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KDE4 performance on NVidia 8600GT: problem solved by bying ATI

Filed under
KDE
Hardware

adymo.blogspot: I've been running KDE4 desktop since May and I've constantly suffered from poor desktop performance and various graphics card related problems. Now I've solved those problems:

Next netbook - thinner, cheaper, better, Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

blogs.the451group: I recently had a very interesting talk with Freescale’s Glen Burchers, director of global consumer marketing, regarding netbooks, where Linux stands with this emerging form factor and what we can expect to see as everybody and their grandma pushes innovation of these devices.

Samung NC10 Netbook

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

phoronix.com: It seems that each and every week there are new netbooks that are introduced, but there are not many differences between most models. However, one of the latest companies to join the netbook bandwagon here in the United States has been Samsung with the introduction of the NC10. Is there anything special about it?

Also: My First Netbook Experience

Blackberry tethering (and more) on Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
MDV
SUSE
Ubuntu

This article explains how to tether a Blackberry phone - use it as a modem, via a USB cable - in Linux, covering Mandriva, Ubuntu, OpenSUSE and Fedora. It also mentions some other things that the Barry project lets you do with your Blackberry.

Sylvania Netbook With Ubuntu: A Good Mix

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

linuxinsider.com: Sylvania's G Netbook Meso offers a nice-looking screen and plenty of ports -- you get three USBs as well as a VGA. The available Ubuntu Netbook Remix OS will give you the option to effortless switch between two GUI styles.

AMD Shanghai Opteron CPUs On Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

phoronix.com: Last quarter AMD introduced their "Shanghai" Opteron processors that join the ranks of Intel's Harpertown Xeon CPUs that are 45nm quad-core server/workstation parts. Initial reviews of these new AMD Opteron processors have been very positive, but how do these chips perform with Linux?

Linux Netbooks: What's on the Menu?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxinsider.com: Linux and netbooks seem to be a well-met pair. Lightweight Linux distros sit comfortably on the shoulders of the mini laptops' compact hardware. Plenty of computer makers are offering models with pre-installed Linux. Here's a snapshot of what's out there.

Acer Aspire One and Fedora 10

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

meanderingpassage.com: This past holiday season Netbook computers were a leading seller for Amazon, and thanks to my dear wife I was a lucky recipients of one of those sales. From my own preferences there was just one issue I had to correct…it was running Windows.

Linux Solid-State Drive Benchmarks

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: How though does the real-world performance differ between hard disk drives and solid-state drives on Linux? We have run several tests atop Ubuntu on a Samsung netbook with a HDD and SSD.

Alpha 400 MIPS 400MHz 128MB 1GB 7″ Linux Ultralite Notebook

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

testfreaks.com: There’s a new little netbook or ultralite notebook floating around out there. This new little netbook is linux based, it’s small, portable, inexpensive and lightweight, sure it’s not going to run Crysis, but if you’re looking for something to play around with then this just might fit the bill.

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics

  • Linux kernel bug delivers corrupt TCP/IP data to Mesos, Kubernetes, Docker containers
    The Linux Kernel has a bug that causes containers that use veth devices for network routing (such as Docker on IPv6, Kubernetes, Google Container Engine, and Mesos) to not check TCP checksums. This results in applications incorrectly receiving corrupt data in a number of situations, such as with bad networking hardware. The bug dates back at least three years and is present in kernels as far back as we’ve tested. Our patch has been reviewed and accepted into the kernel, and is currently being backported to -stable releases back to 3.14 in different distributions (such as Suse, and Canonical). If you use containers in your setup, I recommend you apply this patch or deploy a kernel with this patch when it becomes available. Note: Docker’s default NAT networking is not affected and, in practice, Google Container Engine is likely protected from hardware errors by its virtualized network.
  • Performance problems
    Just over a year ago I implemented an optimization to the SPI core code in Linux that avoids some needless context switches to a worker thread in the main data path that most clients use. This was really nice, it was simple to do but saved a bunch of work for most drivers using SPI and made things noticeably faster. The code got merged in v4.0 and that was that, I kept on kicking a few more ideas for optimizations in this area around but that was that until the past month.
  • Compute Shader Code Begins Landing For Gallium3D
    Samuel Pitoiset began pushing his Gallium3D Mesa state tracker changes this morning for supporting compute shaders via the GL_ARB_compute_shader extension. Before getting too excited, the hardware drivers haven't yet implemented the support. It was back in December that core Mesa received its treatment for compute shader support and came with Intel's i965 driver implementing CS.
  • Libav Finally Lands VDPAU Support For Accelerated HEVC Decoding
    While FFmpeg has offered hardware-accelerated HEVC decoding using NVIDIA's VDPAU API since last summer, this support for the FFmpeg-forked libav landed just today. In June was when FFmpeg added support to its libavcodec for handling HEVC/H.265 video decoding via NVIDIA's Video Decode and Presentation API for Unix interface. Around that same time, developer Philip Langdale who had done the FFmpeg patch, also submitted the patch for Libav for decoding HEVC content through VDPAU where supported.

Unixstickers, Linux goes to Washington, Why Linux?

  • Unixstickers sent me a package!
    There's an old, popular saying, beware geeks bearing gifts. But in this case, I was pleased to see an email in my inbox, from unixstickers.com, asking me if I was interested in reviewing their products. I said ye, and a quick few days later, there was a surprise courier-delivered envelope waiting for me in the post. Coincidentally - or not - the whole thing happened close enough to the 2015 end-of-the-year holidays to classify as poetic justice. On a slightly more serious note, Unixstickers is a company shipping T-shirts, hoodies, mugs, posters, pins, and stickers to UNIX and Linux aficionados worldwide. Having been identified one and acquired on the company's PR radar, I am now doing a first-of-a-kind Dedoimedo non-technical technical review of merchandise related to our favorite software. So not sure how it's gonna work out, but let's see.
  • Linux goes to Washington: How the White House/Linux Foundation collaboration will work
    No doubt by now you've heard about the Obama Administration's newly announced Cybersecurity National Action Plan (CNAP). You can read more about it on CIO.com here and here. But what you may not know is that the White House is actively working with the Linux and open source community for CNAP. In a blog post Jim Zemlin, the executive director of the Linux Foundation said, “In the proposal, the White House announced collaboration with The Linux Foundation’s Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII) to better secure Internet 'utilities' such as open-source software, protocols and standards.”
  • Why Linux?
    Linux may inspire you to think of coders hunched over their desks (that are littered with Mountain Dew cans) while looking at lines of codes, faintly lit by the yellow glow of old CRT monitors. Maybe Linux sounds like some kind of a wild cat and you have never heard the term before. Maybe you have use it every day. It is an operating system loved by a few and misrepresented to many.

RebeccaBlackOS 2016-02-08 Review. Why? Because it’s Friday.

These are the types of problems found in an independent distro build from scratch. I cannot understand how a system built on Debian could be this buggy and apparently have zero VM support which Debian comes with by default. I can take some solace in the fact that it was built by one person and that one person is a Rebecca Black fan but as far as a Linux Distribution is concerned there is not much here. Some could say “Well its not supposed to be taken as a serious Distribution.” True except it is listed and kept up with on DistroWatch therefor it should be held as a system ready distribution especially when it was not released as a beta or an RC. If this distribution is ever going to be considered a real platform it has a long way to go. I give it about as many thumbs down as the Rebecca Black Friday video. Read more

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