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Software

Software: Docker, VMs and Graphic Design

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Software
  • 10+ top open-source tools for Docker security

    For container security, you'll find plenty of open-source tools that can help prevent another debacle like the one at Tesla, which suffered a Kubernetes cluster breach. But container security is still tricky, so you need to know which utilities to add to your arsenal.

    Sure, there are commercial container security products out there, but open-source projects can take you pretty far. Many focus on auditing, tracking Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE) databases and benchmarks established by CIS, the National Vulnerability Database, and other bodies. Tools then scan the container image, reveal its contents, and compare the contents against these manifests of known vulnerabilities.

    Automating container auditing, as well as using other container security processes, can be a huge boon for enterprises by helping teams catch problems early in the build pipeline.

    While there are plenty of open-source container security tools out there, here are the best, most mature ones with the largest user communities.

  • ANNOUNCE: virt-viewer 7.0 release

    I am happy to announce a new bugfix release of virt-viewer 7.0 (gpg), including experimental Windows installers for Win x86 MSI (gpg) and Win x64 MSI (gpg). The virsh and virt-viewer binaries in the Windows builds should now successfully connect to libvirtd, following fixes to libvirt’s mingw port.

  • 5 GNU/Linux Graphic Design Apps in AppImage [Ed: Inkscape, GIMP, Scribus, Krita, and Drawio]

The evolution of package managers

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Software

Every computerized device uses some form of software to perform its intended tasks. In the early days of software, products were stringently tested for bugs and other defects. For the last decade or so, software has been released via the internet with the intent that any bugs would be fixed by applying new versions of the software. In some cases, each individual application has its own updater. In others, it is left up to the user to figure out how to obtain and upgrade software.

Linux adopted early the practice of maintaining a centralized location where users could find and install software. In this article, I'll discuss the history of software installation on Linux and how modern operating systems are kept up to date against the never-ending torrent of CVEs.

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9 Productivity Tools for Linux That Are Worth Your Attention

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Software

There are so many distractions and unproductive activities that affect our performance at the workplace, and so many methods to increase focus and work efficiency. If you’re looking for a way to improve your productivity and stay organized, consider using special software to create a productive work environment.

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Pitivi Development Updates

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Development
Software
Movies
  • Writing a freesound plugin for Pitivi

    I always say that my first geeky passion is computer programming. But that is a passion I developed about 8 years ago. Another geeky passion I have recently developed has been security analysis. Because of this reason I started a Youtube channel the previous year called “Inversor Moderno” (“Modern investor” in English). Besides the fact that I prefer to follow the fundamental analysis and to be more specific the “value investing” philosophy, I started the channel with the purpose of leaning and teaching more about investments and specifically about quantitative trading. However, it has been a long time since the last time I uploaded a video.

    [...]

    I am still not sure if I should use a GtkListBox or if a GtkTreeView would look better. Also I don’t know what message should be shown when no result is found after searching and also what message to show when the Freesound library window is open for the first time.

  • [GSoC 2018] Welcome Window Integration in Pitivi – Conclusion

    In my last post (link), I talked about integrating “Search” and “Remove” feature in Pitivi’s welcome window. Search feature allowed for easy browsing of recent projects and remove feature allowed removing project(s) from recent projects list.

    In this post, I want to introduce “Project Thumbnails”. I have successfully integrated project thumbnails in recent projects list. This is the last task under issue 1302.

    The main idea behind thumbnails is to give the user a hint what a certain project is about. This can be seen as information in addition to project name and uri which helps to identify the desired project faster and more easily.

Kiwi TCMS 5.0

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Software

We're happy to announce Kiwi TCMS and tcms-api version 5.0! This release introduces object history tracking, removal of old functionality and unused code, lots of internal updates and bug fixes.

The new kiwitcms/kiwi:latest docker image has Image ID 468de0abe8a8. https://demo.kiwitcms.org has also been updated!

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Graphical Abstinence, Living the Terminal Life

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Software
Ubuntu

In today’s modern world of multi-gigabyte browser based applications we can get overwhelmed by busy, interrupting graphical environments. Sometimes it’s nice to downsize and focus, VT100-style. So let’s leverage the power of the terminal to get stuff done with a selection of apps, utilities and a couple of games for your Linux console.

