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Hardware

Breaking the Nokia Booklet, Part 2: A win for Wubi.

Filed under
Hardware

Two things are clear from this experience: (1) Nokia made a very poor choice with the GMA 500, and (2) Wubi is a fantastic way to get Linux on your freedom-hating machine.

More here...

Disk-O-Tech: Linux Disk Management

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Linux
Hardware
HowTos

linux-mag.com: You might have worked with Linux for years and never added an additional disk to your system or perhaps you were too frustrated by Linux’s strange ways of dealing with disks to attempt it. In either case, here’s your opportunity to work through the steps required in adding a new disk to your system.

Open source champion Richard Stallman’s netbook

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Linux
Hardware

liliputing.com: Ever find yourself wondering what warrior for the open source movement Richard Stallman uses as his primary computer? It’s a Lemote Yeelong netbook.

Sony's First Linux Phone

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Hardware

katonda.com: Linux is gaining popularity in the mobile phone industry, thanks to Android. Sony Ericsson has also joined the Gnu-Linux club and announced the launch of their first Android-powered phone -- The Xperia X10.

Stuff That Works With Linux #4

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Hardware

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: Given that the majority of my digital files include nothing more than MP3s and family photographs, I'm fairly relaxed about how I secure the digital data I carry around with me. But if you're used to carrying sensitive material, whether personal or professional, then I have just the device for you - the iStorage DiskGenie.

ECS NVIDIA GeForce GT 240 512MB

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Hardware

phoronix.com: A month after NVIDIA launched the GeForce GT 220 graphics card they rolled out the GeForce GT 240, to further fill the performance void between the GT216-based GT 220 and the GeForce GTS 250 that had been around since March. We finally have our hands on a GeForce GT 240 graphics card from the folks over at ECS Elitegroup to see how this GT215 graphics card performs under Linux.

The Open-PC: one step closer to open-hardware

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Hardware

At the Gran Canaria Open Desktop Summit in July 2009, the Open-PC project was announced. The statement said the project aimed to “cooperatively design a Free Software based computer by and for the community”. Further this PC would use only hardware for which there are free software drivers available. This would be a PC with the minimal compromise required for running a free desktop. In January 2010 the project announced the launch of its first product.

Read the full article at Free Software Magazine.

For those about to Rock - Gentoo-based electronic guitar

Filed under
Linux
Gentoo
Hardware

geek.com: This crazy guitar is actually an open source MIDI system using a sexy touchscreen with multi-touch and reactive fretboard. The result? Called the Misa Digital he fretboard has 144 note buttons, runs Gentoo Linux and, friends, has an Ethernet port with SSH server. Now you can truly hack the Gibson.

Linux and USB 3.0

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Linux
Hardware

linuxplanet.com: The newest, fast interface, USB 3.0, is finally out, but only one operating system has native support for it: Linux.

Why aren’t Linux phones using SyncML?

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Hardware

There’s one thing about the Nokia N900’s Debian-based Maemo OS that I find bewildering and infuriating at the same time. It’s the lack of full support for SyncML — and in its place, Microsoft Exchange.

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Red Hat News

Linux and FOSS Events

  • Tracing Microconference Accepted into 2016 Linux Plumbers Conference
    After taking a break in 2015, Tracing is back at Plumbers this year! Tracing is heavily used throughout the Linux ecosystem, and provides an essential method for extracting information about the underlying code that is running on the system. Although tracing is simple in concept, effective usage and implementation can be quite involved.
  • Ubuntu Online Summit
    There's a fundamental difference between conferences for community-driven projects and closed-source commercial software. While Microsoft, Apple and other large companies hold regular meetings to keep developers updated, the information almost always flows in one direction. They (the software owners) tell us (the software users) what they are working on and what they are about to release. These releases almost always come out of the blue often leave the developer community scrabbling to catch up.
  • Libocon 2016: accommodation
    We’re progressing with the organization of LibreOffice Conference 2016 in Brno. Italo Vignoli of The Document Foundation visited Brno last month, we showed him the venue and also places where we could hold a party, have a hacknight etc.

How to campaign for the cause of software freedom

Free Software communities produce tons of great software. This software drives innovation and enables everybody to access and use computers, whether or not they can afford new hardware or commercial software. So that’s that, the benefit to society is obvious. Everybody should just get behind it and support it. Right? Well, it is not that easy. Especially when it comes to principles of individual freedom or trade-offs between self-determination and convenience, it is difficult to communicate the message in a way that it reaches and activates a wider audience. How can we explain the difference between Free Software and services available at no cost (except them spying at you) best? Campaigning for software freedom is not easy. However, it is part of the Free Software Foundation Europe’s mission. The FSFE teamed up with Peng! Collective to learn how to run influential campaigns to promote the cause of Free Software. The Peng Collective is a Berlin based group of activists who are known for their successful and quite subversive campaigns for political causes. And Endocode? Endocode is a sponsor of the Free Software Foundation Europe. We are a sponsor because free software is essential to us, both as a company and as members of society. And so here we are. Read more Also:

Samsung debuts an Artik IoT cloud platform and IDE

At the Samsung Developer Conference in San Francisco last week, Samsung was all about the Internet of Things, and its Artik IoT modules got lots of love. Surprisingly, much of Samsung’s focus at its developer conference did not revolve around Tizen or SmartThings. Instead, the main focus was on its newly shipping Artik embedded modules, which ship with Fedora. There was some Tizen related news, however, including a new ”Smart View” SDK for improving mobile connectivity with Tizen-based Smart TVs, as well as a promise to bring Knox security support to Tizen. There were also more details on the upcoming, 64-bit capable Tizen 3.0. Read more