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Software

Software: FreeFileSync, Debian/GSOC, LibreOffice and Lightworks

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Software
  • File Synchronization App FreeFileSync Brings Another Update

    File synchronization software, FreeFileSync releases latest update with 10.13.

    FreeFileSync is a folder and file synchronization free software that is available for Linux, Windows and Mac. This software can sync between your devices files and folders and only sync the changed files/directories. That means it can identify the changed files and make sure to transfer those in backup systems.

    Armed with scheduling of transfers, JOB features for sync – this free and open source software is one of the best file sync/ backup software available today.

    FreeFileSync released 10.13 with bunch of big fixes and enhancements.

  • Utkarsh Gupta: GSoC Bi-Weekly Report - Week 1 and 2

    The idea is to package all the dependencies of Loomio and get Loomio easily installable on the Debian machines.

    The phase 1, that is, the first 4 weeks, were planned to package the Ruby and the Node dependencies. When I started off, I hit an obstacle. Little did we know about how to go about packaging complex applications like that.

    I have been helping out in packages like gitlab, diaspora, et al. And towards the end of the last week, we learned that loomio needs to be done like diaspora.

  • Annual Report 2018: LibreOffice Conference

    The LibreOffice Conference is the annual gathering of the community, our end-users, and everyone interested in free office software. Every year, it takes place in a different country and is supported by members of the LibreOffice commercial ecosystem. In 2018, the conference was organized by the young and dynamic Albanian community at Oficina in Tirana, from Wednesday, September 26, to Friday, September 28, the eight anniversary of the LibreOffice project. Here’s a quick video recap – read on for more details…

  • New Lightworks Beta Version 14.6 revision 114986 Now Available on Windows Linux and Mac!

    It is strongly recommended that users backup their project folder before installing any new Beta build of Lightworks.

    We are pleased to announce the second Beta of Lightworks 14.6 which includes many changes based on Forum feedback. Excellent work all round and we are hopeful that this Beta Cycle will be short lived. We hope you enjoy all the features and changes in the latest version which can be found in the : Changelog pages

  • Lightworks 14.6 Remains A Closed-Up Blob, But At Least The Linux Support Continues

    It was nearly a decade ago the high-end, commercial video software editing solution Lightworks announced they would be going open-source but to this day that milestone has yet to be materialized. Lightworks though does continue advancing with their v14.6 release on the horizon and at least their added Linux support continues to be expanded upon.

    EditShare, the company behind Lightworks, really dropped the ball when it came to their open-source plans. All that we've been able to gather over these years is that they hit some complexities with their original open-source plans and aren't committed enough in seeking to work through those issues to make the code public. So at the end of the day Lightworks is still a closed-source non-linear video editor, but at least it's one of the most feature-rich/professional-grade solutions with native Linux support.

Curseradio – curses interface for browsing and playing internet radio

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Software

My roadmap is to review all actively maintained internet radio players. To date, I’ve covered odio, Shortwave, Radiotray-NG, PyRadio, and StreamTuner2. Only PyRadio is console based software.

It’s only right and proper that I turn to another console based internet radio streamer. Like PyRadio, Curseradio offers a curses interface for browsing and playing an OPML directory of internet radio streams. It’s also written in the Python programming language.

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Software: libhandy, OpenNebula, Cockpit and LibreOffice

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Software
  • Adrien Plazas: libhandy 0.0.10

    libhandy 0.0.10 just got released, and it comes with a few new adaptive widgets for your GTK app.

  • FOSS Project Spotlight: OpenNebula

    With the current conversation shifting away from centralized cloud infrastructure and refocusing toward bringing the computing power closer to the users in a concerted effort to reduce latency, OpenNebula's 5.8 "Edge" release is a direct response to the evolving computing and infrastructure needs, and it offers fresh capabilities to extend one's cloud functionality to the edge. Gaming companies, among others, who have been using OpenNebula were of the first to push for these features (yet they don't have the be the only ones to benefit from them).

  • Cockpit 196

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 196.

  • bibisect-linux-64-6.4 is available with KDE5 support!

    The LibreOffice Quality Assurance ( QA ) Team is happy to announce the bisect repository from libreoffice-6-3-branch-point to latest master is available for cloning from Gerrit. As a novelty, this repository adds support for KDE5 environment.

Exo 0.12.6 Released

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Software

With Xfce 4.14 rapidly approaching, development efforts have shifted to bug fixes. Exo 0.12.6 is no exception, with several old and new bugs finally meeting their end.

