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Hardware

Devices: Daytripper and NanoPi

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Linux
Hardware

The Mission Of Coreboot - Is It About Open-Source Or Appeasing Hardware Vendors?

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

There was recently a debate on the Coreboot mailing list about the mission statement / description of this open-source BIOS/firmware replacement for systems that traditionally has liberated boards from proprietary BIOS but still on modern platforms is often pulling in a number of binary blobs.

The current description of the project as set out on Coreboot.org is "coreboot is an extended firmware platform that delivers a lightning fast and secure boot experience on modern computers and embedded systems. As an Open Source project it provides auditability and maximum control over technology."

Recently brought up though was trying to provide clarity that Coreboot isn't necessarily a complete solution for those wanting a 100% open-source firmware solution due to the likes of Intel FSP/ME and other binary components often being required for any functional support.

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Open Source and Open Hardware

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Hardware
OSS
  • Should open source software advertise?
  • Blockchain Firm Offchain Labs Releases Alpha Of Open-Source Scaling Solution

    New Jersey-based Offchain Labs has announced the launch of the Alpha 2 version of its scaling solution that can be easily integrated to any Etherum application.

    Led by a former White House Deputy Chief of Technology and a team of U.S.-based academics, Offchain Labs aims to make smart contracts more private, secure, and scalable using a combination of protocol design, incentives, and virtual machine architecture. The firm has invented Arbitrum, a blockchain agnostic Layer 2 scaling solution that incentivizes parties to agree off-chain how a virtual machine would act in order to improve transaction throughput, speed, and privacy.

  • As Crypto Markets Go Cold, Who Will Pay for Open-Source Code?

    Earlier this year IBM purchased Red Hat, the oft-referred to model for how open source can thrive, for $34 billion.

    Long the consultant to enterprises, IBM is going through a transitional period as a business and needs a boost. Red Hat’s open-source software offers IBM the ability to better compete in cloud services offered by Amazon, Microsoft and Google.

    Why is this important? Red Hat is one of the most name-checked examples of how open-source software can be successful. It is often used as an example of how championing open source can lead to business success. This is particularly pertinent to the cryptocurrency ecosystem, where open-source ethos rule the technology.

  • Fridge0: an open source hardware solar fridge with no battery requirement

    Joey Hess designed the first Fridge0 a year ago: it uses a standard chest freezer with added thermal mass, a simple controller, and a photovoltaic panel that effectively stores sunshine as coldness, obviating the need for expensive backup batteries.

  • Open Source Smart Smoker Brings The Heat (Slowly)

    Conceptually, cooking on a grill is simple enough: just crank up the flames and leave the food on long enough for it to cook through, but not so long that it turns into an inedible ember. But when smoking, the goal is actually to prevent flames entirely; the food is cooked by the circulation of hot gasses generated by smoldering wood. If you want a well-cooked and flavorful meal, you’ll need the patience and dedication to manually keep the fuel and air balanced inside the smoker for hours on end.

    [...]

    Ultimately, this project boils down to tossing a bunch of temperature sensors at the problem. The software developed by [HackersHub] takes the data collected by the five MAX6675 thermocouples and uses it to determine when to inject more air into the chamber using a PWM-controlled fan at the bottom of the smoker. As an added bonus, all those temperature sensors give the user plenty of pretty data points to look at in the companion smartphone application.

Linux 5.4 Bringing New Driver To Help SGI Systems Going Back To The SGI Origin

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Linux
Hardware

SGI systems going back to the SGI Origin servers starting some two decades ago will see better mainline kernel support with the upcoming Linux 5.4.

SGI systems going back to the Origin and continuing through have featured "1-wire devices" for interfacing with PROM devices that contain information on device part numbers, revision information, serial numbers, MAC addresses for Ethernet, and other informational details.

