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Hardware

C.H.I.P. and Raspberry Pi 2

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Linux
Hardware
  • C.H.I.P. – Not A Replacement For Beast, But A Useful Controller Board

    I’ve been looking for an ARMed replacement for Beast’s power-sucking/fanfull/large corpse. This isn’t it. It is a very well documented controller that ships with a minimal installation of Debian GNU/Linux complete with GUI. I could, for instance, use this thing to make a pulsewidth modulator for a power supply. It’s obviously overkill for such a task but at the advertised price, $9, it’s OK.

  • Make a $40 Linux or Android PC with new Raspberry Pi 2 rival

    If you want to build a powerful $40 Linux or Android PC with 4K video support, consider Hardkernel's Odroid-C2 computer.

    The developer board is an uncased computer like the popular Raspberry Pi 2, which sells for $35. But South Korea-based Hardkernel claims Odroid-C2 has more horsepower than its popular rival and can be a desktop replacement.

Arduino, Open Source Hardware

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Hardware
OSS
  • 17-Year-Old Kid Tells How To Make A Real BB-8 Droid Powered By Arduino
  • Telecoms Look Past Cisco and HP to Open Source Hardware

    Now, a new wave of companies aims to push this movement even further. This morning, four big-name telecoms— AT&T, Verizon, Germany’s Deutsche Telekom, and South Korea’s SK Telecom—agreed to join the Open Compute Project. Through a sub-project dedicated to the needs of telecoms, they too will explore open source servers and networking equipment that can boost efficiency and reduce costs. “Everyone is looking for that same synergy and agility,” Gagan Puranik, a director of architecture planning at Verizon, says of his company and others who have joined Facebook’s experiment in open source hardware. “The learning and the sharing will go both ways.”

  • Large Telcos Flock to Facebook's Open Compute Project, Open Hardware [Ed: not code]

    According to Facebook's published guidelines, the new OCP Telco Project will advance the following objectives: 1) communicating telco technical requirements effectively to the OCP community; 2) strengthening the OCP ecosystem to address the deployment and operational needs of telcos; and 3) bringing OCP innovations to telco data center infrastructure for increased cost-savings and agility.

A Massive ARM v6/v7 Rework Is Landing With Linux 4.5 Plus Raspberry Pi 2 Support

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Hardware

Olof Johansson sent in all of the ARM SoC updates for the Linux 4.5 merge window on Friday night. Most significant is the ARM multi-platform code update. Olof explained, "This branch is the culmination of 5 years of effort to bring the ARMv6 and ARMv7 platforms together such that they can all be enabled and boot the same kernel. It has been a tremendous amount of cleanup and refactoring by a huge number of people, and creation of several new (and major) subsystems to better abstract out all the platform details in an appropriate manner. The bulk of this branch is a large patchset from Arnd that brings several of the more minor and older platforms we have closer to multiplatform support. Among these are MMP, S3C64xx, Orion5x, mv78xx0 and realview Much of this is moving around header files from old mach directories, but there are also some cleanup patches of debug_ll (lowlevel debug per-platform options) and other parts."

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Open Hardware

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Hardware
OSS

Devices Getting Smaller (With Linux)

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Hardware
  • Raspberry Picademy USA Accepting Applications

    Are you an enthusiastic individual that is interested in using the Raspberry Pi in the classroom and in community education programs? Then get ready to fill out your application for Raspberry Picademy USA! This will be the first time ever that the Raspberry Pi Foundation will be offering a Picademy in the United States. If you haven’t ever heard of Picademy, or have and are looking to participate, then I’ll answer some basic questions for you on the ins and outs of Raspberry Picademy USA.

  • Wintel Is Sick

    There isn’t any end in sight. As ARM and particularly ARM on mobile devices grows Wintel is being squeezed out of personal IT. Long ago, I and many others cut out That Other OS. Now many millions, billions even, are cutting out Intel. Both heads of the Wintel monopoly are diversifying as fast as they can and cutting prices or moving “profit centers” to avoid being trapped under the weight of their own handiwork. The world just doesn’t need either any longer but it does take a few years to switch over so much installed base of IT. It’s a process, not an event, just like sickness. It remains to be seen whether this is a mortal wounding or just an injury both can survive. I expect that both will survive but both will be cut down to size and only get a normal share of the pie instead of the whole thing.

  • Opportunities And Challenges That The Internet Of Things Creates

    Internet of Things is targeting not only devices, but also sensors. It’s incredible how they can be attached everywhere and record necessary data. For example, wearables are collecting data about fitness habits of their owners and this helps to update the devices with more attention paid to the functionality in high demand. Or, for example, network-connected sensors are used to inform farmers about the pregnancy and sickness of animals. Just imagine if your coffee cup could know how hot you want your coffee to be and how much sugar or milk you add. Collected data would allow businesses to get more specific information on how their products are used, how they break down and what is expected from them in the future.

