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Hardware

Linux Devices: ARM and La Frite

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Linux
Hardware
  • Arm brings Intel, Arduino, myDevices into the Pelion IoT platform ecosystem

    Arm on Monday is announcing a series of new partnerships that will enhance Pelion, its Internet of Things platform, making it easier for customers to deploy and manage a wider range of IoT devices on the platform.

    First, the Peltion Platform can now be used to manage Intel Architecture (x86) platforms, in addition to Arm-based IoT devices and gateways. Next, Arm is partnering with myDevices to make it easier to quickly onboard a wider array of devices. Additionally, Arduino is partnering with Pelion Connectivity Management to enable developers to quickly create and scale cellular IoT designs.

  • ARM expands Pelion IoT platform to Intel, Linux ecosystems

    In addition, the company announced Mbed Linux OS, which builds on its Mbed OS for IoT devices based on Cortex-A. Mbed Linux OS is integrated with the Pelion IoT Platform and is designed to open up new classes of IoT devices with complex applications, such as those processing video or edge gateways. Developers can sign-up now for early access to the new software.

  • Raspberry Pi A+-sized $10 La Frite Linux board has better specs at half the price

    The La Frite board is a follow up to Libre Computing's $25 Le Potato board and is "loosely based" on the design of the Raspberry Pi A+ -- a smaller and cheaper Pi than the $35 Raspberry Pi B+ -- due to the 40-pin GPIO header setup.

    It's currently available to backers on the device's Kickstarter page and will be generally available in November.

Linux in La Frite and Airtame

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Linux
Hardware
  • La Frite mini PC by Libre Computer Project from $10

    La Frite is a new open source development board created by the Libre Computer Project which has this week launched via Kickstarter and offers a miniaturised version of the popular Le Potato SBC supported by mainline Linux and Android 8 operating system.

    La Frite is a modern low power mini PC with four 64-bit cores, and can be equipped with up to a gigabyte of DDR4 RAM, supported by ARM Mali GPU powering high definition HDMI. It is loosely based on the Raspberry Pi Model A+ and maintains similar GPIO header arrangement. Connections on the mini PC include 2 x USB ports and Ethernet.

  • Libre Computer’s La Frite is a $20 single board computer ($5 and up during crowdfunding)

    Libre Computer’s latest Linux-friendly single-board computer features a 1.2 GHz ARM Cortex-A53 quad-core processor, ARM Mali-450 graphics, and a target price of $20 when the Le Frite goes on sale at Amazon later this year.

    But folks who pre-order one through the company’s Kickstarter campaign might be able to score one for as little as $5.

  • Libre sets La Frite mini computer board free

    China's Libre Computer has hit Kickstarter for an alternative to the Raspberry Pi Zero called La Frite. Essentially a smaller version of the company's Le Potato computer board, which also launched on Kickstarter last year, the 2.5 x 2.2 inch (6.4 x 5.5 cm) development board is aimed squarely at makers on a tight budget.

  • A $10 Raspberry Pi alternative? La Frite packs Pi-like specs into low-cost Linux board

    The $10 La Frite comes close to matching some key specs of the $35 Pi 3 B+, using the same underlying Arm-based CPU and even offering faster DDR4 memory.

    On paper, the La Frite also promises comparable video playback performance to the Pi 3 B+, can output to 1080p displays via HDMI 1.4, and offers two USB 2.0 ports.

    As you'd expect for the price there are various cutbacks. The board is missing the Pi 3 B+'s Wi-Fi support, and offers a slightly slower wired Ethernet connection than the Pi 3 B+. While the underlying CPU is the same, a quad-core Arm Cortex A53-based processor, the La Frite's CPU runs slightly slower than the Pi's, 1.2GHz compared to 1.4GHz.

  • Airtame raises $1.26 million in crowdfunding for its wireless HDMI dongle. What is it, and what’s next?

    Danish startup Airtame couldn’t have had a better beginning of the year.

    A relatively obscure company that was started in Copenhagen a mere seven months ago, Airtame kicked off a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo at the end of last year to raise a modest $160,000 to help turn its wireless HDMI dongle into a real product.

