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Hardware

Stuff That Works With Linux #4

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Hardware

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: Given that the majority of my digital files include nothing more than MP3s and family photographs, I'm fairly relaxed about how I secure the digital data I carry around with me. But if you're used to carrying sensitive material, whether personal or professional, then I have just the device for you - the iStorage DiskGenie.

ECS NVIDIA GeForce GT 240 512MB

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Hardware

phoronix.com: A month after NVIDIA launched the GeForce GT 220 graphics card they rolled out the GeForce GT 240, to further fill the performance void between the GT216-based GT 220 and the GeForce GTS 250 that had been around since March. We finally have our hands on a GeForce GT 240 graphics card from the folks over at ECS Elitegroup to see how this GT215 graphics card performs under Linux.

The Open-PC: one step closer to open-hardware

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Hardware

At the Gran Canaria Open Desktop Summit in July 2009, the Open-PC project was announced. The statement said the project aimed to “cooperatively design a Free Software based computer by and for the community”. Further this PC would use only hardware for which there are free software drivers available. This would be a PC with the minimal compromise required for running a free desktop. In January 2010 the project announced the launch of its first product.

Read the full article at Free Software Magazine.

For those about to Rock - Gentoo-based electronic guitar

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Linux
Gentoo
Hardware

geek.com: This crazy guitar is actually an open source MIDI system using a sexy touchscreen with multi-touch and reactive fretboard. The result? Called the Misa Digital he fretboard has 144 note buttons, runs Gentoo Linux and, friends, has an Ethernet port with SSH server. Now you can truly hack the Gibson.

Linux and USB 3.0

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Linux
Hardware

linuxplanet.com: The newest, fast interface, USB 3.0, is finally out, but only one operating system has native support for it: Linux.

Why aren’t Linux phones using SyncML?

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Hardware

There’s one thing about the Nokia N900’s Debian-based Maemo OS that I find bewildering and infuriating at the same time. It’s the lack of full support for SyncML — and in its place, Microsoft Exchange.

ASRock ION 330HT-BD Blu-ray NetTop

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Linux
Hardware

phoronix.com: This new nettop computer, which we are reviewing today under Linux, comes complete with a Blu-ray player along with 802.11 g/n WiFi, EuP 2.0 certification, and an MCE remote controller.

Business Netbook: HP Mini 5102 With SUSE Linux

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Hardware
SUSE

thevarguy.com: Amid the pomp and circumstance of tablets and hybrid netbooks from CES 2010, there’s a few notable introductions that slipped under the radar. The HP Mini 5102 — backed by a SUSE Linux option — is one of those devices.

Another day, another SUSE/Moblin Linux netbook

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Hardware
SUSE

blogs.computerworld.com: Shame on me, I missed that during last week's CES (Consumer Electronics Show), MSI wasn't the only company to announce the release of a SUSE/Moblin Linux-powered netbook. Samsung also announced that they'll be releasing this Linux mix on its N127 netbook.

HP Pavillion dm1-1020ez

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Linux
Hardware

zdnet.co.uk/blog: Well, I've done it again. Bought another sub-notebook. So far I have installed Ubuntu 9.10 (standard and UNR), openSuSE 11.2, Mandriva One 2010.0 and Linux Mint 8.

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More in Tux Machines

Android/Google Leftovers

3 open source alternatives to Office 365

It can be hard to get away from working and collaborating on the web. Doing that is incredibly convenient: as long as you have an internet connection, you can easily work and share from just about anywhere, on just about any device. The main problem with most web-based office suites—like Google Drive, Zoho Office, and Office365—is that they're closed source. Your data also exists at the whim of large corporations. I'm sure you've heard numerous stories of, say, Google locking or removing accounts without warning. If that happens to you, you lose what's yours. So what's an open source advocate who wants to work with web applications to do? You turn to an open source alternative, of course. Let's take a look at three of them. Read more

Hackable voice-controlled speaker and IoT controller hits KS

SeedStudio’s hackable, $49 and up “ReSpeaker” speaker system runs OpenWrt on a Mediatek MT7688 and offers voice control over home appliances. The ReSpeaker went live on Kickstarter today and has already reached 95 percent of its $40,000 funding goal with 29 days remaining. The device is billed by SeedStudio as an “open source, modular voice interface that allows us to hack things around us, just using our voices.” While it can be used as an Internet media player or a voice-activated IoT hub — especially when integrated with Seeed’s Wio Link IoT board — it’s designed to be paired with individual devices. For example, the campaign’s video shows the ReSpeaker being tucked inside a teddy bear or toy robot, or attached to plant, enabling voice control and voice synthesis. Yes, the plant actually asks to be watered. Read more

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