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Hardware

Raspberry Pi foundation merges with CoderDojo Foundation

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

The Raspberry Pi Foundation and the CoderDojo Foundation have merged in order to combine forces and accelerate both organisation's mission to teach kids how to code.

Raspberry Pi Foundation CEO Philip Colligan wrote that the two organisations “see an opportunity to do even more by joining forces.” CoderDojo's executive director Giustina Mizzoni says the merger means her organisation's students and volunteer mentors will enjoy “access to the best possible support, including access to the world’s best educational materials and resources.”

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Also: ARM debuts Cortex-A75 and Cortex-A55 with AI in mind

Linux Devices: FriendlyElec, NComputing, CubieTech

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Linux
Hardware

Linux-based gizmo offers remote 3D printer control and sharing

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Linux
Hardware

The $70 “Waggle” remote controller device for 3D printers offers a mobile app with a video feed and temp controls, plus a cloud-based slicing service.

A Seoul-based startup called Ateam Ventures is closing in on its $10,000 Kickstarter goal for a Waggle 3D printer controller equipped with WiFi and a 720p video camera. The early bird packages are gone, but you can pre-order a Waggle for $70, discounted from the $99 retail price. The campaign runs through June 15, with shipments due in September.

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Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware

Linux Devices: Raspberry Pi, PIC32, Lime Micro

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Hardware
  • Apollo Lake COM Express module has onboard microSD and eMMC

    The COM Express Compact Type 6 “MSC C6C-AL” taps Intel’s Apollo Lake and offers up to 16GB DDR3L, microSD and optional eMMC, plus support for 5x PCIe slots.

  • How to create an Internet-in-a-Box on a Raspberry Pi

    If you're a homeschool parent or a teacher with a limited budget, Internet-in-a-Box might be just what you've been looking for. Its hardware requirements are very modest—a Raspberry Pi 3, a 64GB microSD card, and a power supply—but it provides access to a wealth of educational resources, even to students without internet access in the most remote areas of the world.

  • Squeeze Pi: Adventures in home audio

    The Squeezebox Touch provided a family-friendly interface to access our music library, either directly on the device or via a range of mobile applications. Logitech discontinued its development in 2012, but I was happy as they open sourced the Squeezebox's server software as Logitech Media Server and supplied the open source code used on the physical Squeezebox devices.

  • Evaluating PIC32 for Hardware Experiments

    PIC32 uses the MIPS32 instruction set. Since MIPS has been around for a very long time, and since the architecture was prominent in workstations, servers and even games consoles in the late 1980s and 1990s, remaining in widespread use in more constrained products such as routers as this century has progressed, the GNU toolchain (GCC, binutils) has had a long time to comfortably support MIPS. Although the computer you are using is not particularly likely to be MIPS-based, cross-compiling versions of these tools can be built to run on, say, x86 or x86-64 while generating MIPS32 executable programs.

  • Want a Raspberry Pi-powered PC? This $50 case turns the Pi into a desktop

    As long as you keep your expectations in check, it's perfectly feasible to run the latest Raspberry Pi as a desktop computer.

    However, the base Raspberry Pi 3 is a bare bones board, so anyone wanting to set it up as a desktop PC will need to buy their own case and other add-ons.

  • Open source LimeNET SDR computers run Ubuntu Core on Intel Core

    Lime Micro has launched three open source “LimeNET” SDR systems that run Ubuntu Core on Intel Core CPUs, including one with a new LimeSDR QPCIe board.

    Lime Microsystems has gone to Crowd Supply to launch three fully open source LimeNET computers for software defined radio (SDR) applications. The systems run Ubuntu “Snappy” Core Linux on Intel’s Core processors, enabling access to an open, community-based LimeSDR App Store using the Ubuntu Core snap packaging and update technology. The SDR processing is handled by three variations on last year’s open source LimeSDR board, which run Intel’s (Altera) Cyclone IV FPGA.

TinkerOS Android 13.11.0.4 Released

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Android
Hardware
Debian

Asus has released a new version of their TinkerOS Android distribution for the Asus Tinker Board. It’s still powered by Android 6.0.1 Marshmallow running on a 3.10.0 kernel. But unlike the previous release, Android 13.11.0.4 is not classed as a beta release. The release seems pretty stable.

The TinkerOS Android release offers a few notable improvements including some handy bug fixes. The previous Android image produced fuzzy text on some HDMI monitors. The only way to obtain sharp text was to reset the HDMI resolution after each boot. This issue is fixed in the new release. The release also fixes a volume consistent issue in the setting and notification bar.

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Intel’s “Euclid” robotics compute module on sale for $399

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Linux
Hardware

Intel has launched its “Euclid” robotics compute module, which runs Ubuntu on an Atom x7-Z8700, and offers a RealSense 3D cam, WiFi, and sensors.

When Intel demonstrated its Intel Euclid robotics controller at last August’s Intel Developer Conference, the company gave no indication of its release date or even if it would be more than a proof of concept. The candy-bar sized module is now available for order as part of a $399 Intel Euclid Development Kit, with shipments due by the end of the month. A Euclid community site has gone live with tutorials and documentation.

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Arduino shows off LoRa gateway and node shields

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Linux
Hardware

Arduino is prepping a “LoRa Gateway Kit” to bring LoRa wireless to its Linux-driven Arduino Tian, plus a “LoRa Node Kit” for the Arduino Primo.

At the Maker Faire Bay Area, Arduino showcased its new Arduino LoRa Gateway and LoRa Node shields that run on Arduino boards. Due to arrive later this year, the boards will be offered in a LoRa Gateway Shield Kit for the Linino Linux-enabled Arduino Tian, and a LoRa Node Shield Kit designed for the Arduino Primo or other Arduinos with at least 32KB of flash.

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Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware
  • Compact, rugged Apollo Lake computer has swappable SATA

    Axiomtek’s tough, Linux-ready “eBOX100-312-FL” embedded computer offers a Celeron N3350 SoC, a SATA bay, and 2x mini-PCIe, HDMI, GbE, and USB 3.0 ports.

  • Rugged, Linux-ready Qseven module taps Apollo Lake

    The “MSC Q7-AL” is a Qseven COM with Intel Apollo Lake, triple display outputs, and options including -40 to 85°C support, 64GB eMMC, and a 3.5-inch carrier.

  • Ubuntu-ready SMB net appliance has dual mini-PCIe slots

    Aaeon’s “FWS-2271” network appliance offers Intel Apollo Lake SoCs, up to 16GB RAM, 4x to 6x GbE ports, 2x mini-PCIe slots, and shock/vibration resistance.

    The FWS-2271 network appliance for SOHO and SMB customers has updated Aaeon’s earlier Intel Braswell-based FWS-2260. Instead of Braswell, you get a choice of Intel Apollo Lake generation dual-core Celeron N3350 or quad-core Pentium N4200, both with 6W TDP. The Ubuntu-friendly device supports features including firewall, VPN, load balancing, software defined WAN (SD-WAN), Unified Threat Management (UTM), wireless Network Access Controller (NAC) and Virtual Customer Premise Equipment (vCPE).

Pi Desktop: This kit turns your Raspberry Pi into a Linux desktop

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

The Pi Desktop kit from Premier Farnell -- the largest manufacturer of the Raspberry Pi -- includes an add-on board containing: an mSATA interface, an intelligent power controller (plus real-time-clock and battery); a heat sink; a USB adapter (Micro-Type A); spacers and screws -- and the box to keep it all in.

The company said the kit can help Raspberry Pi fans turn the board into a Pi into a "fully featured Linux-based desktop" computer "within minutes" which can then be connected to a display via the HDMI interface.

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