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Software

Software: Audacity, Geary, GNOME Photos, Business Apps, Mir, Nix, KubeVirt, Top Projects and Apoxi

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Software
  • Audacity 2.2.2 Released with a Stack of New Features & Improvements

    This update also builds upon the major changes introduced in the release of Audacity 2.2.0 last year, as well that of the minor 2.2.1 update earlier this year.

  • Geary Email Client Mails Out a Bug Fix Update

    A new version of the Geary email client for Linux desktops is available to download.

    Although a (relative) minor update when compared to the huge Geary 0.12 release last year, Geary 0.12.1 is worthwhile.

    The update solves a stack of crashes and server compatibility issues, while also updating translations in the interface and user manual to ensure as many people can use Geary as possible.

  • GNOME Photos – An Elegant Alternative for Organizing and Sharing Photos

    How many GNU/Linux photo managers do you know have a beautiful UI for browsing photos and organizing them into collections coupled with inbuilt editing tools and cloud integration? This one goes by the name of GNOME Photos.

    GNOME Photos is a simple and yet elegant photo management app with which you can organize, share, and intuitively edit your photos on your Linux workstation. It features a file manager-like environment for easy navigation and cloud integration via GNOME Online Accounts.

  • Linux Means Business – Best Free Business Apps

    Let’s deal with the issue of cost up front. Every single application featured in this article is available to download without payment. This, in itself, helps to keep IT costs within a tight budget. And cost can be a very important driver when seeking an IT solution for firms – particularly for freelancers, entrepreneurs, start-ups, small businesses, and educational establishments. Naturally, these types of people and organizations will have some sort of IT budget. From a business perspective, open source business applications won’t necessarily be zero cost. Using unfamiliar software entails training costs for a firm — the costs are not limited to time itself. And then there’s the expense of obtaining support for the software, or even hiring development time to customize certain aspects of the software to add additional functionality. Off-the-shelf software is unlikely to completely address a company’s needs. But if a proprietary solution is sought, it’s likely that this development will be more expensive.

    It is sometimes thought that Linux software cannot rival Microsoft applications in a commercial setting because the strength of Linux comes from its price. In fact, Linux’s strength derives from other considerations such as flexibility, stability, security, cutting-edge technology, and ease of use. Additionally, the virtues of open source software are invaluable to commercial organizations whatever their size. With full access to source code, companies can easily develop extensions to the software, tailor made to their own specific needs and requirements. Moreover they are not reliant on the goodwill of a single vendor in order to do business: Linux is about freedom and choice and that is just as important to an organisation as to an individual.

  • Mir's Wayland Support Will Now Let You Drag Around Windows

    I was surprised to learn that up until this week, Mir's initial Wayland support didn't allow for windows of Wayland clients to be moved around the screen.

    Fortunately, that has now been resolved with allowing window movement to be initiated by Wayland clients running on Mir. Now you can enjoy Qt, GTK apps, and even the Weston Terminal to be moved around the screen. Previously there was just server-side support for moving windows in Wayland while now is client-side support.

  • Nix 2.0 Package Manager Released With A Ton Of Changes

    Nix 2.0 is now available as the latest major update to this functional package manager most commonly associated with the NixOS Linux distribution.

  • KubeVirt v0.3.0-alpha.3: Kubernetes native networking and storage

    First post for quite some time. A side effect of being busy to get streamline our KubeVirt user experience.

    KubeVirt v0.3.0 was not released at the beginnig of the month.

    That release was intended to be a little bigger, because it included a large architecture change (to the good). The change itself was amazingly friendly and went in without much problems - even if it took some time.

    But, the work which was building upon this patch in the storage and network areas was delayed and didn’t make it in time. Thus we skipped the release in order to let storage and network catch up.

  • Top 5 open source projects for 2018

    In our increasingly collaborative world, open source technology is a top trend that is having a major impact on the development and implementation of cutting edge capabilities. Open source is when source code connected to a program is made freely available, giving users the opportunity to make modifications and to share with other users.

    The common alternative to this is proprietary software, source code that remains under the strict control of an organisation, team or individual, ensuring that the integral code remains private and controlled by its owner.

  • DataTorrent Glues Open Source Componentry with ‘Apoxi’

    Building an enterprise-grade big data application with open source components is not easy. Anybody who has worked with Apache Hadoop ecosystem technology can tell you that. But the folks at DataTorrent say they’ve found a way to accelerate the delivery of secure and scalable big data applications with Apoxi, a new framework they created to stitch together major open source components like Hadoop, Spark, and Kafka, in an extensible and pluggable fashion.

