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Wine 5.0 Released

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Software
Gaming

  • Wine 5.0 Released

    The Wine team is proud to announce that the stable release Wine 5.0 is now available.

    This release represents a year of development effort and over 7,400 individual changes. It contains a large number of improvements that are listed in the release notes below. The main highlights are:

    - Builtin modules in PE format.
    - Multi-monitor support.
    - XAudio2 reimplementation.
    - Vulkan 1.1 support.

    This release is dedicated to the memory of Józef Kucia, who passed away in August 2019 at the young age of 30. Józef was a major contributor to Wine's Direct3D implementation, and the lead developer of the vkd3d project. His skills and his kindness are sorely missed by all of us.

  • Wine release 5.0
    What's new in Wine 5.0
    ======================
    
    
    *** PE modules
    
    - Most modules are built in PE format (Portable Executable, the
      Windows binary format) instead of ELF when the MinGW compiler is
      available. This helps various copy protection schemes that check
      that the on-disk and in-memory contents of system modules are
      identical.
    
    - The actual PE binaries are copied into the Wine prefix instead of
      the fake DLL files. This makes the prefix look more like a real
      Windows installation, at the cost of some extra disk space.
    
    - Modules that have been converted to PE can use standard wide-char C
      functions, as well as wide-char character constants like L"abc".
      This makes the code easier to read.
    
    - Not all modules have been converted to PE yet; this is an ongoing
      process that will continue during the Wine 5.x development series.
    
    - The Wine C runtime is updated to support linking to MinGW-compiled
      binaries; it is used by default instead of the MinGW runtime when
      building DLLs.
    
    
    *** Graphics
    
    - Multiple display adapters and monitors are properly supported,
      including dynamic configuration changes.
    
    - The Vulkan driver supports up to version 1.1.126 of the Vulkan spec.
    
    - The WindowsCodecs library is able to convert more bitmap formats,
      including palette-indexed formats.
    
    
    *** Direct3D
    
    - Fullscreen Direct3D applications inhibit the screensaver.
    
    - DXGI swapchain presents inform the application when the
      corresponding window is minimized. This typically allows
      applications to reduce CPU usage while minimized, and is in some
      cases required to allow the application window to be restored again.
    
    - Switching between fullscreen and windowed modes using the standard
      Alt+Enter combination is implemented for DXGI applications.
    
    - The following features are implemented for Direct3D 12 applications:
      - Switching between fullscreen and windowed.
      - Changing display modes.
      - Scaled presents.
      - Swap intervals.
      These features were previously already implemented for earlier
      versions of the Direct3D API.
    
    - The handling of various edge cases is improved. Among others:
      - Out of range reference values for the alpha and stencil tests.
      - Sampling 2D resources with 3D samplers and vice versa.
      - Drawing with mapped textures and buffers.
      - Usage of invalid DirectDraw clipper objects.
      - Creating Direct3D devices on invalid Windows, like the desktop
        window.
      - Viewports with a minimum Z larger than or equal to the maximum Z.
      - Resources bound through both shader-resource views and
        render-target or depth-stencil views at the same time.
      - Blits between formats with and without alpha components.
      Since well-behaved applications don't rely on these edge cases, they
      typically only affect one or two applications each. There are
      nevertheless quite a number of them.
    
    - Dirty texture regions are tracked more accurately for Direct3D 8 and 9
      texture uploads.
    
    - Uploads of S3TC-compressed 3D textures require less address space.
      Since 3D textures can be potentially large, and address space
      exhaustion is a concern for 32-bit applications, S3TC-compressed 3D
      textures are uploaded per-slice, instead of in a single upload.
    
    - The ID3D11Multithread interface is implemented.
    
    - Various lighting calculation fixes and improvements for older
      DirectDraw applications have been made.
    
    - Limited support for blits across swapchains is implemented.
    
    - More shader reflection APIs are implemented.
    
    - The wined3d CPU blitter can handle compressed source resources.
      Support for compressed destination resources was already implemented
      in a previous release.
    
  • Wine 5.0 Released With Big Improvements For Gaming, Countless Application Fixes

    Wine 5.0 has been released as stable as the annual timed release of this software for running Windows games and applications on Linux, macOS, and other platforms.