    What they got is a lot of attention from media and potential customers, the coveted ‘Best Startup of CES 2014’ award from Engadget, and a lot more capital to work with than they had initially anticipated.

New Wine With Graphics Work/Latest Changes, NVIDIA's GPU Work, and Intel's Work on Mesa

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware
  • Wine Announcement
  • Wine 3.18 Brings FreeType Subpixel Font Rendering, Wine Console DPI Scaling

    A new bi-weekly Wine development release is out for those wanting to try the latest Windows gaming on Linux experience (outside of Steam Play / Proton) or running other Windows applications on Linux and other operating systems.

    The key features of Wine 3.18 include sub-pixel font rendering in conjunction with FreeType 2.8.1+, support for the OAEP algorithm within the RSA encryption code, array marshalling fixes in DCOM, improved DPI scaling for the Wine console, and various bug fixes.

  • NVIDIA Accelerates Server Workloads with RAPIDS GPU Software

    GPUs, or Graphics Process Units, are somewhat of a misnomer in the modern age for many of the applications where there are deployed. While GPUs are an important component for graphics, high-end gaming and design, they are also being widely used to accelerate High Performance Computing (HPC) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) workloads.

    This week, NVIDIA announced its RAPIDS open source software for GPUs, alongside multiple partners, including Oracle, HPE and IBM.

  • Intel Whiskey Lake Support Formally Added To Mesa 18.3

    The recently posted patch for Intel Whiskey Lake support in Mesa has now been merged for Mesa 18.3.

    Intel announced Whiskey Lake and Amber Lake in late August. While Intel is usually many months or even years ahead of schedule with their open-source driver enablement for new graphics generations, Whiskey Lake basically comes down to re-branded Coffeelake UHD Graphics... Some of the PCI IDs in fact have already been present in the Intel Linux driver as reserved Coffeelake PCI IDs.

Community backed Kaby Lake SBC ships with downloadable Ubuntu image

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Hardware
Ubuntu

DFRobot has fulfilled KS orders for its Kaby Lake based LattePanda Alpha SBC, and is shipping a model with 8GB RAM and 64GB eMMC without OS that supports Windows 10 or Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

DFRobot’s LattePanda project has fulfilled its Kickstarter orders for its community-backed, Intel 7th Gen Core based LattePanda Alpha after several months of delays, and public sales have switched from pre-order to in-stock fulfillment for at least one model. Like the earlier, Intel Cherry Trail based LattePanda, the LattePanda Alpha is notable for being a community backed (but not fully open source) hacker board loaded with Windows 10. Yet with the LattePanda Alpha, you can also choose a more affordable barebones version without a Windows 10 key that supports an optimized, downloadable Ubuntu 16.04 LTS image.

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La Frite: A Libre ARM SBC For $5, 10x Faster Than The Raspberry Pi Zero

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Linux
Hardware

The folks at the Libre Computer Project who have successfully released the Tritium, Le Potato, and other ARM SBCs while being as open-source friendly as possible have now announced La Frite.

La Frite is a low-end offering with their 512MB model shipping for just $5 USD or the 1GB version for $10... In other words, aimed squarely at the Raspberry Pi Zero and intended for IoT use-cases and other purposes.

The $5 ARM SBC is said to be 10x faster than the Raspberry Pi Zero plus having real HDMI, Ethernet, and USB ports.

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GPUs and Graphics: Nvidia, X.Org Developers' Conference, vRt and ROCm

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware

Network appliance and ATX board debut AMD’s Epyc Embedded 3000

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Linux
Hardware

Ibase has launched the first network appliance based on AMD’s Epyc Embedded 3000 SoC. The 1U rackmount “FWA8800” appliance features 16 or 32 GbE ports and is built on a new “MBN806” ATX board.

We don’t regularly cover high-end, rackmount network appliances, but we thought this one might be of interest: As promised in February when AMD announced the Xeon-like Epyc Embedded 3000 SoC along with its Ryzen Embedded V1000, Ibase has released the first network appliance based on the Epyc chip. The 1U rackmount FWA8800 network appliance features 2x or 4x NIC slots for up to 16x or 32 GbE ports.

