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Hardware

Hardware With Linux: OrangeCrab, Nexcom’s and Arbor’s Devices

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Hardware
  • ULX3S Education Board is Powered by Lattice Semi ECP5 FPGA & ESP32 WiFi/BLE Module

    A few days ago, we covered the KiCAD designed OrangeCrab open-source hardware board powered by a Lattice Semi ECP5 FPGA, and compliant with Adafruit Feather form factor.

    It’s turned out there’s another Lattice Semi ECP5 FPGA board that’s also designed with KiCAD and open source hardware. Radiona ULX3S differs are it’s larger and exposes more I/Os since it was specifically designed to meet the meets of the digital logic course at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing (FER) of the University of Zagreb in Croatia.

  • Apollo Lake industrial computer is only 26mm tall

    Nexcom’s compact, rugged “NISE 51” industrial computer runs Linux or Windows on a dual-core Apollo Lake Celeron with a pair each of GbE, USB 3.0, USB 2.0, M.2, and RS232 plus RS422/485, DP, and mini-PCIe.

    Nexcom has announced an “affordable” and “cost effective” computer for smart factory and M2M applications that measures a trim 162 x 150 x 26mm. The rugged NISE 51 runs Linux 4.1 or Windows 10 IoT Enterprise on an up to 2.4GHz, dual-core Celeron N3550 from Intel’s Apollo Lake generation.

  • Coffee Lake signage player supports triple 4K displays

    Arbor’s fanless, rugged ”ELIT-1930” signage player runs Linux or Windows on an 8th Gen Coffee Lake-S CPU with up to 32GB DDR4, triple 4K displays, 2x GbE, 3x COM, 4x USB 3.1, and 3x M.2.

    Arbor Technology announced a new member of its ELIT series of digital signage systems equipped with Intel’s 8th Gen Coffee Lake S-series Core processors with 35W TDPs. The ELIT-1930 runs Linux 4.x or Windows 10 IoT on CPUs including the 6x core/12x thread Core i7-8700T clocked at 2.4GHz/4GHz. There’s also a hexa-core i5-8500T and quad-core i3-8100T, both of which are single threaded. The system has an Intel Q370 chipset and Intel UHD Graphics 630.

2019 System76 Gazelle Laptop Review and Latest News From System76

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GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • 2019 System76 Gazelle Laptop Review
  • System76: It’s Time for an August News Update!

    When Back to School season threatened to overpower outdated hardware, it was up to us to help students and teachers succeed in the classroom. As a result, we began the month of August with our Back to School Sale! Until September 10th, those looking to upgrade their hardware can save on computers and increase their discounts as they upgrade?up to $1510 on desktops and up to $370 on laptops.

    In other news, we?ve recently announced some new hardware and features! Read on for more about the Adder WS, Pop!_OS, and the new Firmware Manager, as well as information about our attendance at Open Source Firmware Conference.

SparkFun continues to innovate thanks to open source hardware

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Hardware
OSS

When SparkFun Electronics founder and CEO Nathan Seidle was an engineering student at the University of Colorado, he was taught, "Real engineers come up with an idea and patent that idea." However, his experience with SparkFun, which he founded from his college apartment in 2003, is quite the opposite.

All 600 "SparkFun original" components are for sale on the site in addition to 1000+ resell products. All of the company's schematics and code are licensed under CC BY-SA, with some firmware CC0, and its design files are available on public GitHub repos. In addition, some of the company's designs are Open Source Hardware Association (OSHWA) certified.

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Gateworks GW5913 Compact NXP i.MX 6 SBC Supports PoE, GPS and 4G LTE Cellular Connectivity

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Linux
Hardware

The company provides OpenWrt and Ubuntu Board Support Packages (BSP) for the board, and documentation is publicly available in the Wiki. The board is designed for small embedded applications such as IoT Gateways, Man-Portable Units (MPUs), Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), digital signage, and robotics.

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$5 Longan Nano GD32V RISC-V Development Board Comes with LCD Display and Enclosure

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Hardware

There’s been some exciting news about RISC-V microcontrollers recently with Gigadevice announcing GD32V, one of the first RISC-V general-purpose microcontrollers, which outperforms its Arm Cortex-M3 equivalent in terms of performance and power consumption.

The company also announced some development boards, but they are not quite that easy to purchase being listed on Tmall website in China. The good news is that Sipeed has introduced Longan Nano development board powered by GD32VF103CBT6 microcontroller, and it’s up for sale on Seeed Studio for $4.9.

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Devices/Embedded: ClearCube, UP-Squared and More

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Hardware
  • Thin client powers up with Raspberry Pi 4

    ClearCube announced a “C4Pi Thin Client” built around the Raspberry Pi 4 that runs Stratodesk’s Linux-based Cloud Desktop OS with support for Citrix HDX, VMWare, and Microsoft VDI stacks.