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Software: ledger2beancount, Commerce, scrcpy, Oracle Linux Virtualization Manager

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Software
  • ledger2beancount 1.8 released

    I released version 1.8 of ledger2beancount, a ledger to beancount converter.

    I ran ledger2beancount over the ledger test suite and made it much more robust. If ledger2beancount 1.8 can't parse your ledger file properly, I'd like to know about it.

  • 15 Best Open Source Solutions for Your E-commerce Business

    One of the many advantages the Internet age has given us is the ability to launch and manage businesses online using a virtually unending list of resources that are free, paid, open source, and proprietary.

    [...]

    PrestaShop is a freemium e-commerce solution that enables users to launch and manage their online business with several tools that enable them to attract visitors, customize their store, conveniently manage products, sell globally, see traffic analytics, etc.

  • scrcpy 1.9 Released (View And Control Your Android From A Linux, Windows Or macOS Desktop)

    scrcpy, an application to display and control your Android device from a desktop, be it Linux, Windows or macOS, was updated to version 1.9. The new release includes bidirectional copy-paste, new option to turn the Android screen off while mirroring, and more.

    scrcpy is a free and open source tool to display and control Android devices via USB or wirelessly. It focuses on lightness, performance and quality, offering high resolution, high FPS, and low latency. You can read more about it on this article.

    scrcpy 1.9 includes a new option to have the phone screen off, only showing the screen on the computer (while mirroring). Focus the scrcpy window and press Ctrl + o to turn the device screen off while mirroring, and POWER or Ctrl + p to turn it back on. You can also run scrcpy with -S / --turn-screen-off to turn the device screen off on start.

  • Announcing Oracle Linux Virtualization Manager

    Oracle is pleased to announce the general availability of Oracle Linux Virtualization Manager. This new server virtualization management platform can be easily deployed to configure, monitor, and manage an Oracle Linux Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) environment with enterprise-grade performance and support from Oracle.

  • KVM/oVirt-Powered Oracle Linux Virtualization Manager Reaches GA

    While Oracle backs the VM VirtualBox virtualization software, they increasingly are offering new solutions around KVM virtualization. Hitting general availability (GA) status this week is the Oracle Linux Virtualization Manager. 

Luminance HDR: An Open Source Software for LDR/HDR Imaging in Ubuntu

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Software

Luminance HDR is an open source application based on Qt5 toolkit for LDR/HDR image processing. It’s a complete workflow for high-quality imaging including HDR and LDR formats. Luminance HDR offers a simple to use and intuitive graphical user interface. It’s a cross-platform application which supports Windows OS, Mac OS, and Linux system.

As I mentioned above that this software supports a wide range of HDR and LDR formats out of the box. Worth mentioning HDR formats are radiance RGBE, tiff formats, openEXR, PFS native format, raw image formats, etc. JPEG, PNG, PPM, PBM, TIFF, FITS all those are mentionable LDR formats, it does supports.

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Deluge BitTorrent Client 2.0

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Software
Web
  • Deluge BitTorrent Client 2.0 Released With Sequential Downloads, Now Uses Python3 And Gtk3

    Deluge BitTorrent client has reached version 2.0 stable recently, after more than 2 years since the previous stable release. The new stable Deluge version comes with major changes, including code ported to Python 3, Gtk UI ported to Gtk 2, sequential downloads support, a new logo, and much more.

    Deluge is a free and open source BitTorrent client that runs on Linux, Windows, macOS and *BSD. It's written in Python, and it includes a text console, a web interface, and a graphical desktop interface that uses Gtk.

  • Deluge 2.0.0 Major version is Released after continuous development of 2 Years and 5 Months

    The Deluge development team is proudly announced the new major version release of Deluge 2.0.0 on 06 June, 2019.

    In the following days (Deluge 2.0.1 on 07 June, 2019 & Deluge 2.0.2 on 08 June, 2019), they had been released the minor version of Deluge in the same branch to fix some of the issue, which have reported by users.

  • Welcome to the Deluge BitTorrent Project

    Latest Deluge release 2.0.2 available for Linux, Mac OS X and Windows.

Open Source Music Creation Tool ‘LMMS’ Scores Its First Update in 4 Years

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Software

Once pitched as a free Fruityloops (now FL Studio) clone, LMMS has matured into a brilliant beat maker (okay, digital audio workstation) in its own right.

The app boasts an easy-to-use interface, lots of tools, and plenty of advanced features, including support for VST instruments.

