Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Hardware

Devices: Librem/Purism, Rockchip, and Axiomtek

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

  • Reflashing the Librem 5

    Reflashing the Librem 5 is the best way to remove your personal data and put the phone back into factory defaults.

    Warning, this procedure will completely erase everything on the device! Make a backup beforehand!

    The Librem 5 gets reflashed from a separate 64-bit x86 computer running PureOS (or booted from the live PureOS disk).

  • Getting Purism News – Purism

    We have a lot of irons in the fire at Purism whether it’s hardware development like the Librem 5, Librem 5 USA, or Librem 14, new products like the Librem Mini v2, or the wide range of software projects we maintain at https://source.puri.sm/. As a result, each week there is news on at least one of these fronts.

    We often get questions about the status of various projects, in particular from customers who are part of a crowdfunding campaign who want to know the answer to the all-important question: when will I get my device? In this post we will cover all the different ways you can stay up to date on Purism news.

  • Rockchip RV1126 AI Camera SoC features 2.0 TOPS NPU, promises 250ms fast boot

    Rockchip RV1126 EVB V13 can help with evaluation and early development, but I could not find limited information includes a boot log showing it running Linux 4.9.111.

  • PoE-enabled Apollo Lake system triggers machine vision

    Axiomtek’s compact “MVS100-323-FL” machine vision computer combines Apollo Lake with 3x GbE ports — 2x with PoE — plus lighting controls, trigger I/O, isolated DIO, and mini-PCIe.

    Axiomtek has previously launched vision I/O computers based on Intel’s 7th Gen Kaby Lake with products like the MVS900-511-FL, IPS962-512-PoE, and IPS960-511-PoE. The new MVS100-323-FL is a far more compact system with a slower, but more energy efficient Apollo Lake processor.

    [...]

    The MVS100-323-FL is powered by Intel’s quad-core x5-E3940, clocked at 1.6GHz. No OS support was listed, but Linux and Windows are almost certainly supported. Axiomtek’s AMS.AXView software is also available.

Open Hardware: Raspberry Pi and Arduino

Filed under
Hardware

  • Introducing the Raspberry Pi Pico Microcontroller - IoT Tech Trends

    The Raspberry Pi Foundation comes through again with another innovative device. Already well-known for its series of single-board computers, the company has announced the Raspberry Pi Pico, a microcontroller that costs a shockingly low $4. Adding to the interest, the company is using its own RP2040 chip for it, meaning it’s making its own silicon, just like Apple with its M1.

  •  

  • Kernel 5.10.9 compiled for Pi4

    EasyOS for the Raspberry Pi4, version 2.6, has the 5.10.4 Linux kernel. I have now compiled the 5.10.9 kernel, that will be used in the next release of Easy.

  •  

  • Fixed compile of Samba without krb5 in OE

    EasyOS on the Pi4 does not have samba, as compile failed in OE. Yes, I could compile it in a running EasyOS on the Pi4, but would rather fix it in OE.

    I have a 'samba_%.bbappend' file, the main objective being to remove the 'pam' and 'krb5' dependencies. I worked on this recipe this morning. The problem is that instead of 'krb5', the internal 'heimdahl' is used, and this compiles two binaries, that are then executed during compile.

    The problem is that the binaries are compiled for the target system, in this case aarch64, whereas the build system is x86_64, so the binaries cannot run.
    OE does have a mechanism to handle this. It is possible to compile 'samba-native', that is, samba compiled to run on the build-system, and then use the two binaries from that when compile 'samba'.

    Fine, except that exactly how to do this is very poorly documented. The official documentation is very vague. A couple of years ago, I bought a book, "Embedded Linux Systems with the Yocto Project", but found that it also said hardly anything about this. I consider this to be an important topic, yet it seems that many OE experts don't know much about it either.

  •     

  • Arduino Blog » Turn your staircase into a flaircase with this LED system

    If you live in a house with stairs and have to traipse up and down at night, it’s best to have some sort of light that guides you. Although a cell phone can work just fine, or you could likely activate bright overhead lighting, creator MagicManu devised an automatic and progressive solution to illuminate his path instead.

    MagicManu’s system knows when someone is there using PIR sensors arranged at both ends, and only activates if it’s dark enough thanks to a photoresistor. The entire setup is controlled by an Arduino Nano, while two potentiometers adjust light sensitivity and duration of ignition.

Raspberry Pi HAT offer NMEA 2000 link for marine applications

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Copperhill’s $99 “PiCAN-M” HAT for the Raspberry Pi provides CAN-based NMEA 2000 and RS-422 driven NMEA 0183 ports for marine applications. The HAT includes a 3A SMPS supply and a Qwiic link.

