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Hardware

LTE-equipped automotive gateway runs Ubuntu on Bay Trail

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

Kontron’s rugged “EvoTrac G102” is an in-vehicle cellular gateway that runs Ubuntu on a quad-core Atom E3845, and offers 64GB eMMC, GbE, CAN, 2x USB, and a 3G/4G module with GPS.

Kontron unveiled the EvoTrac G102 last month, and earlier this month announced that it will act as the control box for Hyliion’s 6X4HE “intelligent electric hybrid system for Class 8 trucks and trailers.” The 6X4HE provides regenerative braking design to capture power for fuel savings of up to 30 percent,” says Kontron.

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Also: GPD Pocket 2 Launches This Summer with a Faster Processor

15.6-inch Apollo Lake panel PC supports Fedora, Ubuntu, and Yocto Linux

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

DFI’s “KS-156AL” industrial touch-panel PC runs Linux or Windows on Apollo Lake and features a 15.6-inch, 1366 x 768 touchscreen with IP65 protection and shock and vibration resistance.

DFI’s Linux-friendly, 15.6-inch KS-156AL panel PC is based on its AL171 mini-ITX board, which was announced a year ago along with the similar AL173 which is otherwise identical except for the addition of wide-range power. The KS-156AL was recently announced along with a similarly Intel Apollo Lake based, 7-inch KS070-AL panel PC. The 7-inch KS070-AL is supported only with Windows, although it’s based on a 3.5-inch, “coming soon” AL551 SBC that also supports Ubuntu. The two systems are designed for factory automation, transportation, and other embedded applications.

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Also: Compact Kaby Lake embedded PC has SATA, M.2, and mSATA

Intel and OpenIoT Summit EU

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Hardware

Intel in Linux 4.19 and MIPS

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Intel Begins Queuing Graphics Driver Improvements For Linux 4.19

    While the Linux 4.18 kernel merge window isn't even over until the end of the week followed by about eight weeks worth of testing before that kernel version will debut as stable, Intel open-source developers have already sent in their first pull request to DRM-Next of material they would like to begin staging for Linux 4.19.

    Intel's OTC developers are usually quite punctual in queuing up their tested work in DRM-Next for the next kernel cycle while even for their standards this is quite early with there being several days left to the current merge window.

  • Linux Kernel Patches Appear For A Line Of Intel MIPS SoCs

    It appears Intel is launching a line of SoCs based on the MIPS architecture.

    Hitting the kernel mailing list overnight is a set of kernel patches for bringing up the Intel GRX500 SoCs, which are based on the MIPS interAptiv design. MIPS interAptiv processor cores are based on a 32-bit, multi-core design and have been available the past few years. Background information on interAptiv is available from MIPS.com.

Zynthian Open Source Raspberry Pi Synthesiser

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Linux
Hardware

Musicians may be interested in a new fully open source Raspberry Pi synthesiser aptly named the Zynthian which provides a “new class of machine” described as a “swiss army knife of synthesis, equipped with multiple engines, filters and effects”. The Raspberry Pi synthesiser is completely configurable and upgradable and offers an open platform for Sound Synthesis based on the awesome Raspberry Pi mini PC and Linux operating system making the synthesiser fully hackable.

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Jetson based embedded vision kit has three 4K cameras

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Linux
Hardware

E-con’s “e-CAM120_TRICUTX2” is a camera system powered by a Linux-driven Jetson TX1 or TX2 module that features three 13-megapixel, [email protected] cameras via 4-lane MIPI-CSI-2 interfaces.

Last September, E-con Systems launched an e-CAM30_HEXCUTX2 system with six 3.4-megapixel, HD cameras. Now it has followed up with an e-CAM120_TRICUTX2 camera rig with only three cameras but each with higher [email protected] resolution via 13-megapixel technology.

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First look: Huawei MateBook X Pro with Ubuntu 18.04 Linux

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

The Huawei MateBook X Pro is a pretty nice little laptop, featuring a 13.9 inch, 3000 x 2000 pixel touchscreen display with super-slim bezels, an all-metal chassis, and support for up ton an Intel Core i7-8550U processor, 16GB of RAM, 512GB of storage, and NVIDIA GeForce MX150 graphics.

Huawei recently announced that the MateBook X Pro is coming to America, and it’s up for pre-order from B&H.

