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Hardware

Cheap Linux wall warts small on size, big on possibilities

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

itwire.com: Every geek and technology lover will undoubtedly have stumbled across online adverts for tiny headless Linux-powered devices that are barely larger than the power point they plug into. What can you actually do with them? Plenty, it seems!

Reviewed: Pandora Console

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Hardware
Gaming

tuxradar.com: If you're familiar with the original GP2X and GP2X Wiz, the Linux-based handhelds produced by Korean techno-alchemists Game Park Holdings, you'll be acutely aware of just how close they came to greatness. Interestingly, some of the guys set about creating their own dream machine.

The $35 tablet isn't hogwash

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Hardware

techradar.com: Given India's chequered history of non-deliverable low-cost devices, it's easy to believe the sceptics of India's $35 tablet. But this device might just turn the tables.

Linux tablet runs Windows and Mac OS X, too

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OS
Hardware

linuxfordevices.com: Axon Logic announced a 10-inch tablet designed to run Linux, Windows, or -- the company coyly suggests -- Apple's OS X. The Axon Haptic has a 320GB hard drive for multiple operating system (OS) installation, a resistive touchscreen, optional Bluetooth and Verizon-compatible 3G, plus a 1.6GHz Atom N270 processor.

Nero brings blue ray disc support to Linux

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Hardware
Software

linusearch.com: Nero Linux 4 brings support for all optical disk including, Blue Ray disc support. The company that produces Nero Linux 4 claims that this is the only product to support blue data laser burning in Linux.

Dell Streak review

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Hardware

linuxuser.co.uk: The Dell Streak. Is it a tablet, or is a smartphone? Get your answers on a postcard, but not before checking out Linux User & Developer’s review…

AMD Radeon HD 4250 880G On Linux

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Hardware

phoronix.com: Today we have a few benchmarks of the Radeon HD 4250 (880G) under Linux for your viewing pleasure.

Build a Linux Media Center PC

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Software

extremetech.com: Media Center PCs have been around for almost a decade—even longer if you count earlier forays like Gateway's Destination PC lineup from the mid-1990s. It's not just about PCs, either.

Building a better netbook

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

computerworld.com: The NB30, built around the low-power 1.66GHz Intel Atom N450 system-on-a-chip (SoC) with integrated memory controller and graphics core with 1GB RAM, is pretty inexpensive at $379. But what did Samsung do? It decided the device should ship with Windows 7. So, what could improve on this situation?

where did all the Linux netbooks go?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

happyassassin.net: Mr. Telic holds out the netbook market as the counter to my theory that Linux is doing pretty crappily in the traditional operating system ‘market’. On the face of it, hey, that’s a pretty strong argument.

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