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Wine 6.0-rc1 Released

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  • Wine 6.0-rc1 Released

    The Wine development release 6.0-rc1 is now available.

    This is the first release candidate for the upcoming Wine 6.0. It marks the beginning of the yearly code freeze period. Please give this release a good testing to help us make 6.0 as good as possible.

  • Wine 6.0-RC1 Released Following Last Minute Changes - Phoronix

    As expected, the first release candidate of Wine 6.0 is now available for testing for this annual update to Wine for running Windows programs and games on Linux and other platforms.

    Wine 6.0-RC1 marks the start of the code/feature freeze ahead of Wine 6.0.0, which should be out in January. Until then the release candidates will continue.

  • The road to Wine 6.0 begins with a first Release Candidate | GamingOnLinux

    The Wine compatibility layer for running Windows applications on Linux and other systems has a new development release up, the first Release Candidate for Wine 6.0.

    Marking the beginning of a code freeze period, where the Wine team will now be focusing on stability rather than chucking in new features to make Wine 6.0 as good as it can be.

Software: DOSBox, Hypnotix, Pogo and Editors

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  • DOSBox Staging has a rather large new release out with 0.76.0 | GamingOnLinux

    DOSBox Staging is the fork of the original emulator with an aim to modernize it and give it some more advanced features, with the latest release out now.

    An important project because DOSBox itself is a vital bit of free and open source software, one that has enabled us not to lose out on thousands of classic games. Ensuring that it keeps working on modern systems using modern features with DOSBox Staging is awesome.

    This release is a big one covering many parts of it enhancing "the quality of audio emulation (GUS, built-in MIDI, PC speaker), improved support for PowerPC and POWER8 architectures, and a healthy mix of usability, documentation, code quality improvements". They go into a lot more detail in the lengthy release notes, which make for an interesting read.

  • Hypnotix – Watch Live TV via Linux Mint developed IPTV Player | UbuntuHandbook

    Want to watch live TV on Ubuntu Linux? Try Hypnotix, a new IPTV player developed by Linux Mint team.

    Hypnotix is a player application which streams from IPTV providers, which can be configured via a local M3U playlists, remote M3U URLs or the Xtream API.

    The player uses libmpv for video playback, and it’s configured to ship with Free-IPTV as default IPTV provider. You can easily remove it and set your own providers via software preferences dialog.

  • Pogo - minimalist music player - LinuxLinks

    My favorite pastime is to see an eclectic range of bands, solo artists, and orchestras live. It’s such a life-changing and exhilarating experience to be present. It’s one thing to be sitting at home listening to a CD or watching music videos on TV or on YouTube, but being with an audience, packed out in a stadium or music hall, takes it to another level. But it’s an expensive pastime, and still on hold given the current coronavirus pandemic. I’m therefore listening to music from my CD collection which I’ve encoded to FLAC, a lossless audio format, and stored locally.

    Linux offers a huge array of open source music players. And many of them are high quality. I’ve reviewed the vast majority for LinuxLinks, but I’m endeavoring to explore every free music player in case there’s an undiscovered gem.

    Pogo is billed as a fast and minimalist audio player for Linux. It’s written in Python and uses GTK+ and GStreamer, the latter is a pipeline-based multimedia framework that links together a wide variety of media processing systems to complete complex workflows.

    Pogo was forked from Decibel Audio Player, a defunct music player that saw its last release in September 2011.

  • Try this Linux text editor for Emacs fans

    The term "emacs" is actually a portmanteau of "Editor Macros," and the first one was programmed in 1976 as a set of macros for the TECO editor. GNU Emacs was developed as an interpretation of this style of visual text editor, and it was notably released as free, hackable, and redistributable software (called "free software" by the Free Software Foundation, although the term "free" in this context means "liberated" rather than "gratis").

    Other versions have been developed over the years, including Jove, an acronym for "Jonathan Payne's Own Version of Emacs." Jove is a small (it's only 250K) and minimalistic version of Emacs that can prove useful when you find GNU Emacs too bloated for what you need.

Pacman 6.0.0 Alpha

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LosslessCut – Super Fast Tool for Trimming / Cutting Video & Audio

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No patience with common video editors (e.g., Kdenlive and Openshot) as they can take hours to export a video after trimming / cutting it? Try LosslessCut.

LosslessCut is a cross platform tool for lossless trimming / cutting of video and audio files. The software is extremely fast, it does the job in seconds without losing quality because it simply cuts the data stream and directly copies it over.

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Software: Bolt, GMusicBrowser and Shortwave

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  • bolt 0.9.1 with fixes for integrated thunderbolt controller

    A new release of bolt is out: 0.9.1 - Unstable icy waters. This is a bug-fix release that addresses some issue on integrated Thunderbolt controller.

