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Hardware

16 Places To Buy A Linux Laptop With Linux Preloaded

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

Are you looking for Linux laptops? Do you want a Linux system without having to pay a Microsoft tax? The hardest part of using Linux is to find out the correct hardware. Hardware compatibility and drivers can be a big issue. But where one can find Linux desktops or Laptop for sale? Here are sixteen places to buy a preinstalled Linux Desktop and Laptop.

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Devices/Embedded: Win Enterprises and Raspberry Pi 4

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Hardware
  • Win Enterprises unveils Atom-based LAN gateway and compact SBC

    Win Enterprises unveiled a fanless “PL-82000” networking gateway with 6x GbE and 2x SFP ports based on an Atom C3000. It also launched a Raspberry Pi sized “MB-5000” SBC that runs Ubuntu or Win 10 on Intel Apollo Lake.

    We tend to forget Win Enterprises because as its name suggests, the company typically sticks to Windows-supported products. Yet, they have increasingly produced barebones products without listed OS support, such as the new PL-82000 networking appliance, as well as Linux supported systems such as the MB-5000 SBC announced back in June. (In 2017, we covered an Intel Bay Trail based MB-80580 SBC and Win IoT-380 Gateway with Linux support.)

  • Raspberry Pi 4 PCI Express: It actually works! USB3, SATA… GPUs?

    Recently, Tomasz Mloduchowski posted a popular article on his blog detailing the steps he undertook to get access to the hidden PCIe interface of Raspberry Pi 4: the first Raspberry Pi to include PCIe in its design. After seeing his post, and realizing I was meaning to go buy a Raspberry Pi 4, it just seemed natural to try and replicate his results in the hope of taking it a bit further. I am known for Raspberry Pi Butchery, after all.

  • Raspberry Pi 4 B+ - PCI Express

    Why did I do it? Because I wanted to see if it can be done. Because Raspberry Pi 4 might be the cheapest device that is PCIe capable after a relatively minor modification (if I didn't lift the capacitors when desoldering the VL805, this is literally 12 soldering points). That, in turn, can be quite handy for developing own PCIe cores for various FPGA based experiments.

    I'm sharing it to allow people to learn from this - and to dispel the myth that PCIe is somehow out of reach of hobbyists due to some concerns over signal integrity or complexities. Stay tuned for more Pi4/PCIe experimentation!

today's howtos and hardware news

Filed under
Hardware
HowTos
  • Blue Mail now available for Linux
  • How to Enable EPEL Repository on CentOS 8 and RHEL 8 Server
  • How to set up Cairo dock on the Linux desktop
  • Open source Raspberry Pi microscope project

    Micropalaeontologist Martin Tetard has been developing a Raspberry Pi microscope aptly named the microscoPI. The Raspberry Pi based microscope can capture, process, and store images and image analysis results. Watch the video embedded below to learn more about the unique Raspberry Pi microscope, which features a rechargeable battery secured under the base of the microscope, making the system completely portable and measuring less than 30 cm in height.

  • Open Source Hardware Trends, Arm Takes a Different Tack

    The open-source movement that has driven software innovation is now creating a buzz in the microprocessor realm, thanks to the growing popularity of open-source microprocessor instruction set architecture RISC-V. Although the term “open source” conveys sentiments such as research sharing and community building, leading semiconductor IP provider Arm, which supports 95 percent of smartphone embedded processors, is not a fan.

    Synced recently sat down with Rhonda Dirvin, who is Arm’s senior director of Embedded, IoT and Automotive Marketing. Dirvin believes today’s open source hardware landscape is not as simple and straightforward as it may seem: “We’re starting to see some people say free is not free. Because at the end of the day they have to look at what it takes to verify that and what it takes to implement the instruction or architecture. You don’t have the whole ecosystem out there that supports it the way that you do with Arm or some of the other more established vendors.”

DIY, modular MNT Reform Laptop gets spec bump as it inches toward reality

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

It’s been a few years since developer Lukas Hartmann and designer Ana Dantes unveiled their plans for a DIY, modular laptop designed to run free and open source software.

Since then, the folks behind the MNT Reform project created a small number of early prototypes, introduced new hardware with beefier specs and some other improvements, and have begun producing prototypes of version 2 of the laptop.

Once everything is up to snuff, the plan is to launch another crowdfunding campaign for folks interested in purchasing their own MNT Reform 2 laptop — but since the design files will be open source, there’s nothing stopping anyone from downloading the necessary files and assembling their own (if they also want to go through the trouble of sourcing all the components including a custom PCB).

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System76 Laptops Now Available with Open Source Firmware

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Hardware

The open source centric Laptop manufacturer introduced two models with open source firmware.

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8 of the Best IoT Projects Using Arduino

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Hardware

If you’re an electronics hobbyist, chances are you’ve heard of the Arduino. It’s a tiny computer that you can use to do surprisingly complex things. It also happens to be behind a fair number of Internet of Things projects.

While some people reach a for Raspberry Pi or something even more powerful, an Arduino or Arduino Uno might be all you need. We’ve put together a list of IoT projects that prove this to be true.

