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Hardware

Remember SplashTop? Here's An Update On Them

Filed under
Hardware
Software

phoronix.com: Do you remember SplashTop? It's the instant-on Linux environment that was originally embedded into select ASUS motherboards three years ago. So what has DeviceVM and their SplashTop achieved this year?

Mixed Feelings Over The PSCNV Nouveau Driver Fork

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Hardware
Software

phoronix.com: Three days ago we passed along the latest information on the PSCNV driver, which is a fork of the open-source Nouveau driver for NVIDIA graphics cards. For those that had not read our prior article on the PSCNV driver, it's a fork largely of Nouveau's kernel DRM driver.

China has the top supercomputer in the world, but it still runs Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

blogs.computerworld: If you want a really, really fast computer, there are all kind of ways to build the hardware architecture, but one thing that almost all of them have in common is that they run Linux.

The VAR Guy Review: Netgear Wireless Management System

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Hardware

thevarguy.com: Netgear was kind enough to send me their ProSafe WMS5316 Wireless Management System (Router) and ProSafe WNDAP350 Access Points for review. Any SMB or even branch office might be interested in this feature-packed solution.

System 76 Starling Netbook Review

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Hardware
Ubuntu

ghacks.net: I’ve had the pleasure of trying out plenty of netbook hardware. After plenty of use on this machine, I thought I should report back on the hardware and the OS so that anyone looking for a new netbook might be swayed to the System 76 side.

Linux Netbook Review: ZaReason Terra HD Netbook

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Hardware
Ubuntu

geardiary.com: It’s been a couple of years since I reviewed a laptop from ZaReason, the UltraLap SR. Now I’m reviewing something a bit smaller — the ZaReason Terra HD.

More reasons to learn from old computers

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Hardware

kmandla.wordpress: When someone wants to learn Linux, or at least try it out, I don’t recommend they go buy a new computer. I suggest they find a 4- or 5-year-old laptop, and learn the ropes that way.

Holy Crap! You Can Use XvMC With ATI Gallium3D

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Hardware
Software

phoronix.com: This support hasn't yet perfected, but the first few frames of the video playback may be buggy and on some tries the initialization will fail, but based upon the speed König is going, this is amazing progress.

Old hardware a handicap? Au contraire!

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Linux
Hardware

kmandla.wordpress: I spat out my metaphorical coffee this morning, when I read this line, in regard to a 1.7Ghz Athlon with 256Mb and a 60Gb hard drive.

Belkin's Connect N150 Wifi Router is Linux-Friendly

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Hardware

acrossad.org: Yesterday, I stopped by my local Walmart to buy a wireless router for my network. I wanted something small with good performance, a good price, and compatible with GNU/Linux. As I searched the computer electronics aisle, I saw the little white and yellow box containing the Belkin Connect N150.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux panel PC offers IP69K protection against jet spray

TechNexion has launched a 10.1 inch, 1280 x 800 capacitive touch panel PC that runs Linux or Android on an i.MX6, and offers IP69K protection. TechNexion, which has long been a provider of COMs and SBCs based on Freescale/NXP i.MX SoCs, also sells a line of Linux- and Android-friendly i.MX6, i.MX6UL, and i.MX7 based panel PCs. The latest is a 10.1 inch TWP-1010-IMX6 model that shares many of the same features of its 15.6-inch TWP-1560-IMX6 sibling, including NXP’s i.MX6 SoC, M12 connectors, and a SUS 304 stainless steel case with an IP69K water- and dust-proofing certification. Read more Also: Mongoose OS for IoT prototyping

10 Open Source Skills, Data Analysis Skills and Programming Languages

  • 10 Open Source Skills That Can Lead to Higher Pay
    Last month, The Linux Foundation and the online job board Dice released the results of a survey about open source hiring. It found that 67 percent of managers expected their hiring of open source professionals to increase more than their hiring of other types of IT workers. In addition, 42 percent of managers surveyed said they need to hire more open source talent because they were increasing their use of open source technologies, and 30 said open source was becoming core to their business. A vast majority — 89 percent — of hiring managers said that they were finding it difficult to find the open source talent they need to fill positions.
  • If you want to upgrade your data analysis skills, which programming language should you learn?
    For a growing number of people, data analysis is a central part of their job. Increased data availability, more powerful computing, and an emphasis on analytics-driven decision in business has made it a heyday for data science. According to a report from IBM, in 2015 there were 2.35 million openings for data analytics jobs in the US. It estimates that number will rise to 2.72 million by 2020. A significant share of people who crunch numbers for a living use Microsoft Excel or other spreadsheet programs like Google Sheets. Others use proprietary statistical software like SAS, Stata, or SPSS that they often first learned in school.
  • std::bind
    In digging through the ASIO C++ library examples, I came across an actual use of std::bind. Its entry in cppreference seemed like buzzword salad, so I never previously had paid it any attention.

Visual revamp of GNOME To Do

I’m a fan of productivity. It is not a coincidence that I’m the maintainer of Calendar and To Do. And even though I’m not a power user, I’m a heavy user of productivity applications. For some time now, I’m finding the overall experience of GNOME To Do clumsy and far from ideal. Recently, I received a thank you email from a fellow user, and I asked they what they think that could be improved. It was not a surprise when they said To Do’s interface is clumsy too. Read more

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