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Software

Free/Libre and Proprietary Software/Games

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Leftovers: Software and Games

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Software
Gaming
  • 10 Popular Apps To Use In 2017 If You Haven't

    We all run our favourite apps on your PC. This year you all will be wondering that which apps are updated? Which are the best app to use this year, so let’s take a look at the 10 new best apps for 2017.

  • Battery Monitor – Keep Track of Your Linux Battery Status

    Have you ever been engrossed in work so much so that you forget to check your system battery and it just sleeps on you? Well, all that is a thing of the past now since you know about the lightweight utility app to fix that.

    We introduce to you the Battery Monitor; is a tiny tool that will notify you about your system’s battery status which could be Charging, Discharging, Not Charging, Critically Low Battery on Linux.

  • Danbooru Client 0.6.1 released

    It offers a convenient, KF5 and Qt5-based GUI coupled with a QML image view to browse, view, and download images hosted in two of the most famous Danbooru boards (konachan.com and yande.re).

  • molly-guard – Protects Machines from Accidental Shutdowns/Reboots

    molly-guard is a handy utility which protects machines from accidental shutdowns/reboots by asking your hostname. Many of the Linux professional, working more then one system when they have issues. molly-guard was primarily designed to shield SSH connections.

    For some reason they want to reboot the system to resolve the issue in production, in such a case they might reboot wrong system instead of actual system. Even i also did the same accidentally many times.

  • Phoronix Test Suite 7.0 M5 Released

    The latest and last planned development release of Phoronix Test Suite 7.0-Ringsaker is now available for your cross-platform, open-source benchmarking needs.

  • Skype for Linux Beta Released with Video Call Support
  • Vimix GTK Theme is a colourful alternative to the Arc theme

    It’s no secret that the Arc GTK theme is our go-to recommendation for Linux users bored of their distro’s default design.

    This hasn’t gone unnoticed by our readers. William emailed us to say recommend a GTK theme that isn’t Arc — and it’s pretty nice!

  • Hurrah! SuperTuxKart Has Been Greenlit on Steam!

    Wave the checkered flag because SuperTuxKart has been greenlit on Steam thanks to thousands of votes from enthusiastic fans of the FOSS racing game.

  • Smartphone Game: Toon Sniper 3D is available in Tizen Store

    Toon Sniper is a game where you have to shoot, nothing else to it (almost.) You have to shoot the terrorists from the rooftop that you are standing on. The controls are simple. On the left bottom corner, you swipe left or right to look around and on the right bottom corner, you tap to shoot. There is also a magnifier icon above where you swipe to look around; this helps you to zoom in on the enemy and it helps your aim. You have a certain amount of people and the time you need to kill them in- on the first level you kill ten people in one minute fifteen seconds.

Wine 1.8.7

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Software
  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine maintenance release 1.8.7 is now available.
    This is the final release in the 1.8.x series.

  • Wine 1.8.7 Is the Last Update in the Series, Users Should Upgrade to Wine 2.0

    The Wine development team announced today the release of Wine 1.8.7, which appears to the last maintenance update to the Wine 1.8 stable series, adding various improvements and bug fixes for existing users.

    Before we dive ourselves into the changes implemented in Wine 1.8.7, you should be aware of the fact that if you're still using the Wine 1.8.x series of your GNU/Linux operating system, it is highly recommended that you prepare to upgrade to the new Wine 2.0 release (not Wine 2.1 or 2.2 because those are development releases).

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Linux Command Line Browser To Surf Internet

    Links is an open source text and graphical web browser with a pull-down menu system. It renders complex pages, has partial HTML 4.0 support (including tables and frames and support for multiple characters sets such as UTF-8), supports color and monochrome terminals and allows horizontal scrolling.

    It’s very useful for low resources computers because day by day the web pages are bigger and heavier. If your computer doesn’t have a suitable performance you’ll have some mistakes while you’re surfing. So, Links is much faster than any common web browser (with GUI) because it doesn’t load all the content of a website, for example, videos, flash, etc.

  • Stacer – The Linux System Optimizer You’ve Been Waiting For

    System optimizer apps are quite the thing on platforms such as Windows and Android. Their usefulness, however, is debatable considering how notorious they are when it comes to using system resources.

    On the Linux platform, however, we can almost always find the applications, a developer puts their time in developing to be mostly useful.