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10 Best Open Source Accounting Software for Linux

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Software

An Accounting Software is an complex application that enables businesses of any size to manage data especially financial data and ensure that all resources end up in the right place.

Any such software that is good has the ability to gather, analyze, summarize, and report financial data and some even go an extra mile to automate certain tasks, implement contingency strategies, and allow for custom functions.

Here is a list of the best accounting software for Linux platforms that are not only open source but also free or low-cost.

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Stacer: An All in One System Optimizer and App Monitoring Tool for Linux

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GNU
Linux
Software

Most probably, you have heard the name of CCleaner for Windows system which comes handy when a user needs to monitor system processes or resources. Actually, system optimizer application is quite familiar in Windows or mobile platform including Android or iOS. But for Linux system, sometimes, pro users prefer to use command line tools for optimizing or monitoring the system. Then what’s about the beginners like me who want to control or monitor the system using a simple and intuitive user interface? For them, Stacer plays a vital role which comes with a handful of features to better optimize the Linux system.

It’s one of the best CCleaner alternatives for the Linux system. Stacer, Linux Task Manager, is packed with advantages like real-time system processes and resource monitor, start-up software control, the ability to clear the system cache, ability to remove software, and control to start or stop any processes or services.

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Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: Calendar management dialog, archiving task lists, Every Detail Matters on Settings (Sprint 2)
    This was a long-time request, and something that I myself was missing when using To Do. Since it fits well with the product vision of the app, there was nothing preventing it from being implemented. Selecting this feature to be implemented during the week was a great choice – the task was self contained, had a clear end, and was just difficult just enough to be challenging but not more than that. However, I found a few issues with the implementation, and want to use the next round to polish the feature. Using the entire week to polish the feature might be too much, but it will give me some time to really make it great.
  • Open Source Answer To Dropbox And OneDrive: Meet Frank Karlitschek
    During the OpenSUSE Conference in Nurnberg (German), Nextcloud founder Frank Karlitschek appeared on “Let’s Talk’ to talk about the importance of fully open source file sync and storage solutions for enterprise customers. As one of the early contributors to desktop Linux he also talked about the reasons why desktop Linux has not succeeded.
  • Load-Bearing Internet People
    Some maintainers for critical software operate from a niche at a university or a government agency that supports their effort. There might be a few who are independently wealthy.
  • Robert Helmer: Vectiv and the Browser Monoculture
    So, so tired of the "hot take" that having a single browser engine implementation is good, and there is no value to having multiple implementations of a standard. I have a little story to tell about this. In the late 90s, I worked for a company called Vectiv. There isn't much info on the web (the name has been used by other companies in the meantime), this old press release is one of the few I can find. Vectiv was a web-based service for commercial real estate departments doing site selection. This was pretty revolutionary at the time, as the state-of-the-art for most of these was to buy a bunch of paper maps and put them up on the walls, using push-pins to keep track of current and possible store locations. The story of Vectiv is interesting on its own, but the relevant bit to this story is that it was written for and tested exclusively in IE 5.5 for Windows, as was the style at the time. The once-dominant Netscape browser had plummeted to negligible market share, and was struggling to rewrite Netscape 6 to be based on the open-source Mozilla Suite.

