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Software

Software: Cockpit 150, Komorebi 2, FFmpeg and Chromium

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  • Cockpit 150

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from versions 149 and 150.

  • Your Desktop Wallpaper Just Got Interesting Again

    Komorebi 2 claims to be “faster, smoother, and better” than before. There are new features, a new codebase and (naturally) new wallpapers.

  • FFmpeg's VP9 Decoder Is Much Faster Thanks To GSoC 2017

    As we previously reported on, there was a Google Summer of Code project this year optimizing FFmpeg's VP9 decoder particularly around AVX2 instructions and threading. The project was a success and VP9 decoding should be much faster with FFmpeg as a result.

    GSoC '17 student developer Ilia Valiakhmetov spent his time optimizing the FFmpeg VP9 code for AVX (Advanced Vector Extensions) as well as implementing tile threading support. His AVX2 optimizations are already in FFmpeg Git while his tile threading code is still being reviewed.

  • Chromium Now Supports GPU Sandboxing With Radeon Graphics On Linux

    Chrome/Chromium supports GPU sandboxing for security purposes and now it will work fine with the AMD graphics on Linux.

    As explained in this Git commit that was just merged minutes ago, "Default sandboxing fails for AMD platform as the GPU process spawns multiple threads. So GPU sandboxing needs to be started early. And all dependent libraries need to be preloaded."

Software: PulseAudio, PiCluster, Wikit, massif-visualizer, Kdenlive, OpenShot, Elisa, and GNOME

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  • News: New release of PulseAudio.
  • PiCluster – A Simple, Web-based Docker Management Application

    PiCluster is a simple, open source, web-based docker management application used to manage Docker containers across multiple hosts. Unlike Docker Swarm or Kubernetes, PiCluster is easy to setup and use. The latest PiCluster version has brought new features. It makes the process of creating containers much easier than ever. Say for example, the users can now upload a zip of their Dockerfile’s to the PiCluster web console and the files will be copied to every node and extracted in the Docker directory specified in PiCluster config file. Also, when a container is added, the image will be automatically built and run in a single step. In previous releases, users would have to manually create the container. It will work on both 32-bit and 64-bit platforms.

  • Wikit – Get Wikipedia Summaries From Commandline In Linux

    Wikipedia has several millions of articles and the number of articles are steadily increasing every single day. It is the first place that comes to my mind when I’m looking for knowledge. Today, I have stumbled upon a simple, yet useful command-line utility called “Wikit”. It displays the summary of any Wikipedia article in Terminal. As we all know already, the Wikipedia has the largest and most comprehensive articles. If you don’t want to waste time to read a comprehensive Wikipedia article, you can then use Wikit to get Wikipedia summaries from commandline. To be precise, Wikit will display the first few paragraphs (the summary, of course) before the table of contents of a Wikipedia article.

  • massif-visualizer 0.7.0 released

    Massif Visualizer is a visualiser for output generated by Valgrind’s massif tool. It shows you graphs which measure how much heap memory your program uses.

  • Kdenlive 17.08.1 released

    Although the team is at full throttle getting ready for the 17.12 big refactoring release, we make available the first point release of the 17.08 series bringing various bugfixes and usability improvements. Stay tuned for testing the refactoring branch packages to be announced soon.

  • OpenShot 2.4 Released, Focuses on Stability

    A new version of OpenShot, the crash-happy open-source non-linear video editor, is available to download. While the previous couple of releases were big on features the latest release is a “stability-focused release”, says project lead Jonathan Thomas.

  • OpenShot 2.4.0 Released | Improved Stability & More!

    The latest and greatest version of OpenShot Video Editor (version 2.4.0) has been officially released, and I'm proud to bring you all the details! This is a stability-focused release, and much of the effort was "behind-the-scenes" type work.

  • OpenShot 2.4 Brings Better Stability To This Open-Source Video Editor

    Jon Thomas has announced the release of the OpenShot Video Editor 2.4 released. Among the features of OpenShot 2.4 are "vastly improved stability" for this non-linear, cross-platform video editor.