    In conjunction with this week’s VMWorld 2019 conference in San Francisco, ClearCube has announced the imminent release of a thin client based on the Raspberry Pi 4 Model B. The C4Pi Thin Client updates its C3xPi Thin Client, which is built around the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+.

  • UP Squared Is A Very Capable Intel SBC For Makers & IoT

    After learning of the UP-Squared SBC maker board this summer when this Intel Apollolake single board computer was added to Coreboot, the company sent over a review sample and for the past number of weeks have been putting this mini board through its paces and performance tests.

  • A Linux-to-Cloud IoT Solution the Microsoft Way

Open Hardware: OrangeCrab, RISC-V, TinyGo and More

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Hardware
OSS

GNOME Firmware Updater

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Hardware
GNOME

GNOME Firmware Updater was designed in the style of a GNOME Control Center panel, and all the code is written in a way to make a port very simple indeed if that’s what we actually want. At the moment it’s a seporate project and binary, as we’re still prototyping the UI and working out what kind of UX we want from a power user tool. It’s mostly complete and a few weeks away from it’s first release. When it does get an official release, I’ll be sure to upload it to Flathub to make it easy for the world to install. If this sounds interesting to you the code is here. I don’t have a huge amount of time to dedicate to this power user tool, but please open pull requests or issues if there’s something you’d like to see fixed.

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Also: GNOME Firmware Updater Is A New UI For Managing Firmware On Linux By Power Users

Open Hardware and Devices: ESP32, Arduino, RISC-V and Embedded Linux

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Android
Linux
Hardware
  • ESP32-MeshKit is a Development Kit for ESP32 Mesh Networking
  • Getting Started with ANAVI Gas Detector Starter Kit and Home Assistant
  • What Is PWM in Arduino

    Pulse width modulation (PWM) is a widely-used concept in physics, electronics and telecommunications. It is defined as a form of signal modulation to derive analog waveforms from digital inputs.

    In Arduino applications, PWM is useful in varying the intensity of a signal such as the brightness of an LED diode, the ping time of sensors or the power delivery of servomotors.

  • RISC-V Bases and Extensions Explained

    The other day we reported about GigaDevice GD32V general-purpose 32-bit RISC-V microcontroller, and one of the commenters asked whether it was rv32imac or rv32emac..

  • Innocomm Unveils MediaTek i300/i500 SoMs for IoT and AI Applications

    Just announced by Innocomm are the SB30 and the SB50 SoMs carrying the MediaTek i300 and i500 SoC’s, and running either Linux or Android. The rundown on the systems is the MediaTek AIoT processor series has been out for some time, and we reported on the latest SoC in the MediaTek i700 article last July.

  • Logic Supply Announces Karbon 700 Rugged Linux PC With Core / Xeon CPU Options

    Earlier this summer we checked out the Logic Supply Karbon 300 as a well-built and very durable Linux-friendly PC for low-power environments. That Karbon 300 came equipped with a low-power Apollo Lake Atom processor while today the company announced the Karbon 700 with higher-wattage Core and Xeon CPU options for high performance IoT / edge computing.

    The Karbon 700 series is built similarly well to the Karbon 300 series and a similar (but slightly larger) form factor while now being able to handle 35 Watt / 65 Watt Core CPUs or up to 80 Watt Xeon E "Coffeelake" processors.

Floppy Disks vs 21st Century Linux

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

Recent headlines proclaim the imminent demise of support for the venerable floppy disk drive in the Linux kernel. My stomach churned and my heart gave a flutter or two. I have been in this business quite a few years and my collection of floppy disks goes back to 8-inchers. “Not again!” I thought.

Fortunately, further research indicated that the headlines overstated the situation somewhat. All floppy support isn't going away—just support for drives connected to dedicated floppy controllers. That USB drive you bought to bring diskette read/write capability to newer computers uses a different support mechanism and will continue to be supported—for now. All the same, it seemed like now was a good time to do something with all these diskettes.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming: GCC, RcppEigen and Python

  • Introduce a new GCC option, --record-gcc-command-line
    I would like to propose the following patches which introduce a compile option --record-gcc-command-line. When passed to gcc, it saves the command line option into the produced object file. The option makes it trivial to trace back how a file was compiled and by which version of the gcc. It helps with debugging, reproducing bugs and repeating the build process.
    
    This option is similar to -frecord-gcc-switches. However, they have three fundamental differences: Firstly, -frecord-gcc-switches saves the internal state after the argv is processed and passed by the driver. As opposed to that, --record-gcc-command-line saves the command-line as received by the driver. Secondly, -frecord-gcc-switches saves the switches as separate entries into a mergeable string section. Therefore, the entries belonging to different object files get mixed up after being linked. The new --record-gcc-command-line, on the other hand, creates one entry per invocation. By doing so, it makes it clear which options were used together in a single gcc invocation. Lastly, --record-gcc-command-line also adds the version of the gcc into this single entry to make it clear which version of gcc was called with any given command line. This is useful in cases where .comment section reports multiple versions.
    