In 2019, Copperhill Technologies launched a PiCAN3 CAN-Bus HAT for the Raspberry Pi 4. The new PiCAN-M (for Marine), built for Copperhill by SK Pang, offers a marine-specific, NMEA 2000 compatible version of CAN. The $98.50 HAT also supplies an RS-422-based NMEA 0183 interface plus a Qwiic interface for adding SparkFun’s Qwiic add-ons.

Read more

System76 Brings Back the Darter Pro Linux Laptop with Longer Battery Life, Tiger Lake CPUs

Filed under
Hardware

The Darter Pro is one of System76's most versatile all-around Linux laptops and the 2021 refresh is here with 11th Gen Intel Core i5-1135G7 and i7-1165G7 CPUs with 4 cores / 8 threads and integrated Iris Xe graphics, up to 64GB dual-channel DDR4 3200MHz RAM, and up to 4TB M.2 SSD storage.

Best of all, the new Darter Pro comes with System76’s Coreboot-based Open Firmware and Open Source Embedded Controller Firmware to give customers full control over the hardware, and also make the Linux laptop faster and more secure.

Read more

Raspberry Pi Foundation Release Their Own Silicon, the Raspberry Pi Pico

Filed under
Hardware

It was about time for the Raspberry Pi Foundation to release their own silicon, so here it is guys! Meet Raspberry Pi Pico, the result of several years of hard work designed to offer Raspberry Pi owners and anyone else who like building their own hardware high performance for integer workloads, flexible I/O, and low cost.

Raspberry Pi Pico is built on the RP2040 microcontroller chip, which features a dual-core ARM Cortex-M0+ processor running at 133MHz, 264KB of on-chip RAM, support for up to 16MB of off-chip flash memory via a dedicated QSPI bus, DMA controller, as well as interpolator and integer divider peripherals.

Read more

TUXEDO InfinityBook S 15 Linux Laptop Launches with Tiger Lake CPUs, Ultra Thin Design

Filed under
Hardware

Meet TUXEDO InfinityBook S 15, the smallest 15.6-inch Linux laptop offering from TUXEDO Computers that does not disappoint on any aspect. Its biggest attraction is the ultra thin design with 92 percent screen-to-body ratio and very compact design that can only be found on 14-inch laptops.

The ultra modern and thin design is due to the 15.6-inch Full HD (1920×1080 pixels) IPS display featuring approximately 300 nits brightness, 800:1 contrast, 95% sRGB color gamut, and anti-reflective / non-glare coating, as well as the monocolor (white) backlit keyboard with TUX super-key, and a clickpad with multi-touch gestures.

Read more

Open Hardware: Arduino and Little Bee

Filed under
Hardware
  • Arduino Blog » Homemade machine puts a new spin on winding yarn

    If you’ve ever wanted to wind balls of yarn, then look no further than this automated machine from Mr Innovative. The YouTuber’s DIY device is powered by an Arduino Nano and an A4988 stepper driver, spinning up a round conglomeration of yarn via a NEMA17 motor and a timing belt.

    The ball is wound on an offset spindle, which is mechanically controlled to pitch back and forth and spin itself as the overall assembly rotates, producing an interesting geometric pattern.

  • Little Bee is an affordable, open hardware current & magnetic field probe (Crowdfunding)

    Little Bee is an affordable, open-source hardware, and high-performance current probe and magnetic field probe designed to debug and analyze electronic devices at a much lower cost than existing solutions such as Migsic CP2100B or I-prober 520. This type of tool is especially important for power electronics, which has become ever more important with electric vehicles, alternative energy solutions, and high-efficiency power supplies.

  • Arduino Blog » James Bruton demonstrates the Coanda effect with an Arduino-controlled rig

    The Coanda effect, as you may or may not know, is what causes flowing air to follow a convex surface. In his latest video, James Bruton shows how the concept can used as a sort of inverted ping pong ball waterfall or staircase.

    His 3D-printed rig pushes balls up from one fan stage to another, employing curved ducts to guide the lightweight orbs on their journey.

    The fan speeds are regulated with an Arduino Uno and motor driver, and the Arduino also dictates how fast a feeder mechanism inputs balls via a second driver module. While the setup doesn’t work every time, it’s still an interesting demonstration of this natural phenomenon, and could likely be perfected with a bit more tinkering.

Devices/Embedded/SBC Hardware With GNU/Linux on Top

Filed under
Hardware

  • Fanless embedded PC supports industrial GRE Tiger Lake CPUs

    Avalue’s fanless, rugged “EMS-TGL” embedded PC runs Linux or Win 10 on embedded versions of Intel’s 11th Gen ULP3 Core CPUs with up to 64GB DDR4-3200, 3x M.2, 1GbE and 2.5GbE ports, and optional “IET” expansion.