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Also: py-videocore6 Raspberry Pi 4 GPGPU Python Library Leverages VideoCore 6 GPU

RK3328-based industrial SBC eases Raspbian porting

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Novasom’s new M7+ version of its Pi-like, RK3328 based SBC-M7 board adds RS485, power over USB, an FPC connector for HDMI, and a library that lets Pi users recompile Raspbian apps for use with its industrial RASPMOOD stack.

In February, Novasom Industries launched its Linux-powered, Rockchip RK3328 based SBC-M7 single board computer, which Novasom now calls the Novasom M7, along with an SBC-M8 board based on a Snapdragon 410E. Now, Novasom has followed customer feedback to upgrade the somewhat Raspberry Pi-like Novasom M7 with a Novasom M7+ (or M7Plus) model that provides a variety of hardware and software improvements.

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Ubuntu Core: Raspberry Pi 4 and Beyond

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Hardware
Ubuntu
  • Attaching a CPU fan to a RPi running Ubuntu Core

    When I purchased my Raspberry Pi4 I kind of expected it to operate under similar conditions as all the former Pi’s I owned …

    So I created an Ubuntu Core image for it (you can find info about this at Support for Raspberry Pi 4 on the snapcraft forum)

    Runnig lxd on this image off a USB3.1 SSD to build snap packages (it is faster than the Ubuntu Launchpad builders that are used for build.snapcraft.io, so a pretty good device for local development), I quickly noticed the device throttles a lot once it gets a little warmer, so I decided I need a fan.

  • A reference architecture for secure IoT device Management

    One of the key benefits of IoT is the ability to monitor and control connected devices remotely. This allows operators to interact with connected devices in a feedback loop, resulting in accelerated decisions. These interactions are mediated by a device management interface, which presents data in a user-friendly UI. The interface also serves as a client to remotely control devices in the field. Device management is, therefore, a key component of IoT solution stacks, with a significant impact on the ROI of such deployments.

    However, there is no one size fits all when it comes to device management solutions. IoT solutions are deployed in various contexts. The purpose, the devices, and the users involved vary from one deployment to another, even within the same industry. It is, therefore, challenging to find a ready-made device management solution perfectly suitable to any given deployment.

    Security is the critical requirement that these deployments invariably share, for it must be implemented in line with the best practices. Secure authentication and communication encryption are indispensable for the management of mission-critical device fleets.

Linux 5.5 To Advertise RDPRU Support For AMD Zen 2 CPUs Via /proc/cpuinfo

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware

RDPRU is one of the new instruction set extensions of AMD "Zen 2" CPUs that is for reading a processor register that is typically limited to privilege level zero. RDPRU allows for reading select registers at any privilege level. With Linux 5.5, the RDPRU presence will be advertised by the CPU features.

It's still up to user-space for making use of RDPRU, but for software checking from /proc/cpuinfo to see the availability of RDPRU as a supported CPU feature, Linux 5.5 is finally set to advertise it for the Zen 2 CPUs with the Ryzen 3000 series and AMD EPYC 7002 series.

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Also: RadeonSI Adds Zeroing vRAM Workaround To Help Rocket League Players

Devices With Linux Optional

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • 3.5-inch SBC cranks it up with Whiskey Lake

    Ibase’s 3.5-inch “IB919” SBC runs Ubuntu or Windows on an 8th Gen Whiskey Lake-UE CPU with up to 32GB DDR4, 2x SATA, 2x M.2, 2x GbE, 4x USB 3.1 Gen2, and triple display support.

    Ibase unveiled a 3.5-inch SBC with Intel’s up to quad-core 8th Gen Whiskey Lake-UE with 15-year guaranteed availability. The Ubuntu-ready IB919 follows an earlier 6th/7th Gen U-series IB917 3.5-inch SBC with U-series options limited to dual cores. The IB919 adds a USB Type-C port with DP support and updates USB to 10Gbps USB 3.1 Gen2. It also switches from mini-PCIe to M.2 expansion, among other enhancements.

  • Fanless, Whiskey Lake mini-tower starts at $220

    Shuttle is launching a fanless, $220 and up “DS10U” mini-tower that runs Linux or Windows on an 8th Gen Whiskey Lake-U with 2.5-inch SATA, 2x GbE, 4x USB 3.1, 4x USB 2.0, triple displays, and 2x M.2.

    Shuttle Computer Group, which launched an Apollo Lake based EN01 mini-PC earlier this year, has now introduced a slightly larger mini-tower with a more powerful 8th Gen Whiskey Lake U-series processor. The DS10U was revealed by various sites such as FanlessTech in August and was formally announced without a price on Sep. 10. Yesterday, Android PCTV reported that it would go on sale over the next few days for $220 in stores including Amazon. The Amazon search page for the system is still coming up empty, but we’ll keep trying.

  • Lynx expands NXP processor support for its LynxSecure Separation Kernel Hypervisor

    Lynx Software Technologies, an innovator in modern platform software technologies, today announced that it has expanded its LynxSecure® Separation Kernel Hypervisor support for Arm-based NXP Semiconductors processor architectures.

    Lynx has ported LynxSecure onto the NXP QorIQ Layerscape 1046A (LS1046A) multicore communication processor integrating quad 64-bit Arm® Cortex®-A72 cores. LynxSecure support for NXP’s LS1046A joins the already existing support for NXP S32V234™ MPSoC.

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