Software: funny-manpages, Nginx, Cockpit and More

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Software
  • Have a Laugh With Funny Linux Man Pages

    There is a package unsurprisingly called funny-manpages and it adds some witty entries to the man pages.

  • HTTP/2 Server Push Directives Land in Nginx 1.13.9

    The open source Nginx 1.13.9 web server debuted today, providing support for a new HTTP/2 standard feature known as Server Push.

    The HTTP/2 web standard was completed three years ago in February 2015, with Nginx ahead of the curve in terms of HTTP/2 standard adoption. The NGINX Plus R7 release in September 2015 featured the first commercially supported enterprise-grade support provided by Nginx for HTTP/2.

  • Cockpit 162

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 162.

  • 6 Best Linux Music Players That Every User Must Try — (2018 Edition)

    Watching movies and playing music is one of the primary entertainment purposes served by our computers. So, when you move to a new operating system, it makes perfect sense if you look for useful media players. In the past, we’ve already told you about the best video players for Linux and, in this article, we’ll be telling you about the best music players for Linux-based operating systems. Let’s take a look at them:

  • CPod (formerly Cumulonimbus) – A Beautiful Podcast App

    Today, we introduce a somewhat new podcast application that is simple and yet delivers efficiently across all 3 desktop platforms.

    CPod, (formerly known as Cumulonimbus), is an electron-based podcast app player for audiobook and podcast lovers.

  • Apper 1.0.0 is out!

    Apper the package/apps manager based on PackageKit has got it’s 1.0.0 version on it’s 10th birthday!

  • VidCutter – Quickly Trim and Join Video Clips

    VidCutter is an open-source cross-platform video editor with which you can quickly trim and join video clips. It is Python and Qt5-based, uses FFmpeg for its encoding and decoding operations, and it supports all the popular video formats not excluding FLV, MP4, AVI, and MOV.

    VidCutter boasts a customizable User Interface that you can personalize using themes and a plethora of settings that you can tweak to make your video editing environment more appealing.

  • Weblate 2.19.1
  • Tusk Evernote Client Updated, Is Now Available as a Snap

    The Tusk Evernote client is now available as a Snap.

    We spotlighted the unofficial Evernote app last year, finding that it added to and improved on the standard Evernote web app in a number of ways.

Software and Games Leftovers

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Software
Gaming
  • LXD Weekly Status #35

    This past week we’ve been focusing on a number of open pull requests, getting closer to merging improvements to our storage volume handling, unix char/block devices handling and the massive clustering branch that’s been cooking for a while.

    We’re hoping to see most of those land at some point this coming week.

    On the LXC side of things, the focus was on bugfixes and cleanups as well as preparing for the removal of the python3 and lua bindings from the main repository. We’re also making good progress on distrobuilder and hope to start moving some of our images to using it as the build tool very soon.

  • Performance Co-Pilot 4.0.0 released

    It gives me great pleasure to announce the first major-numbered PCP release in nine and a half years - PCP v4 - is here!

  • Performance Co-Pilot Sees First Major Version Bump In Nearly A Decade

    The Performance Co-Pilot open-source cross-platform monitoring/visualizing stack has reached version 4.0 as its first major version hike in almost ten years.

  •  

  • Sci-fi mystery 'The Station' has released, it’s a short but memorable experience

    What would happen if we discovered the existence of alien life? A question I've often asked and a question many games, films and books have covered in great detail. The Station [Steam] is a sci-fi mystery that sees you investigate The Espial, a space station sent to research a sentient alien civilization.

  • Halcyon 6: The Precursor Legacy DLC released, some good content for a small price

    Halcyon 6: The Precursor Legacy DLC [GOG, Steam] was released earlier this month, adding some really nice content at a small price to an already great game.

  • Parry and dodge your way to victory in 'Way of the Passive Fist', launching March 6th

    Way of the Passive Fist [Steam, Official Site] is a rather unique and very colourful arcade brawler and it's releasing with Linux support on March 6th.

Software: GIMP, Spyder, SMPlayer

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Software
  • Five free photo and video editing tools that could save burning a hole in your pocket and take your creativity to the next level

    GIMP stands for the Gnu Image Manipulation Program and is the first word that people usually think about when it comes to free image editors. It’s a raster graphics editor, available on multiple platforms on PC. It has a similar interface to Photoshop: you have your tools on one side, there’s an option for your tool window and then you have your layers window on another side. Perhaps one of the most useful features of GIMP is the option of plugins. There is a wide database for them and there’s a plugin for almost any task you might need to carry out.