    Avalue, which recently launched a pair of NUC-APL mini-PCs based on Intel’s Apollo Lake, announced a larger, but similarly fanless embedded computer with Intel’s 10nm, 11th Gen “Tiger Lake” ULP3 processors. The rugged EMS-TGL runs Linux and Win 10 and supports applications including digital signage, smart retail, and computer vision.

  •   

  • If LG stops making smartphones, who will push the boundaries with weird devices like the LG Wing and LG Rollable? - Liliputing

    Meanwhile, folks who are still interested in weird phones might have to look to smaller companies like F(x)Tec, Planet Computers, Pine64, and Purism, which have developed phones with features like built-in keyboards, support for GNU/Linux distributions and other free and open source operating systems, and physical kill switches for wireless, mic, and camera functions, among other things.

  • MicroMod modular ecosystem offers M.2 microcontrollers cards and carrier boards

    MicroMod is a modular interface ecosystem for quick embedded development and prototyping. MicroMod comes with two components, that is a microcontroller “processor board” and a carrier board. PC industry’s M.2 connector is the interface between these two components. The carrier boards are for the usage of various peripherals and the processor board act as the brain of the application system. 

  •   

  • Odroid Go Goes Super - Boiling Steam

    Odroid continues to move beyond the simple realm of Single Board Computers (SBCs) to become and more and more credible player as a portable consoles manufacturer. After introducing the Odroid Go and the Odroid Go Advance (that both cow_killer and I reviewed), they have announced at the end of December 2020 that they were going to release yet another version, the Odroid Go Super.

  •   

  • Use Raspberry PI as FM Radio transmitter - peppe8o

    As usual, I suggest adding from now to your favourite ecommerce shopping chart all needed hardware, so that at the end you will be able to evaluate overall costs and decide if continuing with the project or removing them from shopping chart. So, hardware will be only:

    - Raspberry PI Zero W (including proper power supply or using a smartphone micro usb charger with at least 3A) or newer Raspberry PI Board

Devices: Watchy, Raspberry Pi, and Linksys

Filed under
Hardware

Open Hardware: Arduino, EasyOS for the Pi. and More

Filed under
Hardware
  • Arduino Blog » This Arduino-based speed bag counts your punches

    Creator DuctTapeMechanic loves sports and electronics, so for a recent project he decided to combine his two passions by hacking a speed bag to keep track of his punches.

    As shown in the video below, the first step was to get it physically set up, modding an old metal bed frame into a support structure. He also added a recessed NPN capacitive sensor to pick up when the bag hits the back of the platform.

    The sensor sends “hit” signals to an Arduino Uno via a PC817 optocoupler. The board then counts punches and displays the number of hits on an LCD screen mounted just above eye level.

  • Arduino MKR inspired MKR Windy board is equipped with STM32WL LoRa SoC

    We recently wrote about MKR SharkyPro BLE, Zigbee, OpenThread development board based on STM32WB55 MCU and following Arduino MKR form factor, but it turns out Midatronics has also launched a similar-looking board with LoRa connectivity.

    MKR Windy board features the company’s Windy STM32WL module with an uFL connector and following the same Arduino MKR layout.

  • EasyOS Dunfell 2.6 released for the Raspberry Pi4

    EasyOS, compiled for an aarch64 (64-bit ARM) CPU, with 5.10.4 Linux kernel, compiled entirely from source in a port of the Dunfell release of OpenEmbedded, is available for the Raspberry Pi4. Version number is 2.6, but this is the first release for the Pi.
    EasyOS for the Pi4 might be a bit beta-quality in places, but overall quite a nice experience. The "beta bits" I will of course keep working on -- as there is an "update" icon on the desktop, it will be easy-peasy to update.
    Write the image to a good-quality and fast microSD-card (Class 10) or USB-stick (example: SanDisk Ultra), at least 8GB so that you have plenty of space for anything in the future. Though, a minimum of 2GB will work. As to the host board, even a Pi3B with 1GB RAM will work, or rather "just work" -- I recommend at least a Pi4 with 2GB RAM -- I have the 8GB RAM board.

  • Managing Edge IoT Linux Devices Closely, Remotely, Securely

    With the recent shift from Real-Time Operating Systems (RTOS) to Linux-based embedded systems, there has been a boom in the IoT industry in creativity and expandability and opened doors to a whole new level of automation.

    Unlike the previous generation of IoT devices which followed the “program once, use forever” concept, with the new developments in the IoT industry, mainly the devices based on Linux operating systems that demand more and more flexibility, accessibility, and control. It has been challenging to address all these points at once when it comes to remote monitoring and control of these devices; especially if one produces thousands of those smart devices to be sold worldwide.

