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Krita 4.4.1 Released

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KDE
Software

Despite an extra-long beta period during which we got awesome feedback from our community, 4.4.0 was released with several regressions, that is, bugs that weren’t present in 4.3.0. So today we’re releasing Krita 4.4.1 with the following fixes...

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Chemtool: Open-source Chemical Structure drawing program

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Software
Sci/Tech

Chemtool is a lightweight application for drawing chemical structures like organic molecules. It's originally written by Thomas Volk from Germany. Later on, more developers came to aid for development and code maintenance.

[...]

The program is created for Linux X systems, it does not work on Windows or macOS.

License

Chemtool is released under GNU General Public License.

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GStreamer 1.18.1 stable bug fix release

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Software

The GStreamer team is pleased to announce the first bug fix release in the stable 1.18 release series of your favourite cross-platform multimedia framework!

This release contains important security fixes. We suggest you upgrade at your earliest convenience.

This release only contains bugfixes and it should be safe to update from 1.18.0.

See the GStreamer 1.18.1 release notes for more details.

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Exploring Vim: The 18 Best Vim Books To Improve Your Vim Fu

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Software

Vim is only content or text editing tool. That is it. In case you’re accustomed to utilizing Sublime Text for Windows/Mac, Notepad for Windows, Nano for Linux, Atom for Windows/Mac, or any content tool, Vim is simply one more program that permits you to compose and alter the text. Contrasted with other word processors, 2 viewpoints make Vim stick out are proficiency and universality. Vim is all about productivity. What’s more, there are two or three points from which it approaches productivity. Vim permits you to be proficient by driving you to utilize the console, and indeed, that implies no more using the mouse! Therefore, a perfect set of Vim books is undecipherably crucial to learn Vim.

Universality is likewise a pretty cool part of Vim, which is that it’s all over. It’s accessible on essentially every significant stage you can consider. Regardless of whether you’re utilizing a Mac, Windows, or some Linux conveyance, Vim has you secured. Specifically, if your everyday work includes working in the terminal meetings, Vim is your lone content manager accessible.

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Also: Zeit - A GUI Front-end To Crontab To Schedule Jobs In Linux - OSTechNix

Joplin and webdav

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Software

Joplin is a cross-platform note taking app that I use a lot to keep track of my projects, and to organize my notes and thoughts. Joplin allows you to create note books, and add an infinite number of notes to them. You can link between notes, link to external sources, add images, tables, etc. Everythin in markdown, very easy to learn and use. It’s basically an Evernote clone, without the subscription, and without one other thing that I’ll talk about later.

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Kodi 18.9 Released with HTTP Access Workaround [PPA]

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Software
Movies

Kodi media center released one more update for the 18.x “Leia” a day ago, with a quick workaround to the third-party HTTP2 and SSL changes that impacted internet access from Kodi by scrapers, streaming addons, etc.

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9 Best Free and Open Source Linux Archive Managers

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Software

A file archiver is computer software which brings together a group of files into a single archive file. An archive file is therefore a collection of files and directories that are stored in one file. There are many advantages of storing multiple files this way. For example, an archive is a great way to store backup data, transfer files to another directory, or to a different computer. Archive files are often compressed to save disk space and reduce transfer times.

This type of utility lets users compress, decompress, and archive files and directories. Most archivers also store additional metadata such as user and group permissions, timestamps, and directory structures. Other features often found in archive managers include support for multiple volumes, encryption, Unicode names, password protection, and integration into the shell.

The granddaddy of archive managers is the tar utility (together with the ar and cpio tools). Tar was created in the early days of Unix and remains an essential utility for any Linux system. The filename extension .tar is synonymous with file archives. Other types of archive formats include .iso (for optical storage mediums such as CDROM and DVD-ROMs), .shar, .cpio, and .ar.

Linux has a good range of open source archive managers, both console based (such as tar) or sporting an attractive graphical user interface and integrating with a desktop environment.

Here’s our recommendations. Hopefully there will be something of interest for anyone who wants to backup their data, create new archives, and decompress files downloaded from the internet.

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Wine 5.20 Released

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Software

The Wine development release 5.20 is now available.

What's new in this release (see below for details):
  - More work on the DSS cryptographic provider.
  - A number of fixes for windowless RichEdit.
  - Support for FLS callbacks.
  - Window resizing in the new console host.
  - Various bug fixes.

The source is available from the following locations:

  https://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.20.tar.xz
  http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.20.tar.xz

Binary packages for various distributions will be available from:

  https://www.winehq.org/download

You will find documentation on https://www.winehq.org/documentation

You can also get the current source directly from the git
repository. Check https://www.winehq.org/git for details.

Wine is available thanks to the work of many people. See the file
AUTHORS in the distribution for the complete list.

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Also: Wine 5.20 Released With Various Improvements For Running Windows Software On Linux

Is Albert going to be your loyal app assistant?

Filed under
Software

A light comic book repartee, right there, ha ha. So. Let's say you have a Linux desktop. What's the one thing missing? Apart from all the other things missing? Well, it's an integrated application launcher. Now, what I just said is incorrect. Because if you're using the Plasma desktop environment, you have Krunner, and you're all set like. Unity also has some elements of this goodness available.

If you're using other desktop environments, then there's isn't such functionality in the operating system really. And so Dedo reviews Ulauncher. Dedo gets emails. Emails say Dedo wrong. Dedo should review Albert. Dedo ponders and decides to blaze forth. After all, nailing down the formula for an omnipotent and actually useful desktop assistant is very hard. Often, it's a fad, a gimmick, an extra, but never something you embrace with heart and loin. Maychance Albert will convince us otherwise. To the cave.

[...]

Going into this experiment, I have to say I didn't expect to be mindblown. Because I know how difficult it is to create a really useful helper software. Even the mega-giants out there, with their multi-billion-dollar budgets can't do it right. But even if we keep our goal modest, Linux desktop wise, Krunner remains well ahead of the game, both in functionality and system integration.

Albert is okay. It works reasonably well, and it's no slouch. But the magic is getting the advanced functionality right. The basics are too trivial - and too overdone to matter. Also, I find the lack of a simple extensions management option tiring. I don't want to go about the net, manually downloading Python scripts and such. I don't have the time or the mental strength to commit to something like that, especially since the benefits aren't that big. The, there were also actual bugs and issues - like the hotkey binding, Firefox bookmarks and no built-in translation. For now, Albert is worth testing and playing with, but I don't see it becoming an indispensable household software any time soon.

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Linux Candy: Hollywood – fill your console with Hollywood melodrama technobabble

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Software

Linux Candy is a series of articles covering interesting eye candy software. We only feature open source software in this series.

Some of the programs in this series are purely cosmetic, frivolous pieces of fun. Candy at their finest. But we also include some programs that aren’t purely decorative.

There’s a diverse range of programs included in this series. Programs such as eDEX-UI and Variety are actually highly practical programs. ASCIIQuarium has soothing and relaxing qualities for your desktop. Other programs included in this series (such as lolcat, cacafire) are included purely for their decorative qualities. And then there’s some really fun software that just raises a smile or two.

Hollywood is a 102 line script that occupies your console with tech geekery.

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