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Alan Pope: KDE Slimbook 2 Review

Filed under
KDE
Hardware
Reviews

The kind folks at Slimbook recently sent me the latest generation of their ultrabook-style laptop line for review, the KDE Slimbook 2. You can hear my thoughts on the latest episode of the Ubuntu Podcast, released on June 7th 2018.

Slimbook are a small laptop vendor based in Spain. All the laptops ship with KDE Neon as the default operating system. In addition to their hardware, they also contribute to and facilitate local Free Software events in their area. I was sent the laptop only for review purposes. There's no other incentive provided, and Slimbook didn't see this blog post before I published it.

Being a small vendor, they don't have the same buying power with OEM vendors as other big name laptop suppliers. This is reflected in the price you pay. You're supporting a company who are themselves supporting Free Software developers and communities.

If you're after the cheapest possible laptop, and don't care about its origin or the people behind the device, then maybe this laptop isn't for you. However, if you like to vote with your wallet, then the KDE Slimbook should absolutely be on your list to seriously consider.

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2018 reader survey of 116 open-spec Linux/Android SBCs

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Android
Linux
Hardware
  • 2018 reader survey of 116 open-spec Linux/Android SBCs

    Vote for your favorites from our freshly updated catalog of 116 sub-$200, hacker-friendly SBCs that run Linux or Android, and you could win one of 15 prizes. An embedded engineer awakening from a 20-year coma might find today’s hacker board scene surprising to say the least.

  • Catalog of 116 open-spec hacker boards

    This catalog accompanies our June 2018 reader survey of hacker-friendly, open-spec SBCs. Here, we provide recently updated descriptions, specs, pricing, and links to details for all 116 SBCs.

    Our June 2018 round-up of hacker-friendly single board computers comprises three resources: an overview of recent SBC market trends; this catalog; and a Google docs spreadsheet that tabulates the boards’ key features. Click on the introduction link below to find the link to the SurveyMonkey site where you can vote for your favorite boards and win a chance at some free SBC prizes.

Devices: Fuchsia, Jolla, and Udoo Bolt

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Fuchsia Friday: Google is working on two unusual Fuchsia device prototypes

    Inside of the Zircon repo, is a maintained list of hardware vendors and devices from those vendors that are compatible with the kernel. Some of these vendors include standard ones like Intel (for the NUC and Pixelbook), chip makers like Broadcom and Amlogic, and companies like Khadas and 96Boards who make development hardware. Google themselves are included are vendors in this list with three devices, Gauss, Astro and Machina. We’ll come back to Machina soon™.

  • CCW & The Power of German Community

    Critical Communications World or CCW for short is an international event held in a different part of the world each year. This year the event took place in Berlin on May 15th & 16th. At the event, dozens of companies from all over the globe gather to showcase their critical communication solutions and products, be it services, hardware, software or apps. We were situated at the Critical Communications Finland booth.

    Jolla, who’s flexible, reliable and independent solution: Sailfish OS, is intrinsically private and secure, is highly relevant at such events.

    [...]

    While walking around the event and discussing with the different exhibitors it was clear that participation in this “ecosystem” requires versatile and scalable solutions integrated to long service life infrastructure such as buses, ambulances, drones, tablets and phones. Sailfish 3 brings more scalability with support for feature phone and PDA type devices in addition to existing form factors such as Phones, Tablets and Watches.

    Addressing privacy and security is important to the ecosystem and SailfishOS provides a solid solution for a secure and privacy-respecting product out of the box. You can then plug in features such as secure VPN communication to the Sailfish OS frameworks either with your own, or already provided, technologies. With Sailfish OS you are not locked to our cloud services and servers, but instead you have the freedom to choose a provider of your own. Many companies at the event commented that when they selected a platform they had to first strip down certain services and even change some components in order to reach the privacy requirements.

  • Udoo Bolt is first Ryzen V1000 based hacker board

    Seco has won KS funding for its open-spec, $229 “Udoo Bolt” SBC, which runs Linux or Windows on AMD’s Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC. The SBC supports up to 4x displays, and offers SATA III, 3x M.2, 2x HDMI 2.0, and Arduino and Grove expansion.

