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Hardware

Open Hardware/3-D Printing

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Hardware
OSS

Open Hardware

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Hardware
  • Accelerating Innovation: Michigan Tech patent database/app promotes open-source hardware

    Open-source innovation is making the traditional patent system obsolete. Michigan Technological University associate professor Joshua Pearce and his team work with what is called open-source hardware development.

    “What that means is sort of developing technologies that don’t rely on patents,” Pearce said. “We work collaboratively with engineers and scientists all over the world, and (it’s) fairly successful. And the reason it’s successful is because if you have thousands of people working on something, it tends to get pretty good pretty fast.”

    Pearce said the concept began some time ago with open-source software.

  • Non-profit creates open-source drinking water filter for 1/10th of the cost

    The high-tech vision of open-source software meets low-tech design at non-profit organization OHorizons, an international coalition of innovators working to solve persistent global challenges. The team’s most recent invention is the open-source Wood Mold, designed to allow even the least experienced person to create a BioSand Filter that can deliver clean water at 1/10th of the cost of the traditional method. The Wood Mold is designed to be accessible by anyone who has the DIY, open-source construction manual that OHorizons offers for free online.

Pico-ITX SBC runs Ubuntu on Braswell

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Hardware
Ubuntu

DFI announced an Intel Braswell based “BW051” Pico-ITX SBC with up to 8GB DDR3L, mini-PCIe, SATA 3.0, mSATA, and Linux support.

DFI, which earlier this year tapped Intel’s “Braswell” generation of SoCs for its BW968 COM Express Compact Type 6 module, has now chosen Braswell for a Pico-ITX SBC. The 100 x 72mm BW051 ships with 4-6W Braswell processors including dual or quad-core Celeron models, the quad-core 1.6GHz Pentium N3710, and quad-core, 1.04GHz Atom x5-E8000.

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Arduino-Compatible RISC-V and More

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Hardware
  • HiFive1 Is an Open-Source, Arduino-Compatible RISC-V Dev Kit

    Bay Area startup SiFive has announced the Freedom Everywhere 310 (FE310) system-on-chip — the industry’s first commercially-available SoC based on the free, open-source RISC-V architecture, along with the corresponding low-cost, Arduino-compatible HiFive1 development kit.

  • Samsung Defection From ARM to RISC-V.

    It was always thought that, when ARM relinquished its independence, its customers would look around for other alternatives.

    The nice thing about RISC-V is that it’s independent, open source and royalty-free.

    And RISC-V is what Samsung is reported to be using for an IoT CPU in preference to ARM.

  • Neutralize ME firmware on SandyBridge and IvyBridge platforms

    First introduced in Intel’s 965 Express Chipset Family, the Intel Management Engine (ME) is a separate computing environment physically located in the (G)MCH chip (for Core 2 family CPUs which is separate from the northbridge), or PCH chip replacing ICH(for Core i3/i5/i7 which is integrated with northbridge).

Open/Hacker Hardware

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Hardware
OSS

Linux Devices

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Android
Linux
Hardware
  • Jolla Experiments With A Sailfish OS Watch

    Jolla engineers have spent the past few weeks porting Sailfish OS to an Android smartwatch as they feel their Linux-based OS is particularly suited for small screens.

    Jolla isn't announcing a Sailfish Watch product, but rather looking at it as part of their licensing strategy to offer their OS to smartwatch manufacturers. Joona Petrell shared that they had technical and design inspiration help off the Asteroid Smartwatch OS and their libHybris layer allowed them to quickly bring-up Sailfish and their UI on the Android smartwatch.

  • Amazon extends AWS IoT with offline processing
  • The Great Raspberry PiTop Giveaway
  • Using a fully free OS for devices in the home

    There are more and more devices around the home (and in many small offices) running a GNU/Linux-based firmware. Consider routers, entry-level NAS appliances, smart phones and home entertainment boxes.

  • Samsung have Invested $10 Million in Svace, Security Solution to Analyze Tizen Apps

    As part of its security measures, Samsung are using the SVACE technology (Security Vulnerabilities and Critical Errors Detector) to detect potential vulnerabilities and errors that might exist in source code of applications created for the Tizen Operating System (OS). This technology was developed by ISP RAS (Institute for System Programming of the Russian Academy of Sciences), who are based in Moscow, Russia.

