Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Hardware

Devices: Coral mPCIe, Zynq, and ESPHome

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Using Google Coral mPCIe Card into a Compact Marvell Octeon TX Linux SBC

    Google launched Coral mPCIe and M.2 cards at the very beginning of the year. The cards integrate the company’s 4 TOPS Edge TPU used for low power edge AI applications to bring the solutions to boards with mPCIe or M.2 sockets.

    Those are just hardware sockets that are optionally connected to USB, PCIe, I2C, etc… so you have to make sure the socket on your board exposes PCIe Gen2 x1. If you worry about compatibility, it’s good to get a board that’s known to work, and one of those is Gateworks Newport GW6903 SBC that offers two mPCIe sockets and features Marvell Octeon TX dual or quad-core Armv8 processor coupled with up to 4GB RAM.

  • Zynq UltraScale+ Arm FPGA FZ3 Deep Learning Accelerator Card Supports Baidu Brain AI Tools

    FZ3 card runs PetaLinux, and supports Baidu PaddlePaddle deep learning AI framework, as well as Baidu Brain AI tools such as EasyDL, AI Studio, and EasyEdge. Those enable the development of deep learning applications such as smart cameras, AI Edge embedded PCs, AI robots, smart cars, intelligent electronic scale, autonomous UAV, and more.

  • Simple IoT Devices using ESPHome

    ESPHome is a build and deployment system that takes all of the manual coding work out of integrating custom Internet of Things (IoT) devices with Home Assistant. It advertises support for not only the ESP8266, but also its big-brother the ESP32 and even various ESP8266-based off-the-shelf consumer devices from Sonoff. ESPHome achieves a code-free integration by implementing the auto-discovery protocols necessary for Home Assistant to pull the features of the device into the hub with just a few clicks. Wiring up an ESP8266 to the desired hardware, and defining that hardware properly in the configuration, is all that is needed to enable it in the hub.

    For hardware wired to an ESP8266 to be used with ESPHome, it must first be supported by an ESPHome component. The ESPHome project's website lists the various hardware it understands how to work with, from sensors to displays. While the collection of IoT device components is not as comprehensive as one could imagine, ESPHome does offer many of the common ones used in smart homes. The project's last release, v1.14.0 in November 2019, included 24 new components.

    [...]

    The ESPHome project has a healthy community supporting it with 132 contributors and 67 releases to date, including the latest v1.14.0 release. The project itself operates under a dual licensing model where the C++ code is released under GPLv3 and the Python code is released under an MIT license. Those interested in contributing (both documentation or code) can review the contributor guidelines for how best to get involved. There doesn't appear to be a mailing list for the project, but there is a Discord channel available.

TrueNAS 12.0-BETA1 Release Announcement

Filed under
Hardware
BSD

FreeNAS (and now TrueNAS) Fans! I'm pleased to announce the availability of our first BETA1 for the upcoming 12.0 TrueNAS CORE / Enterprise release.

Read more

Also: TrueNAS 12 Beta 1 Released With Much Improved ZFS, Better AMD Ryzen CPU Support

Review of the HP Pavilion 14-ce0830nd

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews
SUSE

Would I recommend the HP Pavilion 14-ce0830nd? To be honest, its a mixed bag on openSUSE. Installation of openSUSE Leap 15.2 was very easy. And installation of a dual boot system with Windows 10 was easy as well. The laptop has an attractive look and feel. The display, speakers, keyboard and external ports are all good. The touchpad is too sensitive. The machine has enough RAM, enough storage and the hard drives are performant. The Intel CPU/GPU is great. Which means that this is a great machine for multitasking. The gaming performance on the Intel GPU on openSUSE Leap 15.2 is good enough to play various open source games on medium/high settings.

Read more

Linux-Friendly Devices

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

CutiePi tablet based on Raspberry Pi CM3+ starts at $169

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

On Kickstarter: a $169 and up, open source “CutiePi” tablet that runs a Linux- and Qt-based stack on a quad-core, 1.2GHz Raspberry Pi CM3+ Lite. You also get an 8-inch, 1280 x 800 touchsceen, a 5000mAh battery, and USB and micro-HDMI ports.

Taiwanese startup CutiePi, Which has been teasing details about its Raspberry Pi Compute Module based CutiePi tablet since last August, will go live on Kickstarter on Tuesday. The 8-inch tablet starts at a super early bird price of $169 and features a CutiePi UI shell based on Qt and Raspberry Pi OS (the latest version of Raspbian). The tablet is OSHWA-certified for open source hardware compliance and will also be available in a PCB-only package.

