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Hardware

Raspberry Pi and Banana Pi

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Linux
Hardware
  • Particle Cloud IoT platform adds Raspberry Pi support

    Particle announced Raspberry Pi support for its “Particle Cloud” IoT development platform, and has launched a $100 starter kit based on the Raspberry Pi 3.

    Particle is opening its Particle Cloud IoT development platform to integrate Raspberry Pi-based endpoints, expanding its lineup of prototyping hardware from MCU-based devices like the Internet Button to more advanced Linux-driven devices. The first 1,000 developers to sign up for the Raspberry Pi beta will be offered a first wave of access on Nov. 22.

  • Latest Banana Pi offers SATA and 2GB RAM

    Sinovoip’s $48, open-spec “Banana Pi M2 Ultra” SBC updates the M2 with native SATA support and 2GB RAM, plus a new quad core Cortex-A7 Allwinner R40 SoC.

Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware

AMD Open Compute

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Hardware

96Boards-like SBC offers wireless and Ethernet

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Linux
Hardware

Geniatech’s “Development Board IV” is a 96Boards-like SBC that runs Android or Debian on a Snapdragon 410, and features 40- and 60-pin expansion connectors.

Linaro’s 96Boards spec has taken off to the point that we’re beginning to see clones and near-clones that are not yet sanctioned by 96Boards.org with an official mark of compliance, as in the case of Fujitsu’s 96Boards CE compatible F-Cue SBC. In the case Geniatech’s Development Board IV, there is not even a mention of 96Boards. The SBC, which is also referred to as Developer Board 4 and DB4, has 96Boards-like 40- and 60-pin connectors, and a feature set that is very similar to that of Qualcomm/Arrow’s DragonBoard 410c.

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Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware
  • Raspberry Pi VC4 Works On ETC1 Support, Power Management Tweaks

    Eric Anholt at Broadcom continues to be busy hacking on the open-source VC4 DRM+Gallium3D stack for providing fully open-source Raspberry Pi graphics stack support.

  • Nintendo makes its NES emulator the same way everyone else does

    Nintendo’s NES Classic is, at its core essence, a Nintendo-approved NES emulator that comes with 30 ROMs. It feels very similar to the sort of thing people have been building for ages by running Linux on a Raspberry Pi — with the main difference from a conceptual standpoint being that the NES Classic is considerably less legally questionable.

  • The NES Classic Mini Is Actually a Tiny Linux PC

    There’s a very good chance that if you’re reading Geek.com you were already excited about the launch of the NES Classic Mini. Here’s some more exciting news: it’s actually a Linux PC, and it may also be hackable.

    Gamespot’s Peter Brown took apart the Classic Mini to see what made it tick. He was a more than a little disappointed by what he found — that the Mini’s flash memory was soldered directly to the mainboard. That seemed like bad news since it meant that unless you had a fairly light touch with a soldering iron that you wouldn’t be augmenting the Mini’s default stash of 30 games.

  • Man transforms rare talking fish into Amazon Echo rival to see if it's wet

    He was a late nineties phenomenon, a mounted animatronic latex fish that sang songs while jiggling itself about and turning to face you. The early ones were motion activated, so when you walked past you’d be frightened so much you’d need a heart sturgeon. It was only later that you could trigger Bobby McFerrin and Al Green covers by pressing a button.

    [...]

    We already knew that Amazon’s AI assistant was open source, and was available as a Raspberry Pi project long before Echo reached this country. So what’s the next logical step? Apparently this.

  • Orange Pi PC2 Is a $20 Quad-Core Computer for Android, Linux

    Orange Pi might not be a big name in the computer industry but the company seems to be doing all things right to get noticed. The computer manufacturer has come up with a 64-bit quad-core computer that can easily find its utility in several projects. However, the most lucrative aspect about this compact-sized computer is its price, as it costs just $20 (roughly Rs. 1,300).

  • Samsung Pay is Samsung’s vision of money for millennials – and it’s gaining traction

    One year, three months and 100 million transactions later the service is about to make a quantum leap in user experience as it’s becoming available in three new countries at once and is about to start supporting online and in-app purchase as well as location-based deals and stuff. You wouldn’t expect this from a company who’s coming off such “burning” issues, yet we are.

  • Android 7.0 CDD says Google may soon require OEMs to stop screwing with USB-C charging standards
  • Google Releases Android’s Distribution Numbers for November

    Google just released the November security update and around that time we also see the platform’s official distribution numbers as well. This data was recorded during the 7-day period between November 1st and November 7th, and Google reminds us that any version of Android that doesn’t make up at least 0.1% of the platform is not represented here in this graph. Yet, we’re still seeing Android 2.2 Froyo being used by 0.1% of the people who are accessing the Play Store.

Open Source for Hardware (and Open Source CNC Machine)

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Hardware
OSS
  • An Open Source 96 MSPS Logic Analyzer For $22

    If you are in the market for an inexpensive USB logic analyser you have a several choices, but few of them deliver much in the way of performance. There are kits from China for a few dollars using microcontrollers at their heart, but they fail to deliver significant sample rates. If you require more, you will have to pay for it.

    [...]

    This project has the promise to add a very useful piece of test equipment to the armoury of the engineer on a budget, and to aid the cost-conscious reader he’s provided extensive documentation and installation instructions, as well as the code for the FPGA. Thanks to one of the more awesome hacks of 2015, there is an entirely open toolchain for this Lattice part, and our own [Al Williams] has written up a multi-part getting-started guide if you want to get your feet wet. You probably want one of these anyway, and now it’s a logic analyzer to boot.

  • Global CNC Metal Cutting Machine Tools Market Growth Value, Demand and Analysis 2016
  • Massive Open Source CNC Machine Created Offering 8 x 4ft Cutting Area (video)

    If you are looking for a large format CNC machine you might be interested in a new open source system which has been created by Bar Smith in the form of the Maslow CNC which provides a cutting surface 8 x 4ft in size.