  • Essential Tools for Producing High Quality Podcasts on Linux

    Podcasts are a booming business, and many audio pros are seeing more and more work dedicated to this platform. Mac and Windows users have plenty of options for professionally recording and mastering audio, but Linux users aren’t quite as lucky. Yet if you really love the penguin, there are still awesome podcast tools for producing high-quality podcasts on Linux.

  • Twitter Finally Rolls Out Night Mode Feature to Linux, Windows and Mac Users

    The long-anticipated Night Mode feature is ready to conquer your desktop, help stop eye strain, and help you fall asleep after a long night of twittering. The feature is currently rolling out to the desktop version of twitter.com and should be supported on all modern web browsers, including Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, and Opera.

  • Elisa, Accessibility and other News

    I should be communicating more often about development related to the Elisa music player. Recently Safa Alfulaij added support for right-to-left interface. This is a very good excuse to talk about what happened since my previous post.

  • GNOME 3.26rc2 (2.25.92) RELEASED
  • GNOME 3.26 RC2 Released: The Final Step For This Big GNOME Update

    GNOME 3.25.92 is available today, marking the last development release before the official GNOME 3.26 debut.

  • EA's Frostbite Engine Has Been Internally Up And Running On Linux

    While not for public consumption at least for now, the Electronic Arts' Frostbite game engine has seen internal Linux testing/development.

    EA developer Johan Andersson was comparing the size of the Linux kernel source tree to that of their Frostbite game engine: there are more files, lines, comments, and code in Frostbite than in the Linux kernel. Johan has been a technical fellow and director at EA since 2000.

  • Shuffle the Decks with These Ace Open Source Card Games

    A card game is a game that uses playing cards as the main way the game is played. The cards can be a standard deck of 52 French playing cards with 4 suits of Spades, Hearts, Diamonds, and Clubs. Or the cards can be game-specific. There is a plethora of card games available, with families of related games.

    Card games offer many positive attributes. They can improve mental skills, memory and logic. They can test your patience, help you focus, and are popular for all ages. Having a good memory is essential to a person’s overall well-being. A good way to improve memory is playing fun games. Whether it’s a board game or a deck of cards, putting your brain to work definitely has its advantages. The earlier a person who has a poor working memory can begin to strengthen it, the more successful they’ll be in life.

Wine Staging 2.16

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Software: Flathub, gPodder, PulseAudio, MConnect

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Software
  • The Flathub Website Now Lists Apps, Lets You Install Them

    Read this site regularly enough and you’ll learn that I love Flathub. Flathub, for those of you who haven’t heard of it, is the quasi-official app store for apps packaged and distributed using Flatpak. But it hasn’t been easy to find out which apps are available on it. Until now.

  • A look at gPodder – Podcast player for GNU/Linux

    Podcasts have been around for years now, but I’ve noticed an increase among my social circles in people using them, and so using that as a general assumption that others are also starting to enjoy them I thought I should show off my favourite application for downloading and listening to them on my GNU/Linux systems; gPodder.

    gPodder is a GTK+ client that is written using Python, designed to be a podcast client and media aggregator. The interface is very minimalistic, so if you're looking for something with a bunch of bells and whistles, you might want to look elsewhere.

  • PulseAudio 11 Debuts with Support for Newer AirPlay Hardware, Bluetooth Goodies

    The open-source and cross-platform PulseAudio sound system has been updated recently to version 11, a major release adding numerous new features and improvements to the audio to make it sound better on your favorite GNU/Linux distribution.

  • MConnect, the Android GNOME Shell Extension, Has Been Updated

    An updated version of mConnect, the GNOME extension that helps you integrate your Android device with the Linux desktop, is now available. Rolling out on the GNOME Extensions site now, the update adds minor improvements to the Android-ingratiating add-on, including support for keyboard shortcuts, and tooltips to provide helpful pointers about its various features.