Read more

Now firmware can depend on available client features

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

At the moment we just blindly assume the capabilities of the front-end client when installing firmware. We can somewhat work around this limitation by requiring a new enough fwupd daemon version, but the GUI client software may be much older than the fwupd version or just incomplete. If you maintain a text or graphical client that uses fwupd to deploy updates then there’s an additional API call I’d like you to start using so we can fix this limitation.

This would allow, for instance, the firmware to specify that it requires the client to be able to show a runtime detach image. This would not be set by a dumb command line tool using FwupdClient, but would be set by a GUI client that is capable of downloading a URL and showing a PNG to the user.

Read more

Also: LVFS Serves Up Over 17 Million Firmware Files To Linux Users

MontaVista adds continuous integration support

Filed under
Hardware

MontaVista announced v3.1 of its Carrier Grade eXpress 3.1 embedded Linux distro based on Linux 5.4 LTS and Yocto 3.1 LTS. CGX 3.1 improves support for CI/CD and is more closely aligned with the Yocto Project.

MontaVista Software has upgraded its Yocto Project based Carrier Grade eXpress to version 3.1 with a focus on Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment (CI/CD) support. The pioneering embedded Linux firm also announced greater alignment with the Yocto Project development model and vowed increased support for MontaVista’s free, completely open source OpenCGX version.

Read more

Also: Tiny NanoPi NEO3 SBC Targets Networked Storage with GbE and USB 3.0

Linux in Devices/Embedded: Bootlin, Texas Instruments and Garmin

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Bootlin at the Embedded Linux Conference 2020

    Bootlin has been a participant at the Embedded Linux Conference for many years, and despite the special conditions this year, we will again be participating to this online event, from June 29 to July 1.

  • J721E DRA829/TDA4VM/AM752x – Texas Instruments Cortex-A72 based Monster SoC’s

    Texas Instruments unveiled their first 64-bit processor in 2018 with TI AM654 “Keystone III” quad-core Arm Cortex-A53 + dual lockstep Cortex-R5F processor designed for general embedded and industrial applications.

    The company is now working on a more powerful processor with J721E SoC with Cortex-A72 cores belonging to the K3 Multicore SoC architecture platform appearing in TI Linux git repository. Ti J721E is a monster of an SoC, not necessarily in terms of CPU processing power, but it has an amazing amount of features and peripherals.

  • OpenStreetMap for Garmin Fenix

    I’ve recently bought a Garmin Fenix Multisport Smartwatch. The watch offers support for navigation and maps. By default it came with some topo maps for Europe. However I wanted to use more detailed maps from OpenStreetMap.

    [...]

    Also there had been problems with the map on fenix. The draw order really matters and I needed to draw forests earlier as they didn’t show up on smartwatch, but worked fine when loaded in QMapShack. My current problem is that building aren’t rendered on the device. The question is if we really want them or leave them out.

    [...]

    Just download the file and copy it to the GARMIN folder on the device using MTP. In case you want a map for your region you can build it yourself using the MDE.

Open Firmware at System76

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • System76 Oryx Pro Linux laptop gets Intel Core i7-10875H CPU and Open Firmware

    We recently told you that the thin and light Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition has finally started shipping with Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. While that is certainly cool, the reality is, Linux-focused companies like System76 were shipping out computers with the newest Ubuntu LTS pre-installed way before that. In fact, System76 even offers the option of its own operating system that is based on Ubuntu 20.04. Called "Pop!_OS," the Linux distribution adds many beneficial tweaks and enhancements to improve the overall user experience.

    Today, System76 refreshes its popular Oryx Pro laptop, and you can choose between Ubuntu 20.04 and Pop!_OS 20.04 (I would recommend the latter). The powerful notebook (with 15.6-inch or 17.3-inch display options) now comes with a cutting-edge 10th Gen Intel Core i7-10875H CPU which offers an impressive 8 cores and 16 threads. You also get an NVIDIA RTX 20-series GPU which can work in conjunction with the Intel graphics thanks to the smart graphic-switching capabilities baked into Pop!_OS.

  • Oryx Pro is the first System76 laptop with Coreboot, Open Controller Firmware and NVIDIA

    System76 have today revealed a refreshed Oryx Pro laptop. The first to come from System76 that features both their System76 Open Firmware, System76 Embedded Controller Firmware and NVIDIA together. This was hinted at recently, when System76 engineer Jeremy Soller had mentioned they were working on it on Twitter.

    Quite an exciting development, having a top Linux hardware vendor bring open source firmware that's built from coreboot and the EDK boot-loader to more models and with an NVIDIA GPU too so there's plenty of power involved. System76 said it "means that users get lightning fast boot times, enhanced security, and firmware updates accessible through their operating system" plus "open source firmware gives a look inside the
    code, so users can keep track of what’s happening with their data".