    Wine 5.0 is another big step forward in allowing modern Windows applications to run well particularly on Linux and macOS. Thanks to CodeWeavers and funding by Valve for their work on the Wine-based Proton downstream, there are many game fixes that have been incorporated over the past year especially. So Windows games are in better shape plus there is Vulkan 1.1 support, FAudio integration, and countless other improvements.

  • The bottle for Wine 5.0 has officially been popped open as it's out now

    The day has arrived, the official stable release of Wine 5.0 has arrived bringing thousands of improvements and a bunch of new features.

    [...]

    Wine 5.0 as a release is also being dedicated to the memory of Józef Kucia, a major contributor to Wine's Direct3D implementation and he lead developer of the vkd3d project who sadly passed away in August 2019.

bandwhich Shows What's Taking Up Your Network Bandwidth On Linux And macOS

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Software

This tool's main purpose is to shows what is taking up your bandwidth. It was originally called "what", but its name was changed to bandwhich about 3 weeks ago.

bandwhich is able to show the current network utilization by process, connection and remote IP/hostname by sniffing a given network interface and recording the IP packet size, cross-referencing it with the /proc filesystem on Linux and lsof on macOS. Also, the tool attempts to resolve the IP addresses to their host names in the background, using reverse DNS "on a best effort basis"; this can be disabled using the -n / --no-resolve option.

By default, bandwhich runs in interactive mode and it has 3 panes that show: network utilization by process name, utilization by connection, and utilization by remote address. Because bandwhich has a responsive terminal user interface, the terminal window in which you run bandwhich must be large enough for these 3 panes to be displayed - depending on the window width and/or height, only one or two of these panes may be shown.

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Need a distraction-free art application on Linux? Try out MyPaint

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Software

If you have a Wacom-style graphic tablet and you need a simple and distraction-free painting program, MyPaint seems like it could be a really good fit.

The developer, Martin Renold, says it's a "fast and dead-simple painting app for artists" and I can certainly appreciate the ease of use to it. Very handy for doing any kind of art really. Perhaps if you're in the mood for some sketching, mockups or you're designing art for a game it's pretty sweet.

A big new version is currently in testing, with a Beta that was released back in December. This brings with it great AppImage support to run it (hopefully) out of the box on any modern Linux distribution, along with tons of new features for artists like Spectral Paint/Pigment layer and brush mode, Linear blending for non-pigment layers and brush modes, Smudge enhancements, Fullscreen improvements, "fake inputs" for pressure and barrel rotation (allowing on-the-fly expressive adjustments to your brush even while using a mouse) and loads more.

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Syncthing: Open Source P2P File Syncing Tool

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Software
Gadgets

Syncthing is an open-source peer-to-peer file synchronization tool that you can use for syncing files between multiple devices (including an Android phone).

Usually, we have a cloud sync solution like MEGA or Dropbox to have a backup of our files on the cloud while making it easier to share it.

But, what do you do if you want to sync your files across multiple devices without storing them on the cloud?

That is where Syncthing comes to the rescue.

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Comparison: Snap vs Flatpack vs AppImage

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Software

New packaging formats like Snap, Flatpak and AppImage are providing distribution agnostic packages that work on most Linux distributions. This solves packaging problems faced by app developers who want to distribute their apps on multiple Linux distributions. Now they can focus on one build that works everywhere instead of going through different packaging standards.
This article will list the main differences between these three packaging formats from end users’ perspective. Differences in packaging architecture and ease of packaging from developers’ point of view won’t be covered here.

The table below summarizes the main differences between Snap, Flatpak and AppImage file formats. Most of them are self-explanatory, other points have been explained below the comparison table.

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Evernote’s Official Linux Client is Coming Soon

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

If you are an Evernote fan, you probably have been missing it on Linux desktop. There is the web version available but you cannot use it offline if you are not a premium user.

Linux (almost) always has a way around. So, there are some third party applications that let you use Evernote on Linux. There are also some alternative applications to Evernote available on Linux.

A native Linux client for Evernote has been requested for a long time and the good news is that it should finally be coming to Linux in the year 2020.

