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Hardware

Acer Aspire One Review

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxhaxor.net: Ever since the first rumors about an Apple tablet computer, and more recently an ultra-portable notebook caught my attention a couple of years ago, I’ve been holding out on upgrading my beloved Sharp Zaurus. Apple still hasn’t made good on the seeds it planted. I’m now a bona fide member of the netbook craze

$98 Linux Laptop

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • $98 Linux Laptop - The HiVision miniNote

  • MSI Wind gets updates
  • Novell SUSE Linux Scores At Big Retailer

Update On The TechCrunch Tablet: Prototype A

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Hardware

techcrunch.com: Update on the TechCrunch Tablet: A humble (and messy) beginning. Prototype A has been built. It’s in a temporary aluminum case that a local sheet metal shop put together for us that’s at least twice as thick as it needs to be.

CTL vows $149 Atom, Linux-based desktop

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

electronista.com: Classmate PC reseller CTL plans to set a new floor for desktops with a nettop that shares the same design philosophy as Intel's portable. The 2go pc nettop will cost as little as $149 thanks to its use of a 1.6GHz Atom processor but desktop-oriented parts.

6 Places to Buy Pre-installed Linux Computers

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxhaxor.net: Gone are the days when the only source of linux distribution was the web. Today, we will look at some of the popular distributors/resellers, who are selling pre-installed linux systems for home users (not servers).

Netbooks free with cellular contract?

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Hardware

linuxdevices.com: LG Electronics announced a netbook that sports a built-in HSPA (high speed packet access) modem, and may be available from carriers in subsidized form. The X110 has a 1.6GHz Atom processor, 10-inch screen, 80GB or 120GB hard drive, 802.11b/g, and a wired Ethernet port.

Stuff That Works With Linux #3 - Huawei USB Modem

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Hardware

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: MOBILE broadband has been getting a huge marketing push in the UK. But all the operators say their products - from USB dongles to PCI Express adaptors - are only for Windows or Mac.

ATI R500: Mesa vs. Catalyst Benchmarking

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Hardware

phoronix.com: With Mesa 7.1 having been released this week and the open-source R600/770 3D support just around the corner, we've taken this opportunity to see how the open-source Mesa 3D stack compares to AMD's monthly-refined Catalyst Linux Suite with the fglrx driver performs for the Radeon X1000 (R500) series.

ASUS' Big Development

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

John C. Dvorak: The most interesting story the media is downplaying is the ASUS announcement that it will have a ROM boot chip on all its motherboards, which will boot Linux instantly on start-up. This development is important, since 90 percent of the time all a user wants to do is surf the Web.

"Green" integrated PC runs Linux

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Hardware

linuxdevices.com: Tangent announced a fanless, Linux-compatible PC that runs on 24 Watts and tucks neatly behind its 17-inch display. The Evergreen 17 is available with a 1GHz Via Eden, 2GB SDRAM, and either a 160GB hard drive or a 64GB solid-state drive (SSD), says Tangent.

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PfSense 2.1.5 Is a Free and Powerful FreeBSD-Based Firewall Operating System

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