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Software

Best Messaging and Communications Apps for Ubuntu

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Software

The popularity of Linux has been able to replace Windows at many workplaces, and the same scenario was also reported for personal users. Hence many popular apps from various platforms such as Android and Windows are being integrated into Linux and its distros.
Business emails/chats are also being replaced by instant messaging and communication apps as they provide more options to share files, photos, and videos, making the whole process easier. It would be great to use messaging apps on the Linux desktop that we use on our mobile devices. According to your mood, apps like these give you the flexibility to use the messaging app wherever you want.

This pandemic also taught us the importance of messaging and communication apps because these apps made it possible for many businesses to run smoothly in the time of crisis. So, in this article, we’re going to have a look at the best messaging and communication apps for Ubuntu.

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Best Free And Open Source Photoshop Alternatives

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Photoshop is quite synonymous with Graphics design nowadays, but it is not the only king in the room. Photoshop doesn’t come with a friendly interface for beginners. No doubt photoshop offers you freedom of using features quite independently, but everything comes at a cost.
There are some other options too that are worth considering for users who are looking for open source and free photoshop alternatives. These free and open source photoshop alternatives are not only useful for beginners but also useful for professionals who are thinking of switching from photoshop. And the good thing is that these free applications make no compromise with the quality of work.

So, what to do if you are a bit tight on budget and want to learn to design without paying the monthly subscription as in Photoshop. Well, I have prepared a list of free and open-source applications like photoshop to create awesome designs without compromising quality.

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RSS Guard Is A Qt Desktop RSS Feed Reader With Support For Syncing With Feedly, Google Reader API, More

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RSS Guard is a free and open source Qt RSS feed reader for Microsoft Windows, Linux and macOS. The application can synchronize with services like Tiny Tiny RSS, Inoreader, Nextcloud News, and with the latest 3.9.0 version released today, Feedly and services supporting the Google Reader API (The Old Reader, Bazqux, Reedah, FreshRSS, etc.).

The application supports RSS / RDF / ATOM / JSON feed formats, as well as podcasts using RSS / ATOM / JSON. Besides syncing with the online services mentioned above via plugins, RSS Guard can also add feeds locally, with support for importing and exporting feeds to/from OPML 2.0.

The user interface is highly customizable, allowing users to hide various elements, add or remove buttons to/from the toolbar, and even use a vertical or horizontal layout (with the latter being great for ultrawide screens). A full screen mode is also included.

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NoiseTorch Is A Real-Time Microphone Noise Suppression Application For Linux

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NoiseTorch is a real-time microphone noise suppression application for Linux that can filter out unwanted background noise like the sound of your mechanical keyboard, computer fans, trains and so on. It currently only supports PulseAudio, but PipeWire support is planned for a future release.

The application user interface is built with simplicity in mind. If you only have 1 microphone, all you have to do is launch the application, then click on "Load NoiseTorch". Once you do this, the application creates a virtual microphone called "NoiseTorch Microphone"...

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The 10 best free photo editors for Linux

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Software

Photo editing is a global hobby, profession, and exploit. Its execution is not dependant on a specific Operating System or device. For this reason, anyone can be a photo editor regardless of their Operating system preference. The power of an ideal and reliable photo editor is in the many unique features they present to their users. Some features pose unique photo editing benefits like correcting brightness imbalances and color hue. Some editors are efficient in sharpness adjustments and red-eye removal. Others present flexible auto-cropping and zoom features. These are some of the characteristics that define a photo editor.

The earlier onset of the Linux operating system was without the support of photo editors. This trait forced most Linux users to depend on graphically-oriented Operating Systems like the Windows OS to meet their photo editing needs. Fast forward into the present, Linux OS is turning out to be a worthwhile opponent and an even better rival to other Operating Systems due to the graphical traits presented in its growing distributions and flavors.

