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Hardware

Linux Netbooks: What's on the Menu?

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Linux
Hardware

linuxinsider.com: Linux and netbooks seem to be a well-met pair. Lightweight Linux distros sit comfortably on the shoulders of the mini laptops' compact hardware. Plenty of computer makers are offering models with pre-installed Linux. Here's a snapshot of what's out there.

Acer Aspire One and Fedora 10

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Linux
Hardware

meanderingpassage.com: This past holiday season Netbook computers were a leading seller for Amazon, and thanks to my dear wife I was a lucky recipients of one of those sales. From my own preferences there was just one issue I had to correct…it was running Windows.

Linux Solid-State Drive Benchmarks

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Hardware

phoronix.com: How though does the real-world performance differ between hard disk drives and solid-state drives on Linux? We have run several tests atop Ubuntu on a Samsung netbook with a HDD and SSD.

Alpha 400 MIPS 400MHz 128MB 1GB 7″ Linux Ultralite Notebook

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Linux
Hardware

testfreaks.com: There’s a new little netbook or ultralite notebook floating around out there. This new little netbook is linux based, it’s small, portable, inexpensive and lightweight, sure it’s not going to run Crysis, but if you’re looking for something to play around with then this just might fit the bill.

Graphics shuffle

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Hardware

blogs.gentoo.org: On Christmas Eve, a special present arrived from UPS: the HIS Radeon X1950 Pro I purchased on eBay. For the week prior to Christmas I removed the discrete nVidia 7600GT and ran off the integrated nVidia Geforce 8200 chip in my motherboard. Utter pain!

EMTEC to bring 10-inch Gdium netbook stateside

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Linux
Hardware
  • EMTEC to bring 10-inch Gdium netbook stateside

  • Netbooks: Psion vs. Intel, Round Two
  • Netbooks Aren't Bad, Just Misunderstood
  • Bare Minimum

Intel opens Netbook Linux centre

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Linux
Hardware

computerworlduk.com: A new centre aimed at speeding the development of mobile computing devices around the Linux-based Moblin OS opened in Taipei.

12 handy tips for your new Linux netbook

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Linux
Hardware

techradar.com: The netbook trend has been called something of a Trojan Horse for the spread of Linux; we're not about to disagree. It really is a fully-fledged PC - so check out our tips to help you get the most out of your low-cost laptop.

The Future Of The Netbook?

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Hardware
  • The Future Of The Netbook?

  • What’s the Allure of these Netbooks?
  • Are Netbooks the Future of PCs?
  • Cease and Desist: the netbook war of words
  • MSI Wind

ThinkPad X300 and Linux - first impressions and power consumption issues

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Hardware

blog.gwright.org: Today I got down and installed Ubuntu 8.10 on this new X300, and things went rather smoothly. In terms of things that work, the list is rather good. However, I have noticed a few problems.

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