Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Hardware

FSF on ME

Filed under
GNU
Hardware
  • Intel & ME, and why we should get rid of ME

    If you did not know, built into all modern Intel-based platforms is a small, low-power computer subsystem called the Intel Management Engine (ME). It performs various tasks while the system is in sleep mode, during the boot process, and also when your system is running.

  • FSF Issues Statement Against Intel's Management Engine (ME)

    The Free Software Foundation is a bit late to the party, but have finally come out publicly against Intel's Management Engine (ME).

    For years already free hardware enthusiasts around the Coreboot/Libreboot scene have been upset over Intel's blobbed-up ME code. The FSF on Friday wrote a public statement over the matter.

  • Windows 10 Killing PCs, FSF Wants to Kill ME

    Today in Linux news PCLinuxOS is said to be moving to Plasma 5.6.4 and Linux 4.5.6. Katherine Noyes posted a slideshow of Mint 18 features and Dominique Leuenberger share the latest in Tumbleweed developments. Eric Hameleers is celebrating 10 years of SlackBuilds.org and The Inquirer reported today that PC sales are falling fast - and it's all Windows 10's fault. Swapnil Bhartiya interviewed Jonathan Riddell and the Free Software Foundation posted that "we should get rid of ME."

Development Boards

Filed under
Development
Hardware

FOSS in 3D Printing

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Open source wifi enabled 3D printer controller Franklin speeds up with new release

    3D printing hit the mainstream a few years ago thanks in part to the open-source 3D printer market. The origins of this transition had to do with expiring patents held by the traditionally held commercial 3D printing companies. Since then, several small businesses have sprung up around the emerging low-cost 3D printer market. Some of these companies embraced the open-source mentality, while others are seeking shelter with patents.

  • Hackaday Prize Entry: Open-Source Myoelectric Hand Prosthesis

    Hands can grab things, build things, communicate, and we control them intuitively with nothing more than a thought. To those who miss a hand, a prosthesis can be a life-changing tool for carrying out daily tasks. We are delighted to see that [Alvaro Villoslada] joined the Hackaday Prize with his contribution to advanced prosthesis technology: Dextra, the open-source myoelectric hand prosthesis.

  • BCN3D Technologies releases open source files for BCN3D Sigma 3D printer

    As our readers will know, an important part of the 3D printing community is the idea of accessibility. Of course, it is more than just an idea, as everyday makers around the world share their 3D designs and models for free, and even 3D printing companies exercise an open-source philosophy with DIY 3D printers and accessible models. Recently, Barcelona based 3D printer developer BCN3D Technologies decided to further embrace the additive manufacturing open-source philosophy with their latest initiative, Open Source 360º. As part of the initiative, the company has announced that it will share all of its engineering, design, and fabrication information used in the manufacturing of their flagship product, the BCN3D Sigma 3D printer.

  • Shellmo: Aquatic 3D printed robot for fun and education

    Recently I came across a very interesting open hardware project called Shellmo. What caught my eye was that it's a 3D printed crustacean that seems to have no apparent real world use, though with a little creativity I can see educational implications.

    Shellmo is a unique, almost cartoon-like creatures that could captivate the imagination of children while at the same time affording them an opportunity to 3D print their own robot. With the current emphasis on STEM in education, Shellmo appears to be the kind of project that would stimulate student interest.

Hardware/Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

$1 Open Source Hacking Board Is Here For Programming And Electronics

Filed under
Development
Hardware

To make the process of learning programming and DIYing easier and cheaper, One Dollar Board’s crowdfunding campaign has arrived on Indiegogo. The team behind the project aims to make the board available at a price of $1 + shipping all across the world, with a focus on developing countries.

Read more

FCC vs. FOSS

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

Hardware/Linux

Filed under
Android
Linux
Hardware

Hardware Modding/Hacking/Security

Filed under
Hardware
Security
  • Libreboot on my X60s
  • Nexenta to Showcase Market Leading Open Source-Driven Software-Defined Storage Solutions at Cloud Expo Europe, London
  • Cybersecurity education isn't good, nobody is shocked

    There was a news story published last week about the almost total lack of cybersecurity attention in undergraduate education. Most people in the security industry won't be surprised by this. In the majority of cases when the security folks have to talk to developers, there is a clear lack of understanding about security.