Lenovo Issues Yoga Laptop BIOS Update To Fix Linux Woes

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

Last month was the controversy over some Lenovo Yoga laptops not working with Linux that was first alleged to be due to a Microsoft "Signature PC" requirement that later turned out to be incorrect. Well, the good news now is that Lenovo has issued a BIOS update and should allow for better Linux compatibility.

The new BIOS release that's specifically targeting Linux users now creates an AHCI SATA Controller Mode option from the BIOS and once that's enabled, you should have no problems installing Linux on the Yoga Y900. This BIOS update isn't intended for WIndows users.

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Linux Devices

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Linux
Hardware

Printing (3-D and 2-D)

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Hardware
OSS
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More in Tux Machines

Getting started with Raspberry Pi

So you have a Raspberry Pi, or you’re thinking of getting one, and you want to know how to get started and how to become a master user of one. The Raspberry Pi is a single board computer, meaning that in many ways it's a regular PC, except that everything that makes up the computer is on a single board rather than a traditional PC, which has a motherboard and requires a number of additional daughterboards to make a whole unit. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Shadow Tactics: Blades of the Shogun Hardcore Tactical Stealth Game Out on Linux
    More and more AAA games are coming to our beloved Linux platform, and nothing makes us happier than to see Daedalic Entertainment's Shadow Tactics: Blades of the Shogun title launching today on Steam for Linux, Mac, and Windows. If you're not familiar with Daedalic Entertainment's work, they are the creators of the superb and fun Deponia series, but Shadow Tactics: Blades of the Shogun is something different, a tactical stealth-strategy game in the style of the Commandos stealth-oriented real-time tactics video game series.
  • Shadow Tactics: Blades of the Shogun, the top-down stealth game is now out
    Shadow Tactics: Blades of the Shogun [GOG, Steam, Official Site] is the rather good top-down stealth game from Mimimi Productions. It's now out way a day-1 Linux release and it has a demo. I played the demo and I was massively impressed, so impressed that I would very much like to cover the game properly. So I will be reaching out to the developer for a key.
  • The Keeper, a promising looking side-scrolling survival action game with plenty of action is coming to Linux
    The Keeper side-scrolling survival action game full of boss battles, a combo system for combat and a day and night cycle will come to Linux.
  • Editorial: A chat about asking developers for a Linux port
    It has come to my attention recently that some people have been taking a really hard stance against developers who want to gauge interest for a Linux port. I want to talk about it for a bit. [...] Be the Linux community I know and love, be helpful to developers, get in on beta testing when you can (I’ve seen plenty of developers give out free keys for this too!) and appreciate the good games we get. We are a smaller market in most people’s eyes, so let’s not turn away anything that could help us grow even a little. The fact is, I’ve seen multiple games only come to Linux because Linux fans showed actual interest in it. One such example is Nightside, which I discovered on Steam. After a quick chat with the developer, I was able to convince them to do a Linux build and after a short test they then decided to do support a Linux build. There’s many such examples like this, but due to the amount of games I cover that’s one I could quickly pull up (without having to sift through hundreds of articles).
  • Dawn of War II has a minor patch to fix a few issues
  • Khronos are working on an open standard for VR, Valve will use it
  • BOOR, a new puzzle platformer will arrive with Linux support next year
    BOOR [Official Site] is a new puzzle platformer from developer Dazlog Studio and publisher BadLand Games that will have Linux support. We have many puzzle platformers now, so I do hope BOOR has something to set itself apart from the rest of them. I haven't seen anything in the trailer or the feature list that really jumps out at me. I am hoping when they reveal more gameplay it will look more enticing.
  • The developers of 'EVERSPACE' are still working on the Linux version, seeking help from Epic Games
    EVERSPACE [Steam, Official Site] is the fantastic looking UE4 space shooter that's being ported to Linux, but the developers have encountered a problem with lighting bugs. I follow the topic on Steam, but a user also emailed this in to ask me to highlight it. I would have anyway since I'm interested in it.
  • Total War: WARHAMMER - Realm of The Wood Elves DLC will come to Linux soon
    Total War: WARHAMMER - Realm of The Wood Elves [Steam] is the next DLC that introduces an exciting race into this strategy game. Feral have confirmed it will be on Linux soon with the quick tweet they sent out.
  • DoomRL or 'DRL' as it's now called has gone open source
    After ZeniMax sent the lawyers knocking, the developer of what was called DoomRL (Doom Roguelike) has changed it's name to 'DRL' [Github, Official Site] and it's now open source. ZeniMax are well within their rights to "protect" the Doom brand, but I still think their lawyers are idiotic for doing this. It's not like small-time roguelike was actually competing with the real Doom.

High School's Help Desk Teaches Open Source IT Skills

The following is an adapted excerpt from chapter six of The Open Schoolhouse: Building a Technology Program to Transform Learning and Empower Students, a new book written by Charlie Reisinger, Technology Director for Penn Manor School District in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. In the book, Reisinger recounts more than 16 years of Linux and open source education success stories. Penn Manor schools saved over a million dollars by trading proprietary software for open source counterparts with its student laptop program. The budget is only part of the story. As Linux moved out of the server room and onto thousands of student laptops, a new learning community emerged. Read more

What’s New with Xen Project Hypervisor 4.8?

I’m pleased to announce the release of the Xen Project Hypervisor 4.8. As always, we focused on improving code quality, security hardening as well as enabling new features. One area of interest and particular focus is new feature support for ARM servers. Over the last few months, we’ve seen a surge of patches from various ARM vendors that have collaborated on a wide range of updates from new drivers to architecture to security. Read more