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Hardware

Meet the Entroware Zeus, a Powerful Linux Laptop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

A hulking great 15.6-inch laptop with the power to match. On paper, I’m impressed at how well the Entroware Zeus manages to balance top tier performance and yet retain the benefits of portability.

The sleek aluminium chassis measures just 18.6mm thick, and the whole laptop weighs in at just 1.9KG — surprisingly light for a portable workstation.

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Devices: Portwell’s and Habey’s Linux-Ready Boards

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Graphics and Hardware: VC5 Gallium3D, RADV Vulkan Driver, and AMD Ryzen

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware
  • VC5 Gallium3D Driver Close To Merging To Mainline Mesa

    Broadcom's shiny new VC5 Gallium3D driver for supporting more modern graphics on future SoCs is close to merging to mainline Mesa.

    Details on VC5 are still scarce, such as when we'll see this new Broadcom graphics processor in SoCs/devices (hopefully future Raspberry Pis), but Eric Anholt continues developing this driver. VC5 does support OpenGL ES 3.0 and will also eventually be working on OpenCL and Vulkan support.

  • More Vega/GFX9 Fixes Posted For RADV Vulkan Driver

    It's looking like it shouldn't be much longer before David Airlie has the RADV Mesa Vulkan driver working well on AMD's new Radeon RX Vega graphics cards.

  • AMD Ryzen 3 CPUFreq Governor Benchmarks On Linux 4.13

    For those curious about the performance impact of the different CPUFreq governors on a low-end Ryzen 3 processor, here are some benchmarks.

    Using the Linux 4.13 Git kernel atop Ubuntu 17.04 with the AMD Ryzen 3 1200, I tested CPUFreq's ondemand, performance, powersave, schedutil, and conservative governors. As a reminder, Ubuntu defaults to CPUFreq's "ondemand" governor for AMD processors while the Intel CPUs using the P-State driver use "powersave" as their default.

  • ASRock AB350 Pro4: A Decent, Linux-Friendly Ryzen Motherboard For As Low As $69 USD

Raspberry Pi Zero and Zero W: Linux computing in an even smaller package

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

When the original Raspberry Pi (Rpi) became available in 2012, it was amazing that a Linux computer could fit in the palm of your hand for the low, low price of $35. On the other hand, if you’re a student without a real job, for which these boards were in part intended, $35 can still be a lot of money. To bring this cost down even further, the RPi team announced the RPi Zero in late 2015, which is available for $5, and even came as a “gift” on the cover of that December’s MagPi magazine.

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Devices: Automotive Grade Linux, OSNEXUS, Arbor

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Microsoft Hardware Woes

Filed under
Hardware
Microsoft

OBD II connected fleet computer runs Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

iWave’s ARM-based “OBD II” car computer features 4G LTE, WiFi, Bluetooth, GPS, an IMU, and an OBD II connector to onboard telematics.

iWave’s “Connected Car Device – OBD II” is an OEM-focused automotive device for fleet management, driving behavior, insurance company monitoring, cab aggregators, remote diagnostics, two-wheeler applications, and “immobilization,” which may refer to breathalyzer connected gear.

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Hardware: Samsung (Tizen Inside), AMD and ARM

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Samsung Gear POP – New fitness device on its way as it gets bluetooth certified
  • AMD Confirms Linux Performance Marginality Problem Affecting Some, Doesn't Affect Epyc / TR

    This morning I was on a call with AMD and they are now able to confirm they have reproduced the Ryzen "segmentation fault issue" and are working with affected customers.

    AMD engineers found the problem to be very complex and characterize it as a performance marginality problem exclusive to certain workloads on Linux. The problem may also affect other Unix-like operating systems such as FreeBSD, but testing is ongoing for this complex problem and is not related to the recently talked about FreeBSD guard page issue attributed to Ryzen. AMD's testing of this issue under Windows hasn't uncovered problematic behavior.

  • Chip IP designer ARM becomes “Arm” — or is it arm?

    Chip IP designer ARM Holdings has released a video that rebrands itself as “Arm” and promises to bring “happiness for everyone.”

    Eleven months after UK based semiconductor IP designer ARM Holdings was acquired by Japanese technology giant Softbank Group for about $31 billion, Arm has quietly rebranded itself with a hipper, lower-case “arm” logo. The strapless new look first debuted in a platitude rich Aug. 1 YouTube video (see below) spotted on Underconsideration.com’s BrandNew page. The name change seemed to have been challenged by a bit of indecision, judging by the recent edit history on Arm’s Wikipedia page (see Aug. 7, 2017 screenshot farther below), and the Arm website shows some examples of ARM, Arm, and arm. In an email to LinuxGizmos, Phil Hughes, Arm’s Director of Public Relations, wrote: “basically arm is all lowercase for the logo and when used in text is Arm.”

The Price of Freedom — A Review of the Librem 15 v3

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

Purism is a wild startup located in South San Francisco. Their mission? Providing a superior hardware experience for people who love privacy and software freedom. Purism is building and shipping GNU/Linux laptops, and is interested in developing a phone as well.

The Purism campaign originally launched on CrowdSupply late 2014. Since then, the company has shipped two revisions, and now offers three different models to choose from: an 11-inch convertible tablet, a 13-inch laptop, and a 15-inch powerhouse.

For a few years, I have strongly desired having a quality Linux laptop that has great hardware. So, I’ve taken the plunge on getting the latest 15-inch Librem model from Purism.

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Stable kernels 4.16.3, 4.15.18 and 4.14.35

ExTiX 18.4 – “The Ultimate Linux System” – with LXQt 0.12.0, Refracta Tools, Calamares Installer and kernel 4.16.2-exton – Build 180419

I have made a new version of ExTiX – The Ultimate Linux System. I call it ExTiX 18.4 LXQt Live DVD. (The previous version was 17.8 from 171012). Read more

Migrating to Linux: Network and System Settings

Linux gives you a lot of control over network and system settings. On your desktop, Linux lets you tweak just about anything on the system. Most of these settings are exposed in plain text files under the /etc directory. Here I describe some of the most common settings you’ll use on your desktop Linux system. A lot of settings can be found in the Settings program, and the available options will vary by Linux distribution. Usually, you can change the background, tweak sound volume, connect to printers, set up displays, and more. While I won't talk about all of the settings here, you can certainly explore what's in there. Read more

Meet Bo, an Ubuntu-Powered Social Robot with AI Capabilities

Meet Bo, a social robot with AI (Artificial Intelligence) capabilities, powered by Canonical's Ubuntu Linux operating system and optimized to welcome customers, as well as to help them navigate to find products and areas in your organization. Bo was already used by several well-known brands like Etisalat and BT in a bunch of scenarios, including hospitality and retail scenarios, and it's being tested in large shopping centers in the United Kingdom, such as Lakeside. Read more