Open Hardware

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Hardware
OSS

Liberal Hardware

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Hardware
OSS
  • Google, HP, Oracle Join RISC-V

    RISC-V is on the march as an open source alternative to ARM and Mips. Fifteen sponsors, including a handful of high tech giants, are queuing up to be the first members of its new trade group which will host next week its third workshop for the processor core.

    RISC V is the latest evolution of the original RISC core developed more than 25 years ago by Berkeley’s David Patterson and Stanford’s John Hennessey. In August 2014, Patterson and colleagues launched an open source effort around the core as an enabler for a new class of processors and SoCs with small teams and volumes that can’t afford licensed cores or get the attention of their vendors.

  • An Open Source Reference Architecture For Real-Time Stock Prediction

    While this post does not cover the details of stock analysis, it does propose a way to solve the hard problem of real-time data analysis at scale, using open source tools in a highly scalable and extensible reference architecture. The architecture below is focused on financial trading, but it also applies to real-time use cases across virtually every industry. More information on the architecture covered in this article is also available online via The Linux Foundation, Slideshare, YouTube, and Pivotal Open Source Hub, where the components in this architecture can be downloaded.

  • Open-Source Tessellation Lands For Pre-Broadwell Intel Hardware

    Back on Christmas was news of patches for implementing tessellation shader support for Intel Ivy Bridge and Haswell graphics hardware after support had already landed for Broadwell and newer within the Mesa driver. Support for those older generations is now present in Mesa.

    As of this afternoon, Kenneth Graunke's work for implementing GL_ARB_tessellation_shader support for Ivy Bridge and Haswell is now within Mesa Git master. This makes tessellation support implemented for all hardware capable of doing so -- Sandy Bridge and older are not.

10 more Raspberry Pi projects primed for IT

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Linux
Hardware

The Raspberry Pi was created as an educational platform but has become one of the most popular embedded systems platforms on earth with a full copy of Linux and a rabid community of DIY-minded developers. That combination alone makes the Raspberry Pi a natural fit for hacking together enterprise IT applications and devices. Add in its low cost and the ready availability of open source solutions, and you can quickly see how previously expensive systems and devices are suddenly within reach of IT departments willing to experiment with Raspberry Pi, as my first foray into DIY IT Raspberry Pi projects showed.

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Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware
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More in Tux Machines

GNOME News: Black Lab Drops GNOME and Further GNOME Experiments in Meson

  • Ubuntu-Based Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.1 Drops GNOME 3 for MATE Desktop
    Coming about two weeks after the release of Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11, which is based on the Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system using the HWE (hardware enablement) kernel from Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak), Black Lab Enterprise Linux 11.0.1 appears to be an unexpected maintenance update addressing a few important issues reported by users lately.
  • 3.26 Developments
    My approach to development can often differ from my peers. I prefer to spend the early phase of a cycle doing lots of prototypes of various features we plan to implement. That allows me to have the confidence necessary to know early in the cycle what I can finish and where to ask for help.
  • Further experiments in Meson
    Meson is definitely getting more traction in GNOME (and other projects), with many components adding support for it in parallel to autotools, or outright switching to it. There are still bugs, here and there, and we definitely need to improve build environments — like Continuous — to support Meson out of the box, but all in all I’m really happy about not having to deal with autotools any more, as well as being able to build the G* stack much more quickly when doing continuous integration.

Fedora and Red Hat

Debian and Derivatives

  • Reproducible Builds: week 108 in Stretch cycle
  • Debuerreotype
    The project is named “Debuerreotype” as an homage to the photography roots of the word “snapshot” and the daguerreotype process which was an early method of taking photographs. The essential goal is to create “photographs” of a minimal Debian rootfs, so the name seemed appropriate (even if it’s a bit on the “mouthful” side).
  • The end of Parsix GNU/Linux
    The Debian-based Parsix distribution has announced that it will be shutting down six months after the Debian "Stretch" release.
  • Privacy-focused Debian 9 'Stretch' Linux-based operating system Tails 3.0 reaches RC status
    If you want to keep the government and other people out of your business when surfing the web, Tails is an excellent choice. The Linux-based operating system exists solely for privacy purposes. It is designed to run from read-only media such as a DVD, so that there are limited possibilities of leaving a trail. Of course, even though it isn't ideal, you can run it from a USB flash drive too, as optical drives have largely fallen out of favor with consumers. Today, Tails achieves an important milestone. Version 3.0 reaches RC status -- meaning the first release candidate (RC1). In other words, it may soon be ready for a stable release -- if testing confirms as much. If you want to test it and provide feedback, you can download the ISO now.