You can stay up to date with our editorial picks by following Snapcraft on Facebook where we share three new and interesting snaps a week. We’d also love to hear what your favourite snaps are, perhaps you’ve found something we’ve missed. Let us know!

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The Most Used Essential Linux Applications

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Software

2018 has been an awesome year for a lot of applications, especially those that are both free and open source. And while various Linux distributions come with a number of default apps, users are free to take them out and use any of the free or paid alternatives of their choice.

Today, we bring you a list of Linux applications that have been able to make it to users’ Linux installations almost all the time despite the butt-load of other alternatives.

To simply put, any app on this list is among the most used in its category, and if you haven’t already tried it out you are probably missing out. Enjoy!

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Brian Kernighan Remembers the Origins of ‘grep’

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GNU
Software

This month saw the release of a fascinating oral history, in which 76-year-old Brian Kernighan remembers the origins of the Unix command grep.

Kernighan is already a legend in the world of Unix — recognized as the man who coined the term Unix back in 1970. His last initial also became the “k” in awk — and the “K” when people cite the iconic 1978 “K&R book” about C programming. The original Unix Programmer’s Manual calls Kernighan an “expositor par excellence,” and since 2000 he’s been a computer science professor at Princeton University — after 30 years at the historic Computing Science Research Center at Bell Laboratories.

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Software: Music Tagger MusicBrainz, Pulseaudio, COPR, AV1

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Software
  • Music Tagger MusicBrainz Picard 2.0 Ported To Python 3 And PyQt5, Brings Improved UI And More

    MusicBrainz Picard version 2.0 was released after more than 6 years since the previous major release (1.0). The new version was ported to Python 3 and PyQt5 and includes Retina and HiDPI support, improved UI and performance, as well as numerous bug fixes.

    [...]

    MusicBrainz Picard 2.0 was ported to Python 3 (requires at least version 3.5) and PyQt5 (>= 5.7). The release announcement mentions that a side effect of this is that "Picard should look better and in general feel more responsive". Also, many encoding-related bugs were fixed with the transition to Python 3, like the major issue of not supporting non-UTF8 filenames.

  • Pulseaudio: the more things change, the more they stay the same

    Such a classic Linux story.

    For a video I'll be showing during tonight's planetarium presentation (Sextants, Stars, and Satellites: Celestial Navigation Through the Ages, for anyone in the Los Alamos area), I wanted to get HDMI audio working from my laptop, running Debian Stretch. I'd done that once before on this laptop (HDMI Presentation Setup Part I and Part II) so I had some instructions to follow; but while aplay -l showed the HDMI audio device, aplay -D plughw:0,3 didn't play anything and alsamixer and alsamixergui only showed two devices, not the long list of devices I was used to seeing.

    Web searches related to Linux HDMI audio all pointed to pulseaudio, which I don't use, and I was having trouble finding anything for plain ALSA without pulse. In the old days, removing pulseaudio used to be the cure for practically every Linux audio problem. But I thought to myself, It's been a couple years since I actually tried pulse, and people have told me it's better now. And it would be a relief to have pulseaudio working so things like Firefox would Just Work. Maybe I should try installing it and see what happens.

  • 4 cool new projects to try in COPR for July 2018

    COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the Fedora set of packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by Fedora infrastructure or signed by the project. However, it can be a neat way to try new or experimental software.

    Here’s a set of new and interesting projects in COPR.

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: AV1

    Open source supporters and companies are teaming up to offer the next general of video delivery. The Alliance for Open Media (AOMEDIA) is made up of companies like Mozilla, Google, Cisco, Amazon and Netflix, and on a mission to create an open video format and new codec called AV1.

    In a blog post about the AOMedia Video, or AV1, video codec, Mozilla technical writer Judy DeMocker laid out the numbers; within the next few years, video is expected to account for over 80 percent of Internet traffic. And unbeknownst to many, all of that free, high-quality video content we’ve come to expect all across the Internet costs quite a bit for the people providing it via codec licensing fees. The most common, H.264, is used all over the place to provide the compression required to send video quickly and with quality intact.