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Google+ and Hyper-Threading (Intel) Compromised

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Google
Hardware
Security
  • Project Strobe: Protecting your data, improving our third-party APIs, and sunsetting consumer Google+

    Many third-party apps, services and websites build on top of our various services to improve everyone’s phones, working life, and online experience. We strongly support this active ecosystem. But increasingly, its success depends on users knowing that their data is secure, and on developers having clear rules of the road.

  • Google+ Is Shutting Down After Data Breach

    Google has decided to shut down the consumer version of its failed social network Google+. This news comes in the wake of a previously undisclosed security flaw that exposed the data of the profile of users.

    The bug in question remained active between 2015 and 2018, and Google discovered it in March; during this period, the flaw affected more than 500,000 users. However, Google claims to have no evidence that suggests that any external developer or app had access to the data.

  • Google Concealed Data Breach Over Fear Of Repercussions; Shuts Down Google+ Service

    Google opted in the Spring not to disclose that the data of hundreds of thousands of Google+ users had been exposed because the company says they found no evidence of misuse, reports the Wall Street Journal. The Silicon Valley giant feared both regulatory scrutiny and regulatory damage, according to documents reviewed by the Journal and people briefed on the incident.

    In response to being busted, Google parent Alphabet is set to announce broad privacy measures which include permanently shutting down all consumer functionality of Google+, a move which "effectively puts the final nail in the coffin of a product that was launched in 2011 to challenge Facebook, and is widely seen as one of Google's biggest failures."

  • Google+ is Dead, Survived By Better Privacy Controls

    Earlier this year, Google started a project to review third-party developer access to Google accounts through the use of APIs. It found a security breach surrounding Google+, and is now shutting the service down, at least for consumers.

    The long and short of the issue is that there was a security hole that allowed third-party developers to access Google+ users’ account data, including name, email address, occupation, gender, and age—even if the account was set as private.. This isn’t particularly sensitive data, but regardless, a breach is a breach.

    The bug was discovered in March of 2018, but was presumed to have been open since sometime in 2015. To make matters slightly more troubling, Google only keeps this particular API’s data log for two weeks…so the company has no way of knowing which users were affected. Presumably, however, some 500,000 users were on the list.

  • How does TLBleed abuse the Hyper-Threading feature in Intel chips?

    A new side-channel attack called TLBleed abuses the Hyper-Threading feature of Intel chips. Researchers say there is a high success rate of TLBleed exploits, but Intel currently has no plans to patch it. How does TLBleed work, and what are the risks of not patching it?

LoRa gateway and node boards run on Raspberry Pi power

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Linux
Hardware

Pi Supply is Kickstartering Iot LoRa Gateway and IoT LoRa Node pHAT add-ons for the Raspberry Pi, as well as a LoRa Node that works with the Micro:bit. An Arduino node is also in the works.

Pi Supply, which has produced a variety of Raspberry Pi add-on boards including the Papirus E-Paper display and Flick HAT gesture detector, has now returned to Kickstarter to launch a series of IoT LoRa Boards that work with the Pi. The offerings include an IoT LoRa Gateway HAT board starting at an early bird price of 120 UK Pounds ($157) and a LoRa Node pHAT node board with a 25 Pound ($33) early bird price.

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'Open' Hardware: LinuxBoot and OpenPOWER

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Hardware
OSS
  • LinuxBoot for Servers: Enter Open Source, Goodbye Proprietary UEFI

    LinuxBoot is an Open Source alternative to Proprietary UEFI firmware. It was released last year and is now being increasingly preferred by leading hardware manufacturers as default firmware. Last year, LinuxBoot was warmly welcomed into the Open Source family by The Linux Foundation.

    This project was an initiative by Ron Minnich, author of LinuxBIOS and lead of coreboot at Google, in January 2017.

    Google, Facebook, Horizon Computing Solutions, and Two Sigma collaborated together to develop the LinuxBoot project (formerly called NERF) for server machines based on Linux.