  • Making it easier to deploy TPMTOTP on non-EFI systems

    On EFI systems you can handle this by sticking the secret in an EFI variable (there's some special-casing in the code to deal with the additional metadata on the front of things you read out of efivarfs). But that's not terribly useful if you're not on an EFI system. Thankfully, there's a way around this. TPMs have a small quantity of nvram built into them, so we can stick the secret there. If you pass the -n argument to sealdata, that'll happen. The unseal apps will attempt to pull the secret out of nvram before falling back to looking for a file, so things should just magically work.

  • 6 steps to calculate ROI for an open hardware project

    Free and open source software advocates have courageously blazed a trail that is now being followed by those interested in open source for physical objects. It's called free and open source hardware (FOSH), and we're seeing an exponential rise in the number of free designs for hardware released under opensource licenses, Creative Commons licenses,or placed in the public domain.

An open source microprocessor for wearables

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

Open Hardware

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • First Open Source GPU Could Change Future of Computing

    Nyami is significant in the research, computing and open source communities because it marks the first time open source has been used to design a GPU, as well as the first time a research team was able to test how different hardware and software configurations affect GPU performance. The results of the experiments the researchers performed are now part of the open source community, and that work will help others follow in the original research team’s footsteps. According to Timothy Miller, a computer science assistant professor at Binghamton, as others create their own GPUs using open source, it will push computing power to the next level.

  • We are happy to share our FREE and OPEN-SOURCE microprocessor system PULPino!

    Not a toy design: PULPino is a mature design: it has been taped-out as an ASIC in UMC 65nm in January 2016. The PULPino platform is available for RTL simulation as well for FPGA mapping. It has full debug support on all targets. In addition we support extended profiling with source code annotated execution times through KCacheGrind in RTL simulations.

    And it is free, no registration, no strings attached, you can use it, change it, adapt it, add to your own chip, use it for classes, research, projects, products… We just ask you to acknowledge the source, and if possible, let us know what you like and what you like and don’t like.

  • Wiring was Arduino before Arduino

    Hernando Barragán is the grandfather of Arduino of whom you’ve never heard. And after years now of being basically silent on the issue of attribution, he’s decided to get some of his grudges off his chest and clear the air around Wiring and Arduino. It’s a long read, and at times a little bitter, but if you’ve been following the development of the Arduino vs Arduino debacle, it’s an important piece in the puzzle.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Android, Chromebook Make a Sweet Couple

Running Android apps on a Chromebook gives the Chrome OS added functionality. It has the potential to morph the Chromebook into a portable computing device that offers the best of two Linux worlds. Still, Google engineers have some tinkering to do before Android apps and the Chrome OS are fully implemented and functional. This transition will not be complete until the Google Play Store works out of the box on new Chromebooks without users having to "upgrade" through Developer's Mode. Read more

A Grand Experiment

The latest debacle over the "forced" upgrade to Windows 10 and Apple's increasingly locked-in ecosystem has got me thinking. Do I really need to use a proprietary operating system to get work done? And while I'm at it, do I need to use commercial cloud services to store my data? I've always used Linux since the first time I tried installing Slackware in the mid-90s. In 1998 we were the first national TV show to install Linux live (Red Hat). And I've often advocated Ubuntu to people with older computers. I usually have at least one computer running Linux around, in the past couple of years Dell XPS laptops have been great choices. And a couple of months ago I bought a 17" Oryx laptop from System76, an Ubuntu system integrator, for use in studio. But as time went by, even Ubuntu began to seem too commercial to me, and I've migrated to community supported Debian testing and the Arch-based Antergos distros for everything. (i use Antergos on my Oryx on the shows.) Read more Also: Microsoft lays off remaining handful of Microsoft Press staff

Karbonn confirms Android One smartphone(s) launching in Q1 next year

In an interview with TOI Tech, Karbonn Mobiles has confirmed it will be introducing new Android One-based smartphone(s) early next year. Karbonn's Managing Director Pradeep Jain said the company is in talks with Google for Android One, and we might see some Android One smartphone launch(es) in Q1 of next year. Read more