    The ability to manage these connected devices (Raspberry Pi, Jetson Nano, or any SOM/SBC that runs a flavor of Linux such as Yocto based, Ubuntu or Debian, etc.) through a single platform, be it just one device, a dozen, or maybe a couple thousand would prove to be immensely productive when considering both the time and cost it’d otherwise take to manage them individually.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

KDE: Kate and Konsole

     
  • The Kate Text Editor - January 2021

    It not only got some nice visual refresh but a much better fuzzy matching algorithm. The fuzzy matching algorithm is on its way to be upstream to KCoreAddons to be used by more parts of the KDE universe. Praise to Waqar Ahmed for implementing this and pushing it to upstream. And thanks to Forrest Smith for allowing us to use his matching algorithm under LGPLv2+! [...] As you can see on our team page a lot of new people helped out in the scope of the last year. I hope to see more people showing up there as new contributors. It is a pleasure that Waqar Ahmed & Jan Paul Batrina now have full KDE developer accounts! Especially Waqar came up with a lot of nifty ideas what could be fixed/improved/added and he did already do a lot of work to actually get these things done! I actually wanted to write earlier about what cool new stuff is there, but had too much review requests to look after. Great! ;=) No I can read review request instead of light novels in the evening.

  •  
  • Contributing to Konsole

    I never thought I could contribute with Open Source, or even imagined I could change my workspace, in my mind doing it was beyond my programming skills. I was a Windows user for a long time, until one day I couldn’t stand anymore how the system was so slow, it was not a top computer, but it was a reasonable one to be that slow. So I changed to Debian and used it for a time until change to other distros, but I was amazed how fast it was, of course I couldn’t use all of the same programs I used to work with but I did learn new ones.

GNU: GNU Binutils 2.36, GCC 11, and GTK 4.0

  • GNU Binutils 2.36 Released With Support For Intel AMX, AVX VNNI, Key Locker - Phoronix

    GNU Binutils 2.36 is out today as the latest version of this collection of binary utilities for Linux/open-source systems. As usual the x86_64 space for today's Binutils update is fairly eventful around supporting new CPU instructions. There is now support for AVX VNNI, HRESET, UINTR, TDX, AMX and Intel Key Locker instructions. All these additions are fairly notable for new and upcoming CPUs, especially the likes of the Advanced Matrix Extensions (AMX) and AVX (non-AVX-512) VNNI. Intel's open-source developers continue doing a good job on ensuring timely support for new CPU features in the Linux space.

  • gcc 11: libgccjit is no longer 'alpha'
  • GCC's JIT Library Is No Longer Considered "Alpha" Quality - Phoronix

    With the upcoming GCC 11 compiler release the GNU compiler's just-in-time (JIT) library is no longer considered to be of alpha quality. Libgccjit is considered production quality with GCC 11. GCC 5 was released nearly six years ago already and with that release came the introduction of this GCC JIT library initially developed by Red Hat's compiler experts. It was initially written as an embed-friendly library, to be used by bytecode interpreters and other potential use-cases with there even having been an experimental Python compiler.

  • GTK4 Toolkit Seeing More Improvements To Its OpenGL Renderer - Phoronix

    While GTK 4.0 has been released, there still is major work to look forward to with future GTK4 releases. One area seeing recent and ongoing improvements is with the toolkit's OpenGL renderer. Even though GTK4 has a Vulkan renderer, the OpenGL renderer is still of interest for cross-platform support particularly for macOS where Vulkan doesn't exist unless employing MoltenVK. There is also still legacy and other cases like the Nouveau driver stack where Vulkan isn't available, thus in 2021 working on the OpenGL renderer still pays off.

openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2021/03

Dear Tumbleweed users and hackers, Shame on me for giving you the information about the changes in Tumbleweed during this week only now, but at least technically this is still the review of Week 03. Since the last weekly review, there have been 6 snapshots published (0114, 0115, 0118, 0119, 0120, and 0121). Read more

Intel Has A New Driver For Linux 5.12: Reporting Your Laptop's Hinge/Keyboard Angle

Intel's latest open-source Linux driver contribution is a hinge driver that is set to debut with Linux 5.12. The "hid-sensor-custom-intel-hinge" driver is for supporting a hinge sensor found in many modern Intel laptops. This sensor is able to calculate the angle of the laptop's hinge, the screen angle, and the keyboard angle relative to the horizon/ground. I hadn't realized this sensor was all that common these days but apparently so and enough interest to Intel that they have now provided a Linux driver for exposing this hinge / keyboard / screen angle data. Read more Also: Learn To Get Involved In Linux Kernel Development This Spring