  • Raptor Computing Reveals More Details About Their Blackbird Low-Cost POWER9 Board

    This week at the OpenPOWER Summit Amsterdam, Texas-based libre computer vendor Raptor Computing Systems announced Blackbird as a low-cost, micro-ATX POWER9 motherboard to be available in the coming months. The company has now revealed some additional details.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • cairo release 1.16.0 now available
    After four years of development since 1.14.0, version 1.16.0 of the cairo 2D graphics library has been released.
  • Cairo 1.16 Released With OpenGL ES 3.0 Support, Colored Emojis
    It's been four years since the debut of the Cairo 1.14 stable series and today that has been succeeded by Cairo 1.16. Cairo, as a reminder, is the vector graphics library for 2D drawing and supports back-ends ranging from OpenGL to PDF, PostScript, DirectFB, and SVG outputs. Cairo is used by the likes of the GTK+ tool-kit, Mozilla's Gecko engine, Gnuplot, Poppler, and many other open-source projects.
  • Open source MDM offers flexibility, with challenges
    Open source platforms may require more effort from IT than commercial products do, but they can also address an organization's specific requirements -- if the company is willing to invest in the necessary resources. The open source mobile device management (MDM) market is very limited, but there are a few options. If organizations determine that an open source platform is worth the effort, then they can weigh a few different options for open source MDM tools.
  • Three-Year Moziversary
    Another year at Mozilla. They certainly don’t slow down the more you have of them. For once a year of stability, organization-wise. The two biggest team changes were the addition of Jan-Erik back on March 1, and the loss of our traditional team name “Browser Measurement II” for a more punchy and descriptive “Firefox Telemetry Team.”
  • Citus Data donates 1% equity to non-profit PostgreSQL orgs
    There’s open source and there’s open source. There’s genuine free and open source software (FOSS) and then there’s largely locked down proprietary non-dynamic library open source that is generally supplied as a commercially supported version of an open source kernel base that doesn’t see whole lot of real world code commits — and, no, there’s no acronym for that. Then, there’s other ways of evidencing real open openness such as non-technical contributions (could be language translation/localisation etc.) and then there’s plain old contributions. Scale-out Postgres database technologies ​​​​Citus Data is donating 1 percent of its equity to non-profit PostgreSQL organisations in the US and Europe.
  • Pagely NorthStack Makes WordPress Serverless
    WordPress is getting the serverless treatment, thanks to a new effort from managed WordPress hosting provider Pagely. The new NorthStack platform disaggregates the usual stack that WordPress requires into a series of services that largely run on serverless infrastructure at Amazon Web Services (AWS). The NorthStack effort is an attempt to lower the fixed costs and infrastructure needed to deploy and run WordPress. "WordPress itself is based on 12-year-old code. It does not want to be in a serverless environment," Joshua Strebel, CEO of Pagely, told eWEEK. "WordPress wants to live on one AWS EC2 node up next to its database with everything all contained in it."
  • Why Open Source Healthcare is Vital for Innovation
    Dana Lewis’ story is far from being a rarity. The diabetes industry is one of the worst offenders for overcharging or price gouging medication and equipment for patients. This is leading many individuals to take the same path as Dana Lewis. Open source platforms like OpenAPS, GitHub pages, and social media offer DIYers step-by-step instructions on how to build their own artificial pancreas tools. Kate Farnsworth built a DIY monitor device that keeps blood sugar levels of her diabetic daughter in constant check This tool, that has dramatically improved the life of a 15-year-old Sydney, cost her mom just $250.
  • The EU has approved Microsoft’s $7.5 billion GitHub acquisition
     

    Microsoft’s upcoming $7.5 billion acquisition of GitHub has cleared another major hurdle: the EU has approved the deal after determining that there are no antitrust concerns in Microsoft buying the popular open-source software repository, via the Financial Times.  

  • EU watchdog waves through Microsoft's GitHub takeover
     

    The EC noted that, in making its decision, it probed whether Microsoft would leverage the popularity of GitHut to boost sales of its own DevOps tools and cloud services, and looked into whether Microsoft would have the ability and incentive to further integrate its own DevOps tools and cloud services with GitHub while limiting integration with third parties' DevOps tools and cloud services.