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Telegram Desktop 2.6 Released with Disappearing Messages in Chats, Groups, and Channels

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Unlike Signal and WhatsApp, Telegram didn’t offer a dedicated disappearing messages mode, until now. Telegram Desktop 2.6 lets you set messages to auto-delete for everyone 24 hours or 7 days after they’ve been sent, and the best thing is that the feature works on any chat, as well as in groups and channels where you’re an admin.

To use the new disappearing messages feature in chats or groups, you’ll have to right click on the respective chat in the chat list where you want to enable auto-delete, go to Clear History, and then click on Enable Auto-Delete. Only in chats, you can also enable auto-delete by clicking on Clear History on the right side pane.

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Software: Plasma Mobile, Appnativefy. dav1d, and GNU Taler on Digital Currencies

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GNU
Software
  • Plasma Mobile applications tarball releases

    Plasma Mobile team is happy to announce availability of tarballs for several of Plasma Mobile applications, they are available to download from download.kde.org

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  • Appnativefy – Turn Any Website into Single Executable Appimage

    Want to create web apps into the portable Appimage package format? Appnativefy is a simple tool to do the job.

    Appnativefy is a simple command line tool to make executable AppImage files from any website, it uses the Nativefier API in the backend, with AppImageKIt.

    Appimage is an universal Linux package format. Different to other packages, you don’t need to install it. Just make it executable and run to launch program!

  • dav1d 0.8.2 AV1 Decoder Showing Nice Uplift On Intel, AMD CPUs

    Released yesterday was dav1d 0.8.2 as a fairly significant update to this AV1 CPU-based decoder. For those wondering what this update means for performance, here are some initial benchmarks.

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  • 2021-2: "How to issue a Central Bank Digital Currency" published

    With the emergence of Bitcoin and recently proposed stablecoins from BigTechs, such asDiem (formerly Libra), central banks face a choice of either leaving the field to private actorsor offering their own digital alternative to physical cash. We do not address whether a centralbank should issue a central bank digital currency (CBDC). Instead, we demonstrate how acentral bank could do so, if desired or needed. We propose a token-based system withoutdistributed ledger technology and show how earlier-deployed, software-only electronic cashcan be improved upon to preserve transaction privacy, meet regulatory requirements in acompelling way, and offer a level of quantum-resistant protection against systemic privacyrisk. Neither monetary policy nor financial stability would be materially affected because ourCBDC would replicate physical cash rather than bank deposits.

Ardour 6.6 Open-Source DAW Makes Editing Automation Much Faster and Simpler

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Ardour 6.6 comes three months after Ardour 6.5 with two new features that make editing automation much faster and simpler than ever before. These include the ability to automatically display the automation-lane when touching a control and the ability for the auto-shown automation parameters to automatically enter touch mode when graphically adding a new control point.

This release also introduces the ability to keep track of xruns (overruns and underruns) per file when recording, support for processing MIDI sysex messages, such as MIDI Tuning Standard (MTS) messages, via the ACE Fluidsynth plugin, as well as new Lua scripts for sending arbitrary 12TET tuning (A = XXX Hz) and tuning defined in a Scala file as MTS messages.

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Software: Monitoring, Control Panels and Dav1d

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Software

     

  • Linux System Monitoring Fundamentals

    There are, of course, many higher-level system monitoring programs for all distributions that permit you to monitor any Linux server. These include Glance, a Python-based cross-platform system monitoring tool; htop, another cross-platform system monitor, which uses ncurses for its display; and Netdata, a distributed server system monitoring program. However, as useful as these can be, they all rely on lower-level programs.

    Four important Linux system monitoring tools are worthwhile to examine in more detail.

    Sar: System Activity Reporter (sar) is part of the Sysstat system resource utilities package. Sar is a do-it-all monitoring tool. It measures CPU activity; memory/paging; interrupts; device load; network; process and thread allocation; and swap space utilization. Sar can be used interactively, but its real value is that it keeps data logs over a long period of time, which you can use to troubleshoot recurring problems and produce reports. To learn more, read our How to Use the System Activity Reporter (sar) guide.