OSS Leftovers

  • Letter of Recommendation: Bug Fixes
    I wouldn’t expect a nonprogrammer to understand the above, but you can intuit some of what’s going on: that we don’t need ImageMagick to scale images anymore, because the text editor can scale images on its own; that it’s bad form to spell-check hex values, which specify colors; that the bell is doing something peculiar if someone holds down the alt key; and so forth. But there’s also something larger, more gladdening, about reading bug fixes. My text editor, Emacs, is a free software project with a history going back more than 40 years; the codebase itself starts in the 1980s, and as I write this there are 136,586 different commits that get you from then to now. More than 600 contributors have worked on it. I find those numbers magical: A huge, complex system that edits all kinds of files started from nothing and then, with nearly 140,000 documented human actions, arrived at its current state. It has leaders but no owner, and it will move along the path in which people take it. It’s the ship of Theseus in code form. I’ve probably used Emacs every day for more than two decades. It has changed me, too. It will outlive me. Open source is a movement, and even the charitably inclined would call it an extreme brofest. So there’s drama. People fight it out in comments, over everything from semicolons to codes of conduct. But in the end, the software works or it doesn’t. Politics, our personal health, our careers or lives in general — these do not provide a narrative of unalloyed progress. But software, dammit, can and does. It’s a pleasure to watch the code change and improve, and it’s also fascinating to see big companies, paid programmers and volunteers learning to work together (the Defense Department is way into open source) to make those changes and improvements. I read the change logs, and I think: Humans can do things.
  • The Top 17 Free and Open Source Network Monitoring Tools
    Choosing the right network monitoring solution for your enterprise is not easy.
  • Hedge-fund managers are overwhelmed by data, and they're turning to an unlikely source: random people on the internet
    Alternative data streams of satellite images and cellphone-location data are where managers are now digging for alpha, as new datasets are created every day. And hedge funds have been spending serious cash searching for those who can take all this information and quickly find the important pieces. Now, as margins shrink and returns are under the microscope, hedge funds are beginning to consider a cheaper, potentially more efficient way to crunch all this data: open-source platforms, where hundreds of thousands of people ranging from finance professionals to students, scientists, and developers worldwide scour datasets — and don't get paid unless they find something that a fund finds useful.
  • TD Ameritrade Is Taking Its First Steps Towards Major Open Source Contributions
    STUMPY is a python library to identify the patterns and anomalies in time series data. STUMPY has benefited from open source as a means to shorten development roadmaps since the early 2000s and it represents a new opportunity for TD Ameritrade to give back to the developer community.
  • The Future of Open Source Big Data Platforms
    Three well-funded startups – Cloudera Inc., Hortonworks Inc., and MapR Technologies Inc. — emerged a decade ago to commercialize products and services in the open-source ecosystem around Hadoop, a popular software framework for processing huge amounts of data. The hype peaked in early 2014 when Cloudera raised a massive $900 million funding round, valuing it at $4.1 billion.
  • No Easy Way Forward For Commercial Open Source Software Vendors
    While still a student in 1995, Kimball developed the first version of GNU Image Manipulation Program (GIMP) as a class project, along with Peter Mattis. Later on as a Google engineer, he worked on a new version of the Google File System, and the Google Servlet Engine. In 2012, Kimball, Mattis, and Brian McGinnis launched the company Viewfinder, later selling it to Square.
  • 6 Reasons Why Developers Should Contribute More To Open Source
    Even by fixing minor things like a bug in a library or writing a piece of documentation can also help the developers to write readable or maintainable code. They can independently suggest to the community and generally tend to stick by the rules of writing a code that is easy to understand. The fact that the code will be exposed to everyone naturally makes them write focus on making it readable.
  • WIDE Project, KDDI develop router with open-source software, 3.2T-packet transmission
    The WIDE Project has adopted a router developed by Japanese operator KDDI. The router runs open-source software, and will be used with the networks operated and managed by the WIDE Project. The router will use open-source software with up to 3.2T-packet transmission. For this project, KDDI plans to start tests this month to verify the practical utility and interoperability of these routers when put to use in the actual service environment. The WIDE Project will be in charge of network administration and definition of requirements for router implementation.
  • Lack of progress in open source adoption hindering global custody’s digitisation
    Custody industry is lagging behind the rest of the financial services sector for open source projects, according to industry experts.
  • TNF: Industry should be focusing on open source development
    According to O'Shea, open source and the community are helping firms to find and attract experienced technology talent “uber engineers”.
  • Google Open Sources TensorNetwork , A Library For Faster ML And Physics Tasks
    “Every evolving intelligence will eventually encounter certain very special ideas – e.g., about arithmetic, causal reasoning and economics–because these particular ideas are very much simpler than other ideas with similar uses,” said the AI maverick Marvin Minsky four decades ago. Mathematics as a tool to interpret nature’s most confounding problems from molecular biology to quantum mechanics has so far been successful. Though there aren’t any complete answers to these problems, the techniques within domain help throw some light on the obscure corners of reality.
  • Open source to become a ‘best practice’
    There are many magic rings in this world… and none of them should be used lightly. This is true. It is also true that organisations in every vertical are now having to work hard and find automation streams that they can digitise (on the road to *yawn* digital transformation, obviously) and start to apply AI and machine learning to. Another key truth lies in the amount of codified best practices that organisations now have the opportunity to lay down. One we can denote a particular set of workflows in a particular department (or team, or group, or any other collective) to be deemed to be as efficient as possible, then we can lay that process down as a best practice.
  • 10 Open-Source and Free CAD Software You Can Download Right Now
    Many CAD software products exist today for anyone interested in 2D or 3D designing. From browser tools to open-source programs, the market is full of free options available for hobbyists or small companies just starting out.

How to Send Emails From Linux Terminal

A brief introduction to SSMTP, steps to install it and use the same to send emails from Linux terminal. Read more