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Booksize PC = Good Cheap Alternative Computing

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Hardware In 2007 and 2008 the netbook laptop format made a big splash and continues to do so in 2009. But what about having this mini-sized format in a standalone desktop computer? Is there an option and moreover it is cheap?

Hands on: Neuros LINK, an Ubuntu-based media extender

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Hardware Ars reviews the Neuros LINK, a set-top box that runs the Ubuntu Linux distribution. The LINK brings Web-based streaming media services like Hulu to your TV and can easily be repurposed to run Boxee and other popular Linux media software.

Dell's hybrid laptops: Intel + ARM, Windows + Linux

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Hardware Dell is offering Windows-Linux hybrid laptops that use both Intel and ARM processors. Though the user would never know it.

Sapphire Radeon HD 4670 512MB GDDR4

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Hardware Back in September we reviewed the Sapphire Radeon HD 4670 graphics card that offered 512MB of GDDR3 memory. Sapphire Technology though has now introduced a new version of the Radeon HD 4670 that sports 512MB of GDDR4 memory. Will switching out the GDDR3 for GDDR4 memory have much of an overall impact on this graphics card?

Review: Yoggie Gatekeeper Pro

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Hardware The Yoggie Gatekeeper Pro is a Linux powered mini-computer designed to secure your laptop from any and all forms of network and Internet attack.

The Kindle is a Swindle

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Hardware Amazon's Kindle v2 officially arrived today, and it's a swindle. I have no argument with the item itself, but $400 is a lot of dough to pay for a gadget that will sit gathering dust a couple of weeks after you've purchased it. Amazon customers are already up in arms--and they're right.

Debian Project seeks Hardware Donations

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Hardware The Debian project is looking for sponsors for two new official services: snapshot and data archives. Both services utilize large amounts of data and therefore require a capable machine with a large disk array that provides 10 TB of disk space to start, with the ability to be easily extended. We'd like interested sponsors to contact

Take note - small is beautiful

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Hardware THERE WAS a time when the only way to really be mobile with a computer was with a laptop. Then came what were termed sub-notebooks. But with the rise of the internet, much of the computing power we need has moved to the web, hence the emergence of the netbooks.

Registering your shiny new HP Mini-Note 2133

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lizards.opensuse: So you just got an HP Mini-Note 2133 pre-loaded with SLED 10? Great, right? If you attempt to use YaST to register you copy of SLED on the 2133, you’ll be re-directed to a “special” Novell Customer Center login. It simply refreshes the page when you click submit and sends nothing to Novell.

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More in Tux Machines

ARTIK is the Tizen’s Trojan Horse to dominate the IoT ecosystem

As part of the Forum “Tizen for the Internet of Things” held on September 22 in Moscow, Samsung Electronics has presented a new family of maker boards and modules named ARTIK, in addition to the infrastructure of the operating system Tizen 3.0. Samsung ARTIK’s value proposition, as declared by Samsung, is to reinvent the prototyping process by leveraging world-class data security granted by the company as well as a wide array of tools, both hardware and software, such as the ARTIK Modules and Cloud, formerly known as SmartThings Open Cloud. Read more

today's leftovers

today's howtos

Android Leftovers

  • Google Pixel review: The best Android phone, even if it is a little pricey
    Welcome to the age of Google Hardware. Apparently tired of letting third-party Android OEMs serve as the stewards of Android handsets, Google has become a hardware company. (Again). Earlier this year Google, launched a hardware division with former Motorola President Rick Osterloh at the helm. With the high-ranking title of "Senior Vice President," Osterloh doesn't oversee a side project—his group is on even footing with Android, Search, YouTube, and Ads. The hardware group is so powerful inside Google that it was able to merge Nexus, Pixel, Chromecast, OnHub, ATAP, and Glass into a single business unit. The group's coming out party was October 4, 2016, where it announced Google Home, Google Wifi, a 4K Chromecast, the Daydream VR headset, and the pair of phones we're looking at today: the Google Pixel and Google Pixel XL. The arrival of the Pixel phones marks the apparent death of the Nexus line; Google says that it has "no plans" for future Nexus devices. With the new branding comes a change in strategy, too. The Pixel brand is about making devices that are 100 percent Google, so despite Google's position as the developer of Android, get ready for Google-designed hardware combined with exclusive Google software.
  • Hands-on with the LeEco Le Pro3: services first, Android second
    LeEco’s flagship Le Pro3 smartphone isn’t trying to compete with the Google Pixel, which puts modern Google services in front of a stock Android backdrop. After playing with the Le Pro3 at the company’s U.S. launch event in San Francisco today, I’m left feeling that it’s an easy, low-cost way to get the full experience of LeEco’s applications. There are proprietary LeEco utility tools like the browser, email, calendar, messages, notes, and phone apps, along with bloatware like Yahoo Weather, but mostly the Pro3 is a means of distribution for the LeEco apps, like Live, LeVidi, and Le. There is also a standard-issue My LeEco app for managing services like EcoPass membership. Under it all is the EUI custom user interface. If you swipe left from the home screen, you see videos that LeEco recommends you watch — not Google Now.
  • Report: Google reaches agreement with CBS for 'Unplugged' web TV service - Fox and Disney may follow