    GIMP is extremely extensive, and it’s the choice of the FOSS community, thanks to the fact that it’s also open source. However, there are also some disadvantages. For example, GIMP has no direct RAW support yet (you have to install a plugin to enable it, which means a split workflow). It also has quite a bit of a learning curve as compared to Photoshop or Lightroom.

  • Introducing Spyder, the Scientific PYthon Development EnviRonment

    If you want to use Anaconda for science projects, one of the first things to consider is the spyder package, which is included in the basic Anaconda installation. Spyder is short for Scientific PYthon Development EnviRonment. Think of it as an IDE for scientific programming within Python.

  • SMPlayer 18.2.2 Released, Install In Ubuntu/Linux Mint Via PPA

    SMPlayer is a free media player created for Linux and Windows, it was released under GNU General Public License. Unlike other players it doesn't require you to install codecs to play something because it carries its own all required codecs with itself. This is the first release which now support MPV and some other features such as MPRIS v2 Support, new theme, 3D stereo filter and more. It uses the award-winning MPlayer as playback engine which is capable of playing almost all known video and audio formats (avi, mkv, wmv, mp4, mpeg... see list).

Future of Wine Staging

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Software
  • Future of Wine Staging

    Some of you may have already wondered why there were no Wine Staging releases lately and whether anything has changed. There are indeed some major changes, which we want to explain in this post. Before doing so, let us take a quick look at the history of this project.

    Wine Staging originated from Pipelight, a software to use Windows browser plugins in Linux/FreeBSD web browsers. In order to support Silverlight and its DRM system PlayReady, we had to create our own Wine version as the development code did not support storing Access Control Lists (ACLs) for files. It turned out that getting the support into the development version was quite difficult and Erich E. Hoover tried this since 2012. We figured out that there must be more patches that are considered as too experimental for the development branch and started with Wine Staging in 2014. While the project got larger and larger in roughly 120 releases, the maintenance effort also increased, especially since we follow the 2 week release cycle of the development branch.

  • Wine Staging is no longer putting out new releases

    There have been many people asking questions about the future of Wine Staging, turns out it's no longer going to have any new releases.

    I won't quote the entire post titled "Future of Wine Staging", but the gist of it is that they just don't have the spare time to put into it now. They have full time jobs, so naturally that doesn't leave much for something like this. I fully understand their situation and wish them all the best, I've seen so many people appreciate the work they did to bring so many different patches together for testing.

    The good news, is that there's already a fork available. On top of that, Wine developer Alexandre Julliard posted on the Wine mailing list about keeping it going in some form, so there might be light at the end of the tunnel.

  • Wine-Staging Will No Longer Be Putting Out New Releases

    Wine-Staging as many of you have known it for the past four years is unfortunately no more. We'll see if other reliable folks step up to maintain this experimental version of Wine but the original developers have sadly stepped away.

Software and Games

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Software
Gaming

Wine 3.2 is Out

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Software

Min: An Open Source Web Browser for Minimalists

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Software

Min is an open source web browser with a clean UI and minimalist look. Despite being minimal, Min packs enough features for a standard web browsing experience.
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Atom 1.24

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Software
  • Atom 1.24

    Atom 1.24 has been released on our stable channel and includes read-only TextEditors, asynchronous context menus, and automatic scrolling on folding and unfolding.

  • Atom Hackable Text Editor Gets Asynchronous Context Menus, Read-Only TextEditors

    GitHub updated today its open-source and cross-platform Atom hackable text editor app to add asynchronous context menus, read-only TextEditors, and automatic scrolling on unfolding and folding.

    Atom 1.24 is now available for Linux, Windows, and macOS, bringing asynchronous context menus to no longer lock up the even loop on right-click and allow other rendering and processing operations to occur when the context menu is displayed, a new LanguageMode API, automatic scrolling when folding or unfolding, and read-only TextEditors.

    "Packages can apply a read-only attribute to TextEditors to disable input," says Ash Wilson in the release notes. "This is useful when you wish to display code with syntax highlighting and allow copying to the clipboard, but it doesn’t make sense for the user to be able to change it, for example because it’s code in your git history or it isn’t on your local drive."

Top 6 Partition Managers (CLI + GUI) for Linux

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Software

Are you looking to tweak or manage your disks partitions in Linux? In this article, we will review some of the best tools that help Linux users partition and manage their disks. We will see both command line utilities as well as GUI applications for managing disk partitions in Linux.

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Also: Min: An Open Source Web Browser for Minimalists

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