Devices/Embedded: MontaVista, Silicon Labs, Bamboo Systems

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • MontaVista Launches Carrier Grade eXpress (CGX) 3.1 and Steps Up Yocto Alignment

    MontaVista® Software, LLC,, a leader in commercial Embedded Linux® products and services, today announced the availability of MontaVista's Carrier Grade eXpress (CGX) 3.1 in Q3 of 2020. The CGX 3.1 release will include the baseline of components from Yocto 3.1, commercialized by MontaVista's Carrier-Grade build and test infrastructure.

  • $99 EFR32xG22 Wireless Gecko Starter Kit Offers Low-Cost Zigbee Development Platform

    Silicon Labs has just launched a low-cost Bluetooth, Zigbee, and proprietary wireless development kit with the $99 EFR32xG22 Wireless Gecko Starter Kit (WSTK).

    This WSTK includes two +6 dBm radio boards, matching network, and PCB antennas for +6 dBm output power in the 2.4 GHz band, as well as on-board J-Link debugger. Previously you had to purchase the $479 EFR32xG21 Wireless Gecko Starter Kit to get access to the Zigbee SDK in order to get started with development, and the new starter kit makes it possible to get access to the same software resources and documentation for around $100.

  • Bamboo Systems B1000N 1U Server Features up to 128 64-bit Arm Cores, 512GB RAM

    SolidRun CEx7-LX2160A COM Express module with NXP LX2160A 16-core Arm Cortex A72 processor has been found in the company’s Janux GS31 Edge AI server in combination with several Gyrfalcon AI accelerators. But now another company – Bamboo Systems – has now launched its own servers based on up to eight CEx7-LX2160A module providing 128 Arm Cortex-A72 cores, support for up to 512GB DDR4 ECC, up to 64TB NVMe SSD storage, and delivering a maximum of 160Gb/s network bandwidth in a single rack unit.

    [...]

    B1008N costs about $80,000 to operate over 3 years, against around $155,000 for the AWS and over $250,000 for the Intel Xeon servers. The server costs are quite straightforward as it’s the one-time cost of the hardware or AWS subscriptions over three years. Bamboo Systems explains B1008N network costs are 50% less than Intel as traffic is contained within the system thanks to the built-in Layer 3 switches. However, I don’t understand the higher storage costs for the Intel servers.

  • ZOTAC ZBOX CI622 Nano Barebone, Fanless Comet Lake Mini PC Launched for $400

    The mini PC ships with a WiFi antenna, a 65W power adapter, a VESA mount, a USB flash drive with OS drivers, a warranty card, a user manual, and a quick install guide. There’s no OS since the system is barebone meaning you’d have to buy RAM and storage separately, then install your own preferred operating system. The company only lists Windows 10 as being supported, so Linux would have to be tested first.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

THE LATEST LINUX – ON A FLOPPY IN A 486!

If you have ever studied the early history of the GNU/Linux operating system in its many forms, you’ll have read that [Linus Torvalds] developed his first kernel for his Intel 386-based computer. Though the 386 architecture is now ancient, the current Linux kernel can still be compiled for it and many distributions still maintain an i386 branch to provide broad compatibility for later machines able to run i386 code. But what if you were to take a current Linux kernel and stick it on a floppy in a machine from the early 1990s, with meagre RAM? [Fozztex] did just that, with not a 386 but a 486, sporting what would have been an impressive for the time 36MB of RAM. You can watch it in action in the video below the break. A recent Linux kernel is rarely if ever compiled for something as small as a floppy disk, so getting one to boot from such ancient media appeared to be a challenge. It was possible though with the tinyconfig make option, and after finding a small enough root filesystem courtesy of Aboriginal Linux, a bootable floppy was created. It’s not entirely useful and its sole purpose was to see whether Linux could see a large hard drive on the 486, but it’s still a version 5.6 Linux kernel booting from floppy on an ancient computer. Never complain that your Raspberry Pi Zero is slow again, we’ve come a long way! Read more

What’s New In Linux Mint 20 “Ulyana”

Linux Mint 20 is based on Ubuntu 20.04 “Focal Fossa” and Linux Kernel 5.4. Ulyana is a long-term support release, will receive security updates until 2025. The first big improvement in Ulyana is the better multi-monitor & HiDPI support. Linux Mint 20 supports fractional scaling. If you have connected multiple monitors, each monitor can have different scaling value from 100% to 200%. It is something that was not possible before. If the user connects a 4K monitor and enables HiDPI mode, it’s easier to adjust the scaling of the monitor to get everything sharp and crystal clear. At the same time, on non-HiDPI compatible monitors, set a different resolution to get applications windows fit into the screen. Read more

LibreOffice Board Assures the Community That it Will Remain Free Software Forever

LibreOffice 7.0 will be released in soon and you may see it labelled as Personal Edition. This labelling and its tagline have created a sort of controversy. Read more