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OpenShot - If you have to ... shot, shot, don't talk

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Software
Movies

As you probably know, my go-to video editor is Kdenlive, which I've used many times before, to great success, creating dozens of unfunny clips, all of them available on my Youtube channel. But then, I've recently had less luck with the program, having tested both 2018's beta and last year's 19.08 stable edition, and neither really impressed me.

I came across bugs and crashes, and overall, it felt like the application has taken a nosedive. While older versions ought to keep working fine for quite a while longer, I wouldn't like to be in a position where my artistic spread of majestic wings is curtailed for any reasons. Hence, alternatives, hence testing. And thus, I came across an old-new title, OpenShot, a free, cross-platform video editor. Funnily, I've seen it many times before, but never really used in properly. This article shall remedy that.

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LXMusic – music player designed for the minimalist

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Software

The music scene is where I’m happiest in life. As an amateur musician, I spend a lot of time improving my technique, practicing, practicing, and practicing. I also love listening to professional musicians. Linux is my other passion. Linux is endowed with bountiful globs of open source multimedia software. I love testing out new multimedia software early in its development, or introduce myself to popular software that’s mature and laden with tons of features. The choice is bamboozling.

I’ve covered the vast majority of free and open source music players for Linux, but there’s always more to look at. This week, I’ve been exploring LXMusic. It’s a minimalist music player for LXDE, a lightweight desktop environment. The project aims to be the default music player of LXDE, but it runs on any desktop environment.

LXMusic is written in the C programming language, and uses GTK+, a highly usable, feature rich toolkit for creating graphical user interfaces. LXMusic is based on xmms2, using xmms2d, a daemon through which XMMS2 clients playback and manage music.

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Intel's OSPray 2.0 Ray-Tracing Engine Released

Filed under
Hardware
Software

An area where Intel continues striking with rhythm and near perfection is on the open-source software front with their countless speedy and useful open-source innovations that often go unmatched as well as timely hardware support. Out this weekend is their OSPray 2.0 release for this damn impressive ray-tracing engine.

OSPray 2.0 is out as their latest big upgrade to this open-source ray-tracing engine that supports photo-realistic global illumination, MPI for exploiting large system performance, volume rendering, and is all open-source software. OSPray 2.0 is another big advancement for this project that is part of Intel's growing oneAPI tool-kit.

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Proprietary Software and Openwashing

Filed under
Software
Security
  • Boeing discovers new software problem in 737 Max

    The news comes following the release of internal documents showing employees knew about problems with pilot training for the 737 MAX and tried to conceal them from regulators. In the documents released by US lawmakers, Boeing employees said the aircraft was "designed by clowns, who in turn are supervised by monkeys," in an apparent reference to regulators.

  • A Georgia election server was vulnerable to Shellshock and may have been hacked

    Forensic evidence shows signs that a Georgia election server may have been hacked ahead of the 2016 and 2018 elections by someone who exploited Shellshock, a critical flaw that gives attackers full control over vulnerable systems, a computer security expert said in a court filing on Thursday.

    Shellshock came to light in September 2014 and was immediately identified as one of the most severe vulnerabilities to be disclosed in years. The reasons: it (a) was easy to exploit, (Cool gave attackers the ability to remotely run commands and code of their choice, and (c) opened most Linux and Unix systems to attack. As a result, the flaw received widespread news coverage for months.

  • Micro Focus AD Bridge 2.0: Extending security policies and access controls to cloud-based Linux

    With AD Bridge 2.0, organizations can leverage existing infrastructure authentication, security as well as policy, in order to simplify the migration of on-premises Linux Active Directory to the cloud, resulting in fully secured and managed Linux virtual machines in the cloud.

  • [Attacker] stole [sic] over 10,000 hospital files

    Jason Corden-Bowen, of the CPS, said: “Moonie had no right to access confidential patient and staff records. He admitted his earlier wrongdoing and accepted a police caution yet he went ahead to reoffend knowing fully well it was not just against hospital procedures but it was wrong and illegal.

  • Facebook Releases Open Source Speech Recognition Platform

    Facebook has announced that it will be making its wav2letter@anywhere online speech recognition framework more readily available as an open source platform. The framework was developed by Facebook AI Research (FAIR), which claims that it has created the fastest open source automatic speech recognition (ASR) platform currently on the market.

  • Microsoft opens up Rust-inspired Project Verona programming language on GitHub
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