Software: Telegram on Tizen, Nginx and Chrome 61

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Software: Sysdig, JumpFm, Nuvola Player

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  • Sysdig – A Powerful System Monitoring and Troubleshooting Tool for Linux

    Sysdig is an open-source, cross-platform, powerful and flexible system monitoring and troubleshooting tool for Linux; it also works on Windows and Mac OSX but with limited functionality and can be used for system analysis, inspection and debugging.

  • JumpFm – An Electron-based File Manager Focused on Performance

    We have covered a couple of Linux file managers recently and the genre doesn’t seem to be ending anytime soon. Today, we bring you a file manager that is so skilled at navigation that it had to contain “jump” in its name and go by the name of JumpFm.

    JumpFm is a cross-platform dual panel file manager with a focus on efficient directory navigation, automatic bookmarking, and NPM-based extensibility.

  • Nuvola Player – Stream Cloud Music Directly from Your Desktop

    Nuvola Player is an open source web-based music streaming application with a focus on providing more features than the typical web browsers would.

    It is built to look and feel like a native desktop application as much as possible with features like support for multimedia keys, integration with various sound menus, launchers, desktop notifications, Last FM, lyrics fetching, and Libre FM scrobling.

    The web-based music player features a simple minimal design-based intuitive User Interface that is customizable with themes (both light and dark color schemes available) and will adapt to whatever Linux desktop environment you are running.

Software: Wire, Shutter, Dimmer

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Software
  • Do You Use 'Wire' On Your Mobile? If Yes, Here Is Linux Client For You From Secure Repo

    Wire is a communication application mainly focused on privacy. Wire is available for almost every platform Linux, Windows, Mac and mobile devices, its applications across all platforms uniformly use state-of-the-art encryption mechanisms that are recognized as reliable by experts and the community.
    Wire offers end-to-end encrypted text messaging, video, voice calls and media, all conversation are private and secured, all conversations are available on multiple devices and platforms without weakening security.

  • Screenshot Tool ‘Shutter’ Gets First Update in Over 2 Years

    It’s been well over two and a half years since feature-rich screenshot tool Shutter was last updated — but a new release is finally here! Shutter’s last release was back in 2014, so this update has been a little overdue. But don’t get too excited; the wait doesn’t mean the app picks up any new features.

  • Desktop Dimmer Application Can Help Your Eyes To Stay Safe

    Well, you can adjust your screen brightness for your eyes but at some point. Dimmer lets you make your dark screen to darker. It is a free utility for setting the brightness of your main screen as well as external monitors. You can choose which screens will be set to the selected brightness level. Perfect for dark room, planetariums or anyone working in the dark with multiple monitors. For video presentations use dimmer to dim your laptop screen, while leaving the VGA output at full brightness on the projector. From the system tray you access Dimmer slider, the range from 0% (Means full brightness) to all the way to 100%.

Software: Enpass, Sublime Text, Renames, Clementine and GPMDP

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Software
  • Enpass Is The Free Cross-Platform Password Manager

    Previously we covered KeePassXC password manager which is also free application. Here comes another password manager called Enpass, it is free and cross-platform available for Linux, Windows, Mac, Android, Blackberry, Windows Phone and iOS.

  • Sublime Text: You May Love This Text/Code Editor

    If you are a developer then you must have your favorite text editor on your system, but it is always a good idea to give a try to new application. Sublime Text Editor is proprietary application and been around since 2008, it is written using C++ and Python programming language, it cross-platform available for Linux, Windows and Mac.

  • These Rename Utilities Can Help You Rename Batch Files In Linux

    In Linux there are multiple ways to rename files and folders in batch but from command-line it can be difficult for some users. Lets checkout some useful rename utilities that are available for Linux.