    Intel's Ice Lake is the first architecture where the Thunderbolt controller is part of the CPU die. This is quite a big difference. There is a good article on wikichip called "A Look At The Ice Lake Thunderbolt 3 Integration" for those that are curious about the technical details. What matters for bolt is that there is no DROM, which means that the udev device representing the host switch does not have the usual name and id attributes for the device and vendor. Additionally, the unique_id attribute has a different UUID every boot. This breaks one of the fundamental assumptions for boltd, which used the unique_id of the host to uniquely identify the corresponding Thunderbolt domain. This is important because we store host devices and domains in the store. Now, with the uuid changing this means that 1) we can not match the previously stored domains and hosts to the ones after a reboot and thus will accumulate "stale" domains in the store. Ironically, the fact that the host device also does not have any name and id information means that boltd would refuse to create the BoltDevice for those which meant we did at least not accumulate the stale host devices in the store. It did break the detection of the generation, i.e. if it is Thunderbolt 3 or USB 4.

  • GMusicBrowser Back From the Dead with GTK3 Port - OMG! Ubuntu!

    It’s been a long time since I last typed the name ‘Gmusicbrowser’ in a post but what d’ya know: the venerable music player recently issued a pair of new releases.

    Gmusicbrowser was a fairly popular audio app back in the day due to its customisable nature, and its ability to handle large (and I mean large) music collections. The open source app supports all major music files like .mp3, .ogg, and .flac — with the new release .opus joins the club.

    It’s possible to tweak, tune, and tailor the look of Gmusicbrowser in a giddying number of ways using its ‘layouts’ feature. You can craft these by hand, or use a built-in preset (e.g., ‘iTunes’, ‘Rhythmbox’, ‘Quod Libet’, etc).

  • Repo Review: Shortwave

    A few years ago, I had already reviewed quite a few of the internet radio players available in the repository, but I thought I'd take the time now to have a look at a new radio player available called Shortwave. Shortwave uses the very large, community driven radio-browser.info database for its lists of internet radio stations, giving you access to over 28,000 radio streams.

    Shortwave has a nicer and more modern user interface than a lot of the other internet radio players I've previously tested. The simplicity of Shortwave is good, making it quick and easy to find the radio stations that you're looking for. The main screen that you're presented with when opening Shortwave is the Library page. This is where you can keep all your favorite radio stations for easy access. Clicking on the + button at the top left of the window will take you to the Discover page, where you can find new radio stations to listen to.

    [...]

    Shortwave, in my opinion, is one of the best internet radio players that I've used. It may not have quite as many advanced features as some of the other radio players available, but it makes up for that with its great ease of use. And now would also be the perfect time to use Shortwave for listening to some of your favorite Christmas carols!

Sleek: A simple To-do app that makes use of todo.txt file format

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Todo.txt is a small yet a useful way to organize to-dos in one readable text file. It's popular among developers, software engineers, DevOps and nerdy Linux/ Unix users.

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Best Dual Pane File Managers for Linux

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This article will cover a list of free and open source dual-pane and multi-pane file managers available for Linux. These file managers provide a broader look at various files and folders stored on your storage devices. They also improve overall productivity and file handling experience, especially if you regularly navigate through a lot of files using keyboard shortcuts.

[...]

These are some of the most popular dual-pane and multi-pane file managers available for Linux. While these file managers may seem cluttered and a little verbose at times, they are really useful if you want to quickly navigate through multiple files at once and run simultaneous file operations.

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Most Popular and Essential Linux Applications for 2021

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One of the best things that come with Linux is its large collection of applications and tools. Linux has established a respectable name for itself and is well known for having some of the most excellent and stable applications, several of which are free and open source. 2020 has been another excellent year for the production and development of several amazing and outstanding applications, and the story is mostly going to be the same next year, as well. This article covers the top 10 applications that are expected to be extremely popular in 2021.

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OpenZFS 2.0 Released with ZStandard Compression, Persistent L2ARC, and More

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The biggest change is the rename of the project from ZFS on Linux to OpenZFS, which actually sounds really good and makes the project easily discovered by anyone who wants to an advanced file system and volume manager on their GNU/Linux or FreeBSD operating systems.

The second biggest change of the OpenZFS 2.0 release is the fact that Linux and FreeBSD platforms are now supported from the same repository, which means that both camps are now getting the same features at the same time. On GNU Linux, OpenZFS supports kernels from Linux 3.10 to Linux 5.9, while FreeBSD is supported from version 12 onwards.

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Camus Video Chat: The Open-source Privacy-aware Video Cat Meeting tool that you have been waiting for

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Camus is a lightweight cross-platform real-time peer-to-peer video chat application. It's built with Python3 and ready to be deployed on server with simple few steps.

We have reviewed and listed several open-source video applications on Medevel.com, but most of them require time and skills to install and use. It's not the case with Camu which is created by a solo developer using several technologies to make it a good alternative for Google Meet, meet.jit.si and of course zoom.

In glance, Camus offers similar functionalities to the competing apps like text messaging, customizable video quality, high audio quality and desktop sharing.

It's also can be installed easily on any Linux distribution that support Snap or on a web server with Docker.

The main reason why do like Camus is its easy install as it takes far more time to install and configure than most of the alternative apps we tested and used before.

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Also: Empathy first: Driving growth through people leadership

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