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Hardware

ASUS' Big Development

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

John C. Dvorak: The most interesting story the media is downplaying is the ASUS announcement that it will have a ROM boot chip on all its motherboards, which will boot Linux instantly on start-up. This development is important, since 90 percent of the time all a user wants to do is surf the Web.

"Green" integrated PC runs Linux

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Hardware

linuxdevices.com: Tangent announced a fanless, Linux-compatible PC that runs on 24 Watts and tucks neatly behind its 17-inch display. The Evergreen 17 is available with a 1GHz Via Eden, 2GB SDRAM, and either a 160GB hard drive or a 64GB solid-state drive (SSD), says Tangent.

ASUS Eee PC 901

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

phoronix.com: Last year ASUS had christened the Eee PC as a cost-effective but well built sub-notebook (or now known as a "netbook") that ended up being extremely popular with more people than just computer enthusiasts. In this article we are providing our first look at the Eee PC 901 along with a few bits of information and sharing some of our plans for the Eee Linux testing in the near future.

SUSE-Linux-on-IBM-loaned mainframe becomes teaching ground

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

techtarget.com: While most computer science students learn skills on x86 servers, their counterparts at the University of Arkansas will now get hands-on experience on a new IBMsystem z900 running Novell SUSE Linux Enterprise.

A modest Linux USB suggestion

Filed under
Hardware

practical-tech.com: Did you know that there are two basic kinds of USB 2.0 drives? I didn’t. But, now thanks to Robert L. Scheier’s article, Not all USB drives are created equal, I now know that are significant differences between drives. And, in particular those differences matter a lot to live USB capable Linux distributions like Fedora 9.

Super Micro C2SEA G45

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Hardware

phoronix.com: This time around we have our hands on the Super Micro C2SEA, which is a desktop motherboard that uses the Intel G45 Chipset and provides integrated GMA X4500 HD graphics.

Attack of the GNU/Linux Ultraportables, Part 2

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Glyn Moody: As I noted the other day, ultraportables are not only hot, but they've changed the dynamics of the entire desktop sector. With the imminent arrival of the Dell effort in this sector, we've clearly reached a significant milestone, but that doesn't mean that things are going to get boring. Here's what marks the start of phase 2:

New Linux-powered Kindle on its way

Filed under
Hardware

practical-tech.com: The Kindle, Amazon’s Linux-powered electronic paper book will have at least one new version out for the 2008 holiday season. The second generation Kindle is expected to have both an improved user-interface and a larger screen.

Dell/Ubuntu Inspiron 1525 Review

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

marksitblog.blogspot: I recently purchased a new Dell 1525 laptop running Ubuntu 8.04. I've been in need of a new laptop for about a year, and decided to take the plunge and see how good a Linux based laptop from Dell really is.

Netbook Prices Are Now Falling

Filed under
Hardware

blogs.nytimes: Personal computer maker Acer said Friday morning it is cutting the price of its Aspire “netbook” to $349 from $399. It’s cutting the price of another netbook, the Linpus Linux Lite, to $329 from $379. None too soon.

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Edubuntu Vs UberStudent: Return To College With The Best Linux Distro

Importantly, there are a handful of programs that are on Edubuntu that UberStudent doesn’t have, such as KAlgebra, Kazium, KGeography, and Marble. Instead, UberStudent has a smaller collection of applications but it does include some useful items when it comes to writing papers that Edubuntu does not have. So ultimately, Edubuntu includes more programs that are information-heavy, while UberStudent includes more tools that can aid students in their studies but doesn’t directly give them any sort of information. Read more

Zotac Nvidia Jetson TK1 review

The Jetson TK1, Nvidia’s first development board to be marketed at the general public, has taken a circuitous route to our shores. Unveiled at the company’s Graphics Technology Conference earlier this year, the board launched in the US at a headline-grabbing price of $192 but its international release was hampered by export regulations. Zotac, already an Nvidia partner for its graphics hardware, volunteered to sort things out and has partnered with Maplin to bring the board to the UK. In doing so, however, the price has become a little muddled. $192 – a clever dollar per GPU core – has become £199.99. Compared to Maplin’s other single-board computer, the sub-£30 Raspberry Pi, it’s a high-end item that could find itself priced out of the reach of the company’s usual customers. Read more

New Human Interface Guidelines for GNOME and GTK+

I’ve recently been hard at work on a new and updated version of the GNOME Human Interface Guidelines, and am pleased to announce that this will be ready for the upcoming 3.14 release. Over recent years, application design has evolved a huge amount. The web and native applications have become increasingly similar, and new design patterns have become the norm. During that period, those of us in the GNOME Design Team have worked with developers to expand the range of GTK+’s capabilities, and the result is a much more modern toolkit. Read more