  •  

Convert video using Handbrake

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Software
Movies

Recently, when my son asked me to digitally convert some old DVDs of his high school basketball games, I immediately knew I would use Handbrake. It is an open source package that has all the tools necessary to easily convert video into formats that can be played on MacOS, Windows, Linux, iOS, Android, and other platforms.

Handbrake is open source and distributable under the GPLv2 license. It's easy to install on MacOS, Windows, and Linux, including both Fedora and Ubuntu. In Linux, once it's installed, it can be launched from the command line with $ handbrake or selected from the graphical user interface. (In my case, that is GNOME 3.)

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More in Tux Machines

FSFE Resignation and Parabola GNU/Linux-libre Needs Hardware

  • Daniel Pocock: Resigning as the FSFE Fellowship's representative
    I've recently sent the following email to fellows, I'm posting it here for the benefit of the wider community and also for any fellows who don't receive the email.
  • Parabola GNU/Linux-libre: Server loss
    However, that sponsorship has come to an end. We are alright for now; the server that 1984 Hosting is sponsoring us with is capable of covering our immediate needs. We are looking for a replacement server and are favoring a proprietor that is a "friend of freedom," if anyone in the community has a suggestion.

Red Hat: News and Financial Results

KDE and GNOME: Krita, Bionic and AppStream/AppData

  • Let’s Tally Some Votes!
    We’re about a week into the campaign, and almost 9000 euros along the path to bug fixing. So we decided to do some preliminary vote tallying! And share the results with you all, of course! On top is Papercuts, with 84 votes. Is that because it’s the default choice? Or because you are telling us that Krita is fine, it just needs to be that little bit smoother that makes all the difference? If the latter, we won’t disagree, and yesterday Boudewijn fixed one of the things that must have annoyed everyone who wanted to create a custom image: now the channel depths are finally shown in a logical order!
  • Almost Bionic
    Maybe it’s all the QA we added but issues kept cropping up with Bionic. All those people who had encrypted home folders in xenial soon found they had no files in bionic because support had been dropped so we had to add a quirk to keep access to the files. Even yesterday a badly applied patch to the installer broke installs on already partitioned disks which it turns out we didn’t do QA for so we had to rejig our tests as well as fix the problem. Things are turning pleasingly green now so we should be ready to launch our Bionic update early next week. Do give the ISO images one last test and help us out by upgrading any existing installs and reporting back. Hasta pronto.
  • Speeding up AppStream: mmap’ing XML using libxmlb
    AppStream and the related AppData are XML formats that have been adopted by thousands of upstream projects and are being used in about a dozen different client programs. The AppStream metadata shipped in Fedora is currently a huge 13Mb XML file, which with gzip compresses down to a more reasonable 3.6Mb. AppStream is awesome; it provides translations of lots of useful data into basically all languages and includes screenshots for almost everything. GNOME Software is built around AppStream, and we even use a slightly extended version of the same XML format to ship firmware update metadata from the LVFS to fwupd.

Security: Updates, NewEgg Breach, "Master Password" and CLIP OS

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • NewEgg cracked in breach, hosted card-stealing code within its own checkout

    The popular computer and electronics Web retailer NewEgg has apparently been hit by the same payment-data-stealing attackers who targeted TicketMaster UK and British Airways. The attackers, referred to by researchers as Magecart, managed to inject 15 lines of JavaScript into NewEgg's webstore checkout that forwarded credit card and other data to a server with a domain name that made it look like part of NewEgg's Web infrastructure. It appears that all Web transactions over the past month were affected by the breach.

  • "Master Password" Is A Password Manager Alternative That Doesn't Store Passwords
    Master Password is a different way of using passwords. Instead of the "know one password, save all others somewhere" way of managing passwords used by regular password managers, Master Password's approach is "know one password, generate all the others".
  • French cyber-security agency open-sources CLIP OS, a security hardened OS
    The National Cybersecurity Agency of France, also known as ANSSI (Agence Nationale de la Sécurité des Systèmes d'Information), has open-sourced CLIP OS, an in-house operating system its engineers had developed to address the needs of the French government administration. In a press release, ANSSI described CLIP OS as a "Linux-based operating system [that] incorporates a set of security mechanisms that give it a very high level of resistance to malicious code and allow it to protect sensitive information."