Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Hardware

Android for All: Broadcom Gives Developers Keys to the VideoCore Kingdom

Filed under
Android
Hardware
OSS

The community of open source mobile developers around the world are a vocal bunch – and here at Broadcom we’ve heard their call.

To date, there’s been a dearth of documentation and vendor-developed open source drivers for the graphics subsystems of mobile systems-on-a-chip (SoC). Binary drivers prevent users from fixing bugs or otherwise improving the graphics stack, and complicate the task of porting new operating systems to a device without vendor assistance.

But that’s changing, and Broadcom is taking up the cause.

Read more ►

Tiny ARM/FPGA Zynq COM does Debian

Filed under
Hardware
Debian

PLDA has launched an SODIMM-like computer-on-module claimed to be the smallest Xilinx Zynq COM yet, supported with a carrier board and Debian Linux BSP

Read more ►

Raspberry Pi marks 2nd birthday with plan for open source graphics driver

Filed under
Hardware

That "blob" is the closed source driver code that the Pi requires today. "In common with every other mobile graphics core, using the VideoCore IV 3D graphics core on the Pi requires a block of closed-source binary driver code (a 'blob') which talks to the hardware," Upton wrote. "Our existing open-source graphics drivers are a thin shim running on the ARM11, which talks to that blob via a communication driver in the Linux kernel. The lack of true open-source graphics drivers and documentation is widely acknowledged to be a significant problem for Linux on ARM, as it prevents users from fixing driver bugs, adding features and generally understanding what their hardware is doing."

Read more ►

Arduino-compatible open SBC taps Cortex-A5 SoC

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Newark Element14′s $79, Linux-ready “SAMA5D3 Xplained” SBC showcases Atmel’s SAMA5D3 processor, with features like dual LAN ports and Arduino compatibility.

Read more ►

Rikomagic MK902 LE is an ARM-based Linux PC

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

The folks at UK-based Cloudsto have added a new device to their range of small, ARM-based Linux computers.

The Rikomagic MK902 LE is a small box with a Rockchip quad-core processor, 2GB of RAM, and up to 16GB of storage. It ships with Ubuntu Linux, and it’s available from the Cloudsto shop for £94.99 and up, or about $159.

Read more ►

The NVIDIA GTX 750 Ti Maxwell Continues Running Great On Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware

Back on Tuesday I delivered a launch-day review of the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti on Linux. This first graphics card built on NVIDIA's new Maxwell architecture has been running fantastic under Linux for being a mid-range graphics card. The GM107 GPU core found on the GTX 750 Ti is incredibly power efficient, as was shown in numerous articles on launch-day. For those curious more about the GeForce GTX 750 Ti Linux performance, here are some more OpenCL and OpenGL performance results.

Read more ►

A Look into the Open Source Hardware Community

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

AS you may know, just few weeks ago OSHWA published the results from 2013 Open Hardware Community survey. You can find original datasheets and everything here. Despite raw data is good, I thought it was good to spend some time looking at the data trying to gather more insights, when possible, still keeping in mind that the survey samples a very limited and polarized (OSHWA centric) chunk of the community. But we need to start from something in a way.

Read more ►

Embedded World: Silica dev boards run Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

The first is the Hachiko development board for the Renesas RZ/A microcontroller, which is an ARM Cortex-A9-based MCU. This is positioned as a low end design board for applications such as door entry phones, barcode scanners and data communication modules.

Read more ►

Pico scopes now run Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Users can save captures for offline analysis, share them with other PicoScope for Windows and PicoScope for Linux users, or export them in text, CSV and Mathworks MATLAB 4 formats. The only additional hardware needed is a USB oscilloscope.

Read more ►

Linux-based NVR offers remote mobile access

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Planet unveiled a Linux-based, 16-channel network video recorder called the NVR-1620, with dual HDD bays, dual displays, and up to 2560 x 1920 resolution.

Taiwan-based Planet has a long track record of making networking and surveillance appliances. Its latest NVR-1620 network video recorder supports 16 IP video channels, and up to 16 devices can be networked for 256 total channels accessible via a central monitoring site. In addition, most mobile platforms, including Android, are supported for remote viewing.

Read more ►

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Brocade Wants to Be Red Hat of OpenDaylight

Brocade wants to have the same relationship with OpenDaylight as Red Hat has with Linux. Read more

Rise of Linux – a hacker’s history

The original code of Linux was written for fun, or in Eric Raymond’s phrase, to ‘scratch the itch’ of Linus Torvalds, and later to satisfy the enthusiasm and programming itch of an assortment of hackers and hobbyists who, for the most part, had grown up in the age of the ZX80 and the BBC Micro, Acorns and Apricots, for which the code was often available – and hackable. For those who spent their childhood or adolescence delving into the home computers of the late Seventies and early Eighties, playing with software was a learning experience, and something to be shared. Linux could be said to have grown out of this ethos as much as it grew out of the free software movement, or the early Nineties culture of Usenet where “if you wrote something neat you posted it to Usenet” and the only proviso that came with the software was that “if the software breaks you get to keep both pieces.” Read more

Lollipop unwrapped: Chromium WebView will update via Google Play

Android 5.0, codenamed Lollipop, has introduced a key change to the WebView component, used by app developers to display HTML 5 content within their apps, making new features more readily available. Read more

Being a Sporadic Overview Of Linux Distribution Release Validation Processes

Our glorious Fedora uses Mediawiki to manage both test cases and test results for manual release validation. This is clearly ludicrous, but works much better than it has any right to. ‘Dress rehearsal’ composes of the entire release media set are built and denoted as Test Composes or Release Candidates, which can be treated interchangably as ‘composes’ for our purposes here. Each compose represents a test event. In the ‘TCMS’ a test event is represented as a set of wiki pages; each wiki page can be referred to as a test type. Each wiki page must contain at least one wiki table with the rows representing a concept I refer to as a unique test or a test instance. There may be multiple tables on a page; usually they will be in separate wiki page sections. Read more