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More in Tux Machines

Games: Riot Games, Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation, Dead Cells

  • Riot Games' anti-cheat software for League also targets Linux users
    This week Riot Games implemented a new anti-cheat software for the game that is meant to limit the number of players who use third-party programs while playing. Most of these programs help users cheat in-game, such as by inputting movement commands for a player to allow them to dodge enemy skillshots. Unfortunately for players who run Linux as their operating system, the new anti-cheat also targets it as a third-party program, preventing them from playing League. Many players took to Reddit and other forums to protest the change, even creating a petition for Riot to add Linux compatibility.
  • Riot Games New Anti-Cheat Could Wipe Out League of Legends Linux Player Base
    ​Riot Games has been working on a new anti-cheat system for League of Legends. There are reports that this update would make the game unplayable for Linux users, because it would make the game incompatible with virtual environments, something Linux users have to employ to play the game.
  • A small but nice update on Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation and Linux support
    We've been waiting quite a while for any real news on the Linux port of Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation [Official Site]. While we still don't know when, we do know it's still happening.
  • Dead Cells, a 'RogueVania' now has a Beta available for Linux
    Dead Cells mixes in elements of a Rogue-lite with a MetroidVania to create an interesting mix and it's now available on Linux with a Beta. I did notice in the comments of the previous article, that people were debating the choice of article title. I said it was a "rogue-lite metroidvania action-platformer", which was obviously a bit wrong. They've actually coined their own term for it, calling it a "RogueVania".

"Microsoft may find the developers it just paid so much to reach slipping from its grasp."

  • Mixed Reaction
  • After Github purchase, Microsoft remains a relatively untrusted open source player to some
  • What is GitHub?
    GitHub is now the de facto home of open-source software. But Microsoft’s acquisition reignited a debate over the platform’s centrality. Microsoft assures users the service is safe under its stewardship, but many are wary. When Mr Ballmer spoke of developers, he had a specific sort in mind: those using Microsoft’s tools to build projects for Microsoft products. He once called open-source Linux a “cancer”, which would spread uncontrollably. In a sense, his words proved prophetic: today, open-source software is everywhere, from websites to financial markets to self-driving cars. Under Mr Nadella’s leadership, Microsoft has embraced open-source development. In buying GitHub it hopes to gain the trust of developers it once spurned. But some wonder if the change is complete, or if Microsoft will use its newly bought dominance of open-source hosting to push its own products. Alternatives to GitHub—some themselves open-source—wait in the wings. If it is not careful, Microsoft may find the developers it just paid so much to reach slipping from its grasp.

Making Free Software Suffer Using New Laws

  • Free software is at risk in the EU -- take action now
    Members of the European Parliament want to turn upload platforms like GitLab into "censorship machines" that require user-uploaded materials to be monitored and automatically filtered, a process which would prevent modified and reused code from being uploaded. This provision is covered under Article 13 of the Copyright Directive. If Article 13, embedded within the proposal, becomes official policy, it will be impossible for developers to build off of one another's code -- which is not only a blow to the collaborative development of free software, but a push against the basic freedoms of free software. Software isn't free unless it can be modified and shared. Article 13 will affect all users of free software -- as development of free software suffers, the quality and availability of updates, new features, and new programs will also suffer.
  • Open Source Industry Australia Says Zombie TPP Could Destroy Free Software Licensing
    Without the ability to enforce compliance through the use of injunctions, open source licenses would once again be pointless. Although the OSIA is concerned about free software in Australia, the same logic would apply to any TPP-11 country. It would also impact other nations that joined the Pacific pact later, as the UK is considering (the UK government seems not to have heard of the gravity theory for trade). It would presumably apply to the US if it did indeed rejoin the pact, as has been mooted. In other words, the impact of this section on open source globally could be significant. It's worth remembering why this particular article is present in TPP. It grew out of concerns that nations like China and Russia were demanding access to source code as a pre-requisite of allowing Western software companies to operate in their countries. Article 14.17 was designed as a bulwark against such demands. It's unlikely that it was intended to destroy open source licensing too, although some spotted early on that this was a risk. And doubtless a few big software companies will be only too happy to see free software undermined in this way. Unfortunately, it's probably too much to hope that the Australian Senate Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence & Trade will care about or even understand this subtle software licensing issue. The fate of free software in Australia will therefore depend on whether TPP-11 comes into force, and if so, what judges think Article 14.17 means.

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