  • Trouble at Cyanogen [Ed: it chose to be a Microsoft proxy and look what happened; the usual!]

Open source lab-on-a-board costs $29

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Linux
Hardware

The tiny, open source “EspoTek Labrador” board combines an oscilloscope, waveform generator, power supply, logic analyzer, and multimeter.

We’ve seen several open source projects that have slashed the price and complexity of digital acquisition (DAQ), testing and measurement, and other lab gear, such as the Red Pitaya, which is now selling kits under the STEMlab name starting at $199. Now, Melbourne, Australia startup Espotek has gone to Crowd Supply to launch an “EspoTek Labrador” board with somewhat similar electronics lab functions for only $29, with worldwide shipments due Jan. 31, 2017.

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Open Hardware

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Hardware
OSS

'Opening' Hardware

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Hardware
  • AMD announced a new release of Radeon Open Compute Platform

    AMD announced a new release of Radeon Open Compute Platform (ROCm) featuring software support of new Radeon GPU hardware, new math libraries, and a rich foundation of modern programming languages, designed to speed development of high-performance, energy-efficient heterogeneous computing systems. AMD also announced planned support of OpenCL™ and for a wide range of CPUs in upcoming releases of ROCm, including support for AMD's upcoming "Zen"-based CPUs, Cavium ThunderX CPUs, and IBM Power 8 CPUs. The advances further cement ROCm's position as the most versatile open source platform for GPU computing.

  • AMD Goes Open Source in Newest ROCm Platform Update

    Processor maker is going all in for developing and sharing GPU-related hardware and software for high-end computing use cases.
    In days gone by, one rarely heard of IT companies getting involved in the open sourcing of hardware blueprints. It was always about software. This is happening more frequently all the time and making a significant impact in many enterprises. It's yet another seismic change that has hit the larger-picture IT world.

    This is relevant now because companies such as Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Brocade, Cisco Systems and a number of others through the Open Compute Project are now dedicated to designing and open sourcing items such as new-gen servers, racks, routers, switches, specialized teleco equipment and storage appliances, in addition to offering previously proprietary expertise to others in how to build new-gen IT hardware.

  • RusEFI open-source engine-control hardware now working in the real world

    RusEFI isn't anywhere near a works-right-out-of-the-box system, even now. It's hardware for the expert user who is comfortable doing everything from soldering to writing code, and it's all absolutely open-source, on both the hardware and software sides. The advantage of this? According to RusEFI developer Andrey Belomutskiy, "You are free to criticize/change software and hardware without being yelled/threatened/banned, in the spirit of open source."

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Updates, 2017 Linux Security Summit, Software Updates for Embedded Linux and More

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • The 2017 Linux Security Summit
    The past Thursday and Friday was the 2017 Linux Security Summit, and once again I think it was a great success. A round of thanks to James Morris for leading the effort, the program committee for selecting a solid set of talks (we saw a big increase in submissions this year), the presenters, the attendees, the Linux Foundation, and our sponsor - thank you all! Unfortunately we don't have recordings of the talks, but I've included my notes on each of the presentations below. I've also included links to the slides, but not all of the slides were available at the time of writing; check the LSS 2017 slide archive for updates.
  • Key Considerations for Software Updates for Embedded Linux and IoT
    The Mirai botnet attack that enslaved poorly secured connected embedded devices is yet another tangible example of the importance of security before bringing your embedded devices online. A new strain of Mirai has caused network outages to about a million Deutsche Telekom customers due to poorly secured routers. Many of these embedded devices run a variant of embedded Linux; typically, the distribution size is around 16MB today. Unfortunately, the Linux kernel, although very widely used, is far from immune to critical security vulnerabilities as well. In fact, in a presentation at Linux Security Summit 2016, Kees Cook highlighted two examples of critical security vulnerabilities in the Linux kernel: one being present in kernel versions from 2.6.1 all the way to 3.15, the other from 3.4 to 3.14. He also showed that a myriad of high severity vulnerabilities are continuously being found and addressed—more than 30 in his data set.
  • APNIC-sponsored proposal could vastly improve DNS resilience against DDoS

today's howtos

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