    Vmstat: This virtual memory statistics reporter is a built-in Linux command-line tool. In addition to reporting in detail on virtual memory usage, vmstat also gathers information on memory usage, memory paging, processes, I/O, CPU, and storage scheduling. Unlike sar, vmstat starts on boot. It’s used to report on cumulative activity since the last reboot. Our Use vmstat to Monitor System Performance guide includes more information about getting started with this monitoring tool.

    Monitorix: Monitorix is a free, open-source tool that monitors multiple Linux services and system resources. Monitorix, from version 3.0 on, comes with its own web server. This makes it useful for remote Linux system monitoring. Originally designed for the Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) operating system family, Monitorix now works on all major Linux server distributions. Read our How to use Monitorix for System Monitoring guide to learn more.

    Nethogs: This free and open-source program extends the net top tool that tracks bandwidth by process. For example, you might discern that the amount of outbound traffic has increased on your Linux server, but Nethogs helps you identify which process is generating the usage spikes. Other network monitoring utilities only break down the traffic by protocol or subnet. Read our Get Started Using Nethogs for Network Usage Monitoring guide to learn more about this tool.

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  • 6 Best free Cloud hosting Control Panels for Linux Servers in 2021

    VPS and Cloud hosting services come with full root access where users can select the Linux operating system of their (available with the services provider) choice. However, if you are planning to host some website then installing a web hosting control on your Linux server will not only makes everything easy but provides graphical user interface, so that management of files and application becomes quite easy.

    Furthermore, as a central point for the administration of the various user accounts and domains, web hosting control panels bring numerous advantages to the system administrator. Once set up, you will save a lot of time and effort in a future administration. Thanks to the simple graphical user interface of the administration program, settings can be easily made via the interface. Extensive expert knowledge and laborious work directly in the server’s operating system is no longer necessary.

    [...]

    Lately, I used open-source CloudPanel Cpanel on Amazon Cloud and I was really impressed because of its simple approach. Well, CloudPanel is not for those who are interesting in reselling hosting services instead meant for enterprises or individuals who want full control of their Cloud or VPS hosting server.

    For example, I want to create a WordPress-based website on Cloud or VPS server using Linux but handling everything using the command line is really a cumbersome task. Thus, in such a scenario CloudPanel’s easy-to-use web interface really works.

    Setting up a domain, database and installing PHP applications are super easy on it. Furthermore, out of the box it offers Nginx and multiple PHP versions to ensure fast speed and compatibility for a large range of web applications. To manage databases PhpMyAdmin is also there.

    The story doesn’t end here if we are using CloudPanel on a public cloud such as Amazon web services, Google Cloud, Digital Ocean, and Microsoft Azure; we can view Instances ID and other information directly on CloudPanel Dashboard including the option to manage security policies, firewall, backup, and other common functionalities.

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  • dav1d 0.8.2 Released For Speeding Up AV1 Decode On x86, ARM - Phoronix

    Dav1d is already the most performant and leading AV1 software decoder we have seen while out today is v0.8.2 that should speed-up the video decode process even more on modern x86/x86_64 and ARM hardware. 

    While dav1d 0.8.2 is "just a point release", it does pack some interesting performance optimizations for today's hardware. On the ARM front there are ARM32 optimizations to speed up loop restoration and for other operations. ARM64 has also rewritten the wiener functions, and improved IPRED and WARP, among other work. 

Dmitry Shachnev: ReText turns 10 years

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Software

Exactly ten years ago, in February 2011, the first commit in ReText git repository was made. It was just a single 364 lines Python file back then (now the project has more than 6000 lines of Python code).

Since 2011, the editor migrated from SourceForge to GitHub, gained a lot of new features, and — most importantly — now there is an active community around it, which includes both long-time contributors and newcomers who create their first issues or pull requests. I don’t always have enough time to reply to issues or implement new features myself, but the community members help me with this.

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