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Hardware

OCZ Agility SATA 2.0 SSD 120GB

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Hardware

phoronix.com: OCZ Technology has introduced the Agility SATA 2.0 Solid-State Drives. The Agility is designed to fill OCZ's mainstream SSD offerings with models up to 120GB in size, MLC flash memory, 64MB cache, and slightly better prices. In this review we are testing out the OCZ Agility 120GB Serial ATA 2.0 SSD under Ubuntu Linux.

Buying or Selling a Linux PC?

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Hardware

prlog.org: Turn your computer into a open source computer using Linux or BSD and sell it on Buntfu.com for FREE!

AMD FirePro V8750 2GB

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Hardware

phoronix.com: We reviewed the FirePro V8700 1GB workstation graphics card back in March, but AMD has now introduced its evolutionary successor to this ultra high-end product, and that is the ATI FirePro V8750 2GB.

Giving ATI a second glance

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Hardware

zdnet.com.au/blogs: For those of us running Linux desktops, a graphics card decision can make or break a system in ways no commercial OS user can fathom.

Five Best Linux HTPC Motherboards

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Hardware

linuxtech.net: Are you planning to build a Linux HTPC front-end or a stand-alone Linux HTPC, but are you unsure which motherboards would be best suited? Well look no further.

Open source "touch book" shipping worldwide

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Hardware

apcmag.com: A new open source netbook has separate tablet and keyboard sections and is shipping for $US399 globally.

Why I built a Ubuntu PC out of an Old Carpet Cleaner

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Hardware
Ubuntu

networkworld.com: PC cases come in many form factors, but they're all basically boxes that lack personality. This doesn't have to be the case (pun intended), as my Carpet Cleaner PC very well proves. Yes, this is a working Ubuntu PC built out of an old Bissell Carpet Machine.

Dell’s Inspiron 15n With Ubuntu

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Hardware
Ubuntu

itnewstoday.com: I decided to get a Dell. Not just any Dell, an Ubuntu Dell. I ended up with an Inspiron 15n, and I thought I would take the time to write up a quick blog about it.

Fit-PC2 review: The world’s smallest desktop PC

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Hardware
Ubuntu

roytanck.com: The Fit-PC2 is the world’s smallest fully functional desktop PC. It’s about 1/4 the volume of a Mac Mini, and it still has all the necessary connections and features to be used as a home or office computer.

Will Smartbooks Replace Netbooks?

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Hardware

guardian.co.uk: Could netbooks be replaced by smartbooks? Yes. But will they? Maybe. The general idea is to run smartphone software such as Google's Linux-based Android and Microsoft's Windows CE (AKA Windows Mobile) on portable computers with 7in-10in screens.

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