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PIS2 DIY Handheld PS2 Game Console is Powered by Raspberry Pi 2 SBC

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

It’s a Handheld PS2 Game Console The PIS2 is a handheld PS2 game console that has the chopped-up insides of PS2 game system stuffed into a small console, along with a display...

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Devices With Linux

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Linux
Hardware

Intel and Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Intel SGX Linux Support Bits Revved For A Twenty-Second Time

    The Software Guard Extensions (SGX) support for the Linux kernel around the memory enclaves continues to be worked on by the open-source Intel team and is now up to their twenty-second revision but it's not clear that this code is ready yet for the upcoming Linux 5.4 cycle.

    Intel has worked an excruciatingly long time on these Linux patches with the v21 patches having come out in mid-July. Now at the start of September is v22 for these patches that provide support for hardware-protected/encrypted memory regions with SGX enclaves.

  • Intel Core i9 9900KS Releasing In October With All-Core 5GHz Turbo

    Intel announced at IFA 2019 in Berlin that their Core i9 9900KS processor will be releasing next month.

    For those losing track, the Core i9 9900KS is Intel's all-core 5GHz processor as a step above the existing Core i9 9900K. On the downside, it's still a 14nm-derived Coffeelake part.

    The 5GHz all-core turbo frequency with the i9-9900KS is said to be possible with normal air cooling. The base frequency of this eight-core / sixteen thread processor will be 4.0GHz, a 400MHz increase over the 9900K. Pricing and TDP figures have yet to be announced.

    [...]

    Intel hasn't yet indicated if we'll be sampled with the 9900KS or Cascadelake-X for Linux benchmarking, but hopefully as certainly many Linux users are interested in the performance potential -- with real-world workloads, which was also a common theme for Intel's IFA 2019 talk.

Arm-based touch-panel computer has a slim, 31.7mm profile

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

Data Modul’s rugged, 10.1-inch “Slim Panel PC” runs Yocto 2.4 with Linux 4.9 on an i.MX6 with a capacitive touchscreen, dual CAN ports, Ethernet, mini-PCIe, and micro-HDMI ports.

Data Modul announced an “ultra-flat” Slim Panel PC with a 10.1-inch capacitive touchscreen that runs Linux on an 800MHz NXP i.MX6 Solo, DualLite, or Quad. The name derives from the 185 x 267mm system’s relatively svelte 31.7mm thickness.

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Raspberry Pi Model Comparison: Which One’s for You?

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Hardware

This year, the Raspberry Pi got even better thanks to the release of the Raspberry Pi 4. The new model pushes the specs even higher, making the list of things you can do with the tiny single-board computer even longer. If you’ve felt limited by past models, this is great news for your projects.

That said, not every project needs all of the power of the latest Raspberry Pi model. The older models are still quite capable and may even be better-suited to your project, depending on what you’re looking to do.

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UPower 0.99.11 and Oreboot

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Linux
Hardware
  • UPower 0.99.11 Released As v1.0 Remains Elusive

    UPower is the abstraction layer around batteries and other power devices on Linux. Even with it being years since it was known as DeviceKit-power and seeing many 0.99 updates, the UPower 1.0 release isn't there yet but at least UPower 0.99.11 is now available as their first release since February.

    UPower 0.99.11 is the project's first release since formally adopting a Code of Conduct. The CoC used is the common FreeDesktop.org Code of Conduct that is based upon the Contributor Covenant.

  • Oreboot Is Taking Shape As Rust'ed, Purely Open-Source Focused Coreboot

    Oreboot has been in development for a number of months now and while at first may have sounded like a novelty downstream of Coreboot is now proving its usefulness and taking shape.

    Oreboot similar to Libreboot is focused on targeting "truly open systems" as Coreboot without binary blobs. But in addition to taking that libre stance to hardware support in working to do away with binary blobs like the current Intel FSP or present AMD AGESA, Oreboot trades in the C code for Rust (hence the name of Coreboot without the "C").

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Linux commands to display your hardware information

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