  • Microsoft’s $7.5BN GitHub buy gets green-lit by EU regulators
     

    The Commission decided Microsoft would have no incentive to undermine the GitHub’s openness — saying any attempt to do so would reduce its value for developers, who the Commission judged as willing and able to switch to other platforms.

  • EU clears Microsoft acquisition of GitHub
  • Doing your civic duty one line of code at a time
    When it comes to doing our civic duty in today's technologically driven world, there is a perception that we don't care like older generations did. History teaches us that in the early 20th century's New Deal, Americans stepped up to the nation's challenges on a wide range of government-financed public works projects. Airport construction. Infrastructure improvements. Building dams, bridges, hospitals. This was more than just individuals "pulling themselves up by their bootstraps" but, by design, performing incredible civic duties. Quite an amazing feat when you think about it.

Security: U.S. CMS Breach and New Security Woes for Popular 'IoT' Protocols

  • U.S. CMS says 75,000 individuals' files accessed in data breach
  • CMS Responding to Suspicious Activity in Agent and Broker Exchanges Portal

    At this time, we believe that approximately 75,000 individuals’ files were accessed. While this is a small fraction of consumer records present on the FFE, any breach of our system is unacceptable.

  • New Security Woes for Popular IoT Protocols
    Researchers at Black Hat Europe will detail denial-of-service and other flaws in MQTT, CoAP machine-to-machine communications protocols that imperil industrial and other IoT networks online. Security researcher Federico Maggi had been collecting data – some of it sensitive in nature – from hundreds of thousands of Message Queuing Telemetry Transport (MQTT) servers he found sitting wide open on the public Internet via Shodan. "I would probe them and listen for 10 seconds or so, and just collect data from them," he says. He found data on sensors and other devices sitting in manufacturing and automotive networks, for instance, as well as typical consumer Internet of Things (IoT) gadgets. The majority of data, Maggi says, came from consumer devices and sensors or was data he couldn’t identify. "There was a good amount of data from factories, and I was able to find data coming from pretty expensive industrial machines, including a robot," he says.

BSD: FreeBSD 12.0 Beta and Upgrading OpenBSD with Ansible

Graphics: XRGEARS and Arcan's Latest

  • XRGEARS: Infamous "Gears" Now On VR Headsets With OpenHMD, Vulkan
    Well, the virtual reality (VR) demo scene is now complete with having glxgears-inspired gears and Utah teapot rendering on VR head mounted displays with the new XRGEARS. Kidding aside about the gears and teapot, XRGEARS is a nifty new open-source project with real value by Collabora developer Lubosz Sarnecki. XRGEARS is a standalone VR demo application built using the OpenHMD initiative for tracking and Vulkan for rendering. XRGEARS supports both Wayland and X11 environments or even running off KMS itself. This code also makes use of VK_EXT_direct_mode_display with DRM leasing.
  • Arcan versus Xorg – Approaching Feature Parity
    This is the first article out of three in a series where I will go through what I consider to be the relevant Xorg feature set, and compare it, point by point, to how the corresponding solution or category works in Arcan. This article will solely focus on the Display Server set of features and how they relate to Xorg features, The second article will cover the features that are currently missing (e.g. network transparency) when they have been accounted for. The third article will cover the features that are already present in Arcan (and there are quite a few of those) but does not exist in Xorg.
  • Arcan Display Server Is Nearing Feature Parity With The X.Org Server
    The Arcan display server, which started off years ago sounding like a novelty with being a display server built off a game engine in part and other interesting features, is nearing feature parity with the X.Org Server. While most hobbyist display server projects have failed, Arcan has continued advancing and with an interesting feature set. Recently they have even been working on a virtual reality desktop and an interesting desktop in general. Arcan is getting close to being able to offering the same functionality as a traditional X.Org Server. If you are interested in a lengthy technical read about the differences between Arcan and X.Org, the Arcan developers themselves did some comparing and contrasting when it comes to the display support, windowing, input, font management, synchronization, and other areas.