    Stacer is one such app created to better optimized your Linux PC in the sense that it packs quite the list of features you’d normally expect from an optimizer and more to give your system a refresh whenever you feel the need.

  • Ulauncher – A Lightweight Application Launcher for Linux

    Each Desktop environment has the own launcher and doing their job nicely but it take a while to launch the application whenever we are searching. Ulauncher is a lightweight application launcher that loads instant search results, usese low resources, and remembers your previous choices and automatically selects the best option for you.

    It’s written in Python and uses GTK as a GUI toolkit. When you are typing wrong application name, after few words or spelling, it will figure out what you meant. Use Ulauncher to open your files and directories faster with fuzzy search. Type ~ or / to start browsing. Press Alt+Enter to access the alt menu.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • ELC2017: The State of U-Boot

    Thomas Rini of the Konsulko Group presented at this week's Linux Foundation Embedded Linux Conference (ELC2017) about the state of U-Boot.

    Rini has served as the "head custodian" of U-Boot for the past number of years and presented on the overall state and accomplishments for this Universal Boot Loader most commonly associated with ARM and other architectures.

  • Nuclear - An Electron-Based Music Streaming App for Linux

    Nuclear is a beautifully designed Open Source multiplatform music streaming app that fetches media content from multiple online sources including YouTube and last.fm. The app has a simple yet glossy UI and does an excellent job at playing audio files. It was developed using Electron and can be thought of as the GUI version of mps-youtube with just a few customization features under its belt.

  • Peruse: A Comic Book Reader for Linux Desktops

    There are various comic book reader apps for Linux out there but today we bring you Peruse – an Open Source comic book reader developed by the KDE team to simplify reading comic books on your KDE desktop environment and to make it more pleasurable.

    Peruse has a simple and intuitive UI but I must admit that it is a just a couple of paces away from boring – the app needs a better-polished look to be able to compete with already famous comic book readers in the market.

  • Calibre 2.80 Open-Source eBook Manager Supports Sideloading of KFX Files, More

    Calibre developer Kovid Goyal is pleased to announce the availability of version 2.80 of his hugely popular, open-source and multi-platform ebook library management software.

    Calibre 2.80 comes two weeks after Calibre 2.79 and appears to be a major release that introduces quite a bunch of new features and new news source, besides the usual bug fixes. The most significant addition being the ability to sideload KFX files that have been created using the third-party KFX plugin for Calibre.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • systemd 233 about to be released, please help testing

    systemd 233 is scheduled to be released next week, and there is only a handful of small issues left. As usual there are tons of improvements and fixes, but the most intrusive one probably is another attempt to move from legacy cgroup v1 to a “hybrid” setup where the new unified (cgroup v2) hierarchy is mounted at /sys/fs/cgroup/unified/ and the legacy one stays at /sys/fs/cgroup/ as usual. This should provide an easier path for software like Docker or LXC to migrate to the unified hiearchy, but even that hybrid mode broke some bits.

  • Keep : A personal shell command keeper

    Introducing a new command line tool which solves the issue of memorizing commands or storing them somewhere which is difficult to find. With the grep and run commands, one can easily find their long forgotten commands and use them them right away.

  • qutebrowser v0.10.0 released

    I'm happy to annouce the release of qutebrowser v0.10.0!

    qutebrowser is a keyboard driven browser with a vim-like, minimalistic interface. It's written using PyQt and cross-platform.

    I haven't announced the v0.9.0 release in this blog (or any patch releases), but for v0.10.0 it definitely makes sense to do so, as it's mostly centered on QtWebEngine!

  • GNOME Pomodoro: A Pomodoro Timer With AppIndicator And GNOME Shell Support

    GNOME Pomodoro is, like the name suggests, a Pomodoro timer for GNOME. The application website mentions that it's currently only for GNOME Shell, however, an AppIndicator is also available.

  • 7 Awesome Open Source Build Automation Tools For Sysadmin/DevOps/Developers

    Build automation is a vital tool for devops, sysadmins, and developers. It is nothing but scripting or automating the process of compiling source code into binary. Sysadmins can use build tools to manage and update config files. Following is a list of awesome open source and popular tools associated with automating build processes on Linux or Unix-like system.