  • Oh my darling, oh my darling Clementine

    Is there a perfect media player? Of course not. All right, then how about a reasonable one, combining a pleasant and intuitive interface plus a wide rage of great features? That sounds like a nice, ambitious idea, but I have yet to find the software that ticks all the relevant boxes.

    For the past decade and a half, I've mostly resorted to using whatever default program operating systems throw at me, slowly gravitating toward VideoLAN (VLC) as my app of choice, mostly because of its super-powerful codec backend. But then I've also played with many other software, with a sweet spot for Amarok. Now, I think I may have found my unicorn, and Clementine be its name. Onwards!

  • Do You Use Google Play Service? If Yes, Then Try Google Play Music Desktop Player (GPMDP)

    We don't know why Google do not develop applications for their services for Linux/Unix, there are Google Chrome and Google Earth applications available for Linux but not for all of Google services, many of us want Google Drive. Well, for Google Play service there is an 3rd party application available for all desktop platforms.

Software: Chat/IM Solution, Magit, GnuCash and LuaTeX

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  • The Quest for a Common Chat/IM Solution

    A Free/ Open Source Software community usually uses several means of communication: Among them are email, forums, code review and bug tracking systems, nowadays also video chat systems, but one of the central communication channels is usually real-time text communication, also known as instant messaging or chat.

    Traditionally, IRC has been the cornerstone of chat in the FOSS world, as it is open, easy for everyone to join (no account needed) and not in control of any single organization. IRC still does what it was designed for perfectly well, but while it is still basically the same as it was 20 years ago, the world of chat and instant messaging around it has evolved significantly in the meantime: Instant messaging services such as WhatsApp or Telegram (or KakaoTalk, WeChat or Line in Asia) are used by pretty much everyone (and their parents, literally) and systems such as Slack are dominating company communication, and those systems have shaped how people expect a chat system to look and behave.

  • Magit for non-Emacs users

    Unfortunately most potential users are not aware of Magit. Others might be aware of its existence, but would not consider giving it a try because it is implemented as an extension to the Emacs text editor, and that’s not what they are using.

    That’s something I intend to change over the next year, beginning with this article, because I think that Magit can be an excellent Git interface even for users of other editors and IDEs. I am under the impression that many Git users want, or would at least appreciate, something like Magit. It seems worthwhile to invest some time to help some of those potential users get over the initial hurdles. And yes, I do hope that some of those people will support the fundraising campaign.

  • Business accounting with GnuCash

    The first stop in the search for a free accounting system that can replace QuickBooks is a familiar waypoint: the GnuCash application. GnuCash has been around for many years and is known primarily as a personal-finance tool, but it has acquired some business features as well. The question is: are those business features solid enough to allow the program to serve as a replacement for QuickBooks?

    The first order of business is importing existing data into the system. That is not a straightforward task, but it can be done; see this article for the gory details. The result was a 1.8MB XML file containing the company's accounting data since the beginning of 2016. Starting GnuCash with that file takes about 20 seconds on a reasonably modern laptop. It's amazing how long 20 seconds can seem sometimes.

  • LuaTeX comes of age

    TeX has been the tool of choice for the preparation of papers and documents for mathematicians, physicists, and other authors of technical material for many years. Although it takes some effort to learn how to use this venerable work of free software, its devotees become addicted to its ability to produce publication-quality manuscripts from a plain-text, version-control-friendly format.

    Most TeX users use LaTeX, which is a set of commands and macros built on top of TeX that allow automated cross-referencing, indexing, creation of a table of contents, and automatic formatting of many types of documents. TeX, LaTeX, a host of associated utilities, fonts, and related programs are assembled into a large package called TeX Live. It's available through the package managers of many Linux distributions, but to get an up-to-date version, one often needs to download it from its maintainers directly.

Wine 2.16

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  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 2.16 is now available.

  • Wine 2.16 Released

    Wine 2.16 is now available as the latest bi-weekly development release for running Windows games and applications on Linux and other operating systems.

    Wine 2.16 introduces support for pasting metafiles in RichