significant presence in the embedded market, but have only recently begun to break into smartphones and tablets with 32nm Clover Trail+ Atoms, such as the Atom Z2580. Further product wins are expected soon from tablets running on the Atom Z3000 (Bay Trail-T) SoC, which uses the 22nm, 3D Tri-Gate “Silvermont” architecture. Yet, Intel’s mobile market share is still miniscule, and mobile ARM SoCs continue to advance as well. In addition, ARM is now digging into the Atom’s share of the general embedded market.

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Intel's Quarky Arduino Adventure

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Linux
Hardware

linuxinsider.com: With all the cornucopia of Valve-related announcements for gamers over the past few weeks, it may be difficult to imagine that the Linux world could have any more good news in store. That supremely encouraging gaming news, surely, was enough to last us a few good months here in the Linux blogosphere.

Supercomputers Still Rule… and Linux Still Rules Them

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Linux
Hardware

linux.com: With the advent of cloud and virtual data center computing, are the days of supercomputers approaching an end, making them nothing more than trophies for universities and nations to show off when they have their top-ranked systems running?

some odds & ends:

Filed under
Linux
News
Hardware
OSS
  • Raspberry Pi Wireless Inventors Kit Review
  • Richard Stallman on the Painful Birth of GNU
  • Struggling With Some Linux Terminologies? Here's Help
  • Working BMO made out of Lego and Raspberry Pi
  • Call me GNU: The GNU/Linux naming debate, revisited
  • Utilite Linux Mini PC Launches With Prices Starting From Just $99
  • LibreOffice 4.1.2 Released
  • Q&A: To Use Or Not To Use Open Source Software?
  • Mastering rsync and Bash to Backup Your Linux Desktop or Server
  • PixelJunk Shooter is coming to PC, Mac and Linux next month
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