Leftovers: Software

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  • systemd 233 Is Around The Corner With More Additions, Changes
  • Peek – A Simple Animated Gif Screen Recorder for Linux

    Peek Gif Recorder is the perfect screen capture tool for short and sharp video clips.

    It was designed to use ffmpeg and imagemagick to take screencasts of your desktop and animate them to make them Gifs.

    It’s that nifty tool for those who might want to demo a bug or a brief gameplay session quickly.

  • Git v2.12.0

    The latest feature release Git v2.12.0 is now available at the usual places. It is comprised of 517 non-merge commits since v2.11.0, contributed by 80 people, 24 of which are new faces.

  • Git 2.12 Ships With A Variety Of Changes

    Looking through the release log, Git 2.12 doesn't bring any big breakthrough feature, but has a variety of improvements throughout. Git 2.12 brings updates for its p4 sub-command, finer-grained controls for what transport protocols can be used for clone/fetch/push can now be setup via the configuration file, a variety of updates to other sub-commands, several performance improvements, build updates for Cygwin, and quite a number of fixes too.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Machine Learning Speech Recognition

    Keeping up my yearly blogging cadence, it’s about time I wrote to let people know what I’ve been up to for the last year or so at Mozilla. People keeping up would have heard of the sad news regarding the Connected Devices team here. While I’m sad for my colleagues and quite disappointed in how this transition period has been handled as a whole, thankfully this hasn’t adversely affected the Vaani project. We recently moved to the Emerging Technologies team and have refocused on the technical side of things, a side that I think most would agree is far more interesting, and also far more suited to Mozilla and our core competence.

  • Nuclear is a Multi-Source Desktop Music Player

    If you feel there’s a gap in your life for an Electron-based, cross-platform music player capable of streaming from multiple online sources, I’ve a plug for you.

    Nuclear is a (rather naughty) music streaming app that “pulls in content from free sources all over the internet”. In aim it’s somewhat similar to Tomahawk, but visually owes more to an ultra camp Spotify channeling its inner radioactive diva.

  • Qt 5.9 Alpha Released

    The Qt Company today announced the much-anticipated release of the Qt 5.9 Alpha.

  • Peruse Is a Neat Comic Book Reader for KDE Desktops

    Mcomix is my go-to comic book reader for Ubuntu, but for my KDE desktop I wanted something that feels more at home in the Plasma experience.

    After a bit of digging I came across Peruse.

  • The new Online Accounts & Printer panels (and other related news!)

    Greetings, GNOMErs!

    If you’re watching closely the GNOME Control Center iterations, you probably noticed it already has a bunch of new panels: Keyboard, Mouse & Touchpad, and other panels like Sharing, Privacy and Search that don’t need to be ported.

  • A new journey – GNOME Foundation Executive Director

    For those who haven’t heard, I’ve been appointed as the new Executive Director of the GNOME Foundation, and I started last week on the 15th February.

    It’s been an interesting week so far, mainly meeting lots of people and trying to get up to speed with what looks like an enormous job! However, I’m thoroughly excited by the opportunity and am very grateful for everyone’s warm words of welcome so far.

Leftovers: Software

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  • 3 mind mapping tools in Fedora

    In a previous Magazine article, we covered tracking your time and tasks. In that article we mentioned some mind mapping tools. Now we’ll cover three mind mapping apps you can use in Fedora. You can use these tools to generate and manipulate maps that show your thoughts. Mind maps can help you to improve your creativity and effectiveness. You can use them for time management, to organize tasks, to overview complex contexts, to sort your ideas, and more.

  • 10 command-line tools for data analysis in Linux

    So you've landed on some data you want to analyze. Where do you begin?

    Many people used to working in a graphical environment might default to using a spreadsheet tool, but there's another way that might prove to be faster and more efficient, with just a little more effort. And you don't need to become an expert in a statistical modeling language or a big data toolset to take advantage of these tools.

    I'm talking about the Linux command line. Just using some tools that you've probably already got installed on your computer, you can learn a lot about a dataset without ever leaving your terminal. Long-time Linux users will of course laugh—they've been using many of these tools for years to parse logs and understand configuration tools. But for the Linux newcomer, the revelation that you've got a whole data analysis toolkit already at your fingertips can be a welcomed surprise.

  • Trojita Is a Super Fast Desktop Email Client for Linux

    If you’re looking for a fast, IMAP compatible email client for Linux, why not try Trojita?