    While there are also similarities between the implementations of these two options, they are completely independent. These commands can be used separately or together without issues. I used the same section that -frecord-gcc-switches uses on purpose. I could not use the name -frecord-gcc-command-line for this option; because of a {f*} in the specs, which forwards all options starting with -f to cc1/cc1plus as is. This is not we want for this option. We would like to append it a filename as well to pass the argv of the driver to child processes.
    
    This functionality operates as the following: It saves gcc's argv into a temporary file, and passes --record-gcc-command-line <tempfilename> to cc1 or cc1plus. The functionality of the backend is implemented via a hook. This patch includes an example implementation of the hook for elf targets: elf_record_gcc_command_line function. This function reads the given file and writes gcc's version and the command line into a mergeable string section, .GCC.command.line.
    
    
  • GCC Developers Discuss New Option For Recording Compiler Flags / Details In Binaries

    GCC developers recently have been discussing a new proposal over an option for preserving the command-line flags/options used when building a binary as well as the associated compiler version. The proposal sent out last week was over a --record-gcc-command-line option to save the compiler options into the produced object file. The proposal is in the name of helping debugging, reproducing bugs, and repeating build process. There is already a -frecord-gcc-switches option that is somewhat similar in behavior but with key differences as explained in the proposal.

  • RcppEigen 0.3.3.7.0

    A new minor release 0.3.3.7.0 of RcppEigen arrived on CRAN today (and just went to Debian too) bringing support for Eigen 3.3.7 to R. This release comes almost a year after the previous minor release 0.3.3.5.0. Besides the upgrade to the new upstream version, it brings a few accumulated polishes to the some helper and setup functions, and switches to the very nice tinytest package for unit tests; see below for the full list. As before, we carry a few required changes to Eigen in a diff.

  • “Higher Performance Python” at PyDataCambridge 2019

    I’ve had the pleasure of speaking at the first PyDataCambridge conference (2019), this is the second PyData conference in the UK after PyDataLondon (which colleagues and I co-founded 6 years back). I’m super proud to see PyData spread to 6 regional meetups and now 2 UK conferences.

today's howtos

Games: Baba, Dicey Dungeons, Factorio and Enabling GameMode

  • Excellent rule-changing puzzle game Baba Is You is getting an official level editor

    Baba Is You, the truly excellent puzzle game where you have to break the rules of each level to beat them is getting a big update soon. See Also: previous thoughts on it here. How do you break these rules? Well, on each level there's logic blocks you can push around to change everything. Turn yourself into a rock, a jellyfish, make it so touching a wall wins instead of a flag you can't access and all kinds of really crazy things it becomes quite hilarious.

  • Dicey Dungeons outsold Terry Cavanagh's last two Steam games in the first month

    Terry Cavanagh, the indie developer behind VVVVVV, Super Hexagon and the latest Dicey Dungeons has a new blog post out talking about how well Dicey Dungeons has done and what's to come next. Leading up to the release, Cavanagh was doing a blog post each day for seven days. This latest post from yesterday then, is long overdue considering Dicey Dungeons launched in August.

  • Factorio is leaving Early Access in September next year

    As a result of the team behind Factorio feeling like it's going on for too long, they've now set a proper release date. In their latest Friday Facts update, they mentioned how their "when it's done" approach has served them well to create a high-quality game "but if we continued this way, we would be doing it basically forever". Part of the issue is that they want to work on new features and add content, instead of constant polishing. So they're setting a date publicly now "so we have to stick with it". With that in mind, it's going to leave Early Access on September 25, 2020. Development is not ending once they hit the big 1.0, they also don't want to say it's 100% finished either. Like a lot of games, as long as the money keeps coming in they will likely keep adding to it.

  • Enabling GameMode on Linux for best gaming performance

Red Hat Enterprise Linux and CentOS Now Patched Against Latest Intel CPU Flaws

After responding to the latest security vulnerabilities affecting Intel CPU microarchitectures, Red Hat has released new Linux kernel security updates for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 operating systems to address the well-known ZombieLoad v2 flaw and other issues. The CentOS community also ported the updates for their CentOS Linux 6 and CentOS Linux 7 systems. The security vulnerabilities patched in this new Linux kernel security update are Machine Check Error on Page Size Change (IFU) (CVE-2018-12207), TSX Transaction Asynchronous Abort (TAA) (CVE-2019-11135), Intel GPU Denial Of Service while accessing MMIO in lower power state (CVE-2019-0154), and Intel GPU blitter manipulation that allows for arbitrary kernel memory write (CVE-2019-0155). Read more