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Hardware

Running Alpha Lucid on the Dell T7500

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

redmonk.com/sogrady: Dell shipped me a loaner top of the line workstation to test, the Dell Precision T7500. I’ll have more on what, specifically, the machine is for later. For now, a quick rundown on the specs, setup and software choices.

An adventure with an HP printer/scanner and Ubuntu

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

tenshu.net: For a while now I’ve been thinking about some ideas for a project that will require a scanner. No problem you think, scanners of various kinds have been supported in Linux for a long time.

Dedicated Vi device vies for buyers

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

theregister.co.uk: The NanoNote is a £90 portable computer, sporting open source hardware and software, but no wireless and little more than a Vi editor in the way of applications.

CrunchPad spin-off JooJoo spins up for launch

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

apcmag.com: Due to debut a week before the iPad, the Linux-powered tablet sports an Atom processor, Nvidia’s Ion graphics engine, 3G radio and a new UI.

Top 10 worst products ever

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Software

expertreviews.co.uk: Despite all the money companies spend on research and development, they still manage to trundle out some absolute junk. There are thousands of bad products out there, but here's the ten worst that we've encountered in all of our years of reviewing products.

Leading Edge? Bleeding Edge? Be careful!

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

community.zdnet.co.uk/blog: As those who are familiar with me know, I enjoy buying some of the latest gear available, and seeing how it is handled by a variety of Linux distributions. Sometimes, though, it is possible to get a bit too far ahead of the general development/release cycle.

HP Elite 7000 Microtower review

Filed under
Hardware
SUSE

linuxuser.co.uk: In an age when Linux has become a powerful platform for development work, graphics processing and video production, it’s a welcome relief to see a mid-range system built for people who may or may not have experience with Linux.

Nokia's N900 vs. Other QWERTY Keypads

Filed under
Hardware

Since Nokia's Maemo-powered smartphone is a mobile device (albeit a rather large one), I thought it might be interesting to see how it fares against other Nokia qwerty devices for character input.

In other words, it’s time for a smackdown!

System 76 Lemur Review

Filed under
Hardware

jonobacon.org: System76 are well known in the Open Source community for shipping Ubuntu on their machines, being active community members and for helping LoCo teams with machines too. I have never owned a System76 box so I thought this was a good opportunity to give it a ride and share some feedback.

Linux Nvidia drivers might also have the GPU fan speed issue

Filed under
Hardware
Software

linuxers.org: According to Nvidia, until the problem is resolved, Linux users should revert to 190.53 web release or the 195.30 public beta. They are going to remove the 195.36.08 and 195.36.03 drivers from NVIDIA's FTP site.

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