    Trojita aims to fetch and display email as quickly, and as efficiently, as possible. The open-source email app adheres to ‘open standards and modern technologies’, and is built around ‘the vendor-neutrality that IMAP provides’.

  • gparted 0.28.1

    A new version of gparted was released recently and I have updated the Fedora package to the latest version - 0.28.1.

    This version brings a rather exciting (at least, to me) update - ability to copy and resize already open LUKS filesystems.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Tips for tpp and patat

    You might be surprised to learn that there are programs for running presentations in a terminal.

    No, I don't mean opening PowerPoint or Impress slides one after the other, as images in a frame-buffered console. I mean presenting slides coded for the terminal, in a terminal.

  • Introduction to LaTeXila - a multi-language LaTeX editor for Linux

    LaTeXila is a multi-language LaTeX editor for Linux users who prefer the GTK+ looks. The software is simple, easy to use, adequately powerful and customizable, so if you’re interested in LaTeX you should give this tool a try. In the following quick guide, I will showcase how to get started with LaTeXila and what its main features are. But first...

  • Nautilus 3.24 to Bring Desktop Support for Wayland Sessions, Easy Root Browsing

    The GNOME 3.24 desktop environment is coming in only one month from today, on March 22, and it will bring with it a lot of new features for many of its core components and applications, including the Nautilus (Files) file manager.

    GNOME developer Carlos Soriano is sharing with us today the upcoming features of Nautilus 3.24, as well all the improvements and bug fixes that landed so far, and what didn't make it in the release, which will be available for all users as part of the GNOME 3.24 Stack.

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu and elementary

  • System76 wants to build its own hardware for its Linux-based computers
    System76 is building up quite a name for itself, being one of a very limited number of companies selling only computers running Linux-based operating systems. Now the aim is to branch out; System76 wants to design and build its own hardware, while representing the open source community as it does so. At the moment, the hardware used in System76 systems is outsourced, but in the future this will change. The company says that it is moving into phase three of its development cycle, and this "moves product design and manufacturing in house." And you should set your expectations high: "We're about to build the Model S of computers. Something so brilliant and beautiful that reviewers will have to add an 11 to their scores."
  • AppCenter Spotlight: Beta Testers
    Over the past month we’ve been beta testing the new AppCenter with a number of developers, from elementary OS contributors to backers of our Indiegogo campaign. After testing out the submission process and getting some apps into the store (and seeing rapid updates!), I wanted to take a moment to highlight some of the first apps.
  • elementary OS to get improved AppCenter, showing off a few new applications
    I have to hand it to the elementary OS guys, they have a massive focus on design and it does look quite incredible. It is easily one of the best looking Linux distributions, which I do admire. Their new AppCenter, for example, looks extremely clean and clear.

Beijing Zoo is No Place for Pandas

Pandas in Beijing Zoo
Photo credit: Nick Hopkins

I am a Panda lover. I work as a support engineer in an I.T company here in the United Kingdom. Most of my spare time is spent watching different Panda videos -- both old and new videos. Basically, it is my therapy; a 'stress release' for me. I find them to be adorable and precious creatures. As a matter of fact, I would like to volunteer to come to Sichuan. I want to experience and feel what it's like to be a Panda keeper, to be able to interact with them for real. The Panda is China's National Treasure, so it's a shame to watch the Panda videos from Beijing zoo, as the place is disgusting and not ideal for Pandas to live in (and for sure for all the rest of the animals who unfortunately got stuck in this prison cell).

The place looks like a ghost town. Lifeless and languished. Knowing that Pandas wear a thick fur on their body, can you imagine what it feels for them in 30C or 35C (summer temperature)? What it probably feels like all the time? Come on, if you really care, you must do something now, otherwise these Pandas will die. Please bring them back to their sanctuary where they really belong.

Linux 4.11 File-System Tests: EXT4, F2FS, XFS & Btrfs

With the Linux 4.11 kernel potentially being released as soon as today, here are some fresh benchmarks of Btrfs / EXT4 / F2FS / XFS on a solid-state drive and comparing the performance of 4.11 Git back to Linux 4.9 and 4.10. For those wondering if the block/file-system changes of Linux 4.11 have any impact on EXT4/F2FS/XFS/Btrfs for common I/O workloads or how these file-systems are comparing on this latest kernel, here are some benchmarks. Read more

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