OSS Leftovers

  • Chef expands its cloud and container menu
    Chef, a leading DevOps company, announced at ChefConf 2017 that it was adding new capabilities to it flagship Continous Automation/DevOps program, Chef Automate. This enables enterprises to transition from server- and virtual machine- (VM) based IT systems to cloud-native and container-first environments with consistent automation and DevOps practices.
  • Nextcloud 12: The bigger, better, in-house small business cloud
    It's not even been a year since Frank Karlitschek, co-founder and former CTO of ownCloud, forked ownCloud into Nextcloud. Since then, this do-it-yourself, open-source Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud has become increasingly popular. Now, its latest version, Nextcloud 12, the program is adding more Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) features.
  • The Spirit of Open Source
  • What happened to Mastodon after its moment in the spotlight?
    More than a month later, the buzz over Mastodon has quieted. But though it may not be making headlines, the service continues to grow.
  • Mozilla: One Step Closer to a Closed Internet
    We’re deeply disheartened. Today’s FCC vote to repeal and replace net neutrality protections brings us one step closer to a closed internet. Although it is sometimes hard to describe the “real” impacts of these decisions, this one is easy: this decision leads to an internet that benefits Internet Service Providers (ISPs), not users, and erodes free speech, competition, innovation and user choice.
  • The eternal battle for OpenStack's soul will conclude in three years. Again
    After six years as a formal project, OpenStack has survived numerous raids and famines and now finds itself in a not-too-weird space of being boring, on-premises infrastructure. That is, “boring” in the good way of focusing on what users want and fixing existing problems, only chasing shiny objects – cough, PaaS, cough, containers, cough, orchestration – as much as needed.
  • With version 2.0, Crate.io’s database tools put an emphasis on IoT
    Crate.io, the winner of our Disrupt Europe 2014 Battlefield, is launching version 2.0 of its CrateDB database today. The tool, which is available in both an open source and enterprise version, started out as a general-purpose but highly scalable SQL database. Over time, though, the team found that many of its customers were using the service for managing their machine data and, unsurprisingly, decided to focus its efforts on better supporting those clients.
  • NewSQL CockroachDB Ready for Prime Time
    There's a new open source database on the block. Although it has a name that will most likely make you cringe for the first dozen or so times you hear it -- CockroachDB -- I have a feeling that if it isn't already on your radar, it will be soon.
  • Windows 10 S Won't Support Fedora, SUSE Linux, and Ubuntu
  • Manage Linux servers with a Windows admin's toolkit [Ed: Well, the solution is learning GNU tools, not relying on proprietary stuff with back doors from Microsoft]
  • FreeBSD quarterly status report
  • openbsd changes of note 622
  • Book Review: Relayd and Httpd Mastery

    Overall an excellent book which is typical Michael W Lucas writing style. Easy to follow, clear cut instructions, and tons of new stuff to learn. If one must use OpenBSD or FreeBSD, then the chances are high that one will stick with the defaults that come with OpenBSD. No need to use fat Apache, or Nginx/Lighttpd web server especially when httpd and relayd audited for security by OpenBSD core team.

  • Guix System Distribution (GuixSD) 0.13.0 GNU/Linux OS Supports 64-bit ARM CPUs
    The GNU Guix and GuixSD 0.13.0 releases are here about five months after the December 2016 launch of version 0.12.0, and it appears to be a major milestone implementing a few important changes. First off, this release can now be installed on computers powered by AArch64 (64-bit ARM) processors.
  • The Good And Bad In WikiTribune, Wikipedia Founder's Open-Source News Site
    Countering the fake news threat has become a real challenge for social media platforms, which also serve as avenues of news dissemination along with the traditional media outlets.
  • Android Studio 3.0 Canary 1
  • Jaded by Java? Android now supports Kotlin programming language
  • Rcpp 0.12.11: Loads of goodies
    The elevent update in the 0.12.* series of Rcpp landed on CRAN yesterday following the initial upload on the weekend, and the Debian package and Windows binaries should follow as usual. The 0.12.11 release follows the 0.12.0 release from late July, the 0.12.1 release in September, the 0.12.2 release in November, the 0.12.3 release in January, the 0.12.4 release in March, the 0.12.5 release in May, the 0.12.6 release in July, the 0.12.7 release in September, the 0.12.8 release in November, the 0.12.9 release in January, and the 0.12.10.release in March --- making it the fifteenth release at the steady and predictable bi-montly release frequency.
  • Master Haskell Programming with Free Books
    Haskell is a standardized, general-purpose, polymorphically statically typed, lazy, purely functional language, very different from many programming languages. Recent innovations include static polymorphic typing, higher-order functions, user-definable algebraic data types, a module system, and more. It has built-in concurrency and parallelism, debuggers, profilers, rich libraries and an active community, with approximately 5,400 third-party open source libraries and tools.
  • [Older] Manifesto: Rules for standards-makers

    If we work together on a project based on open tech, these are the principles I will try to stick to. I wanted to put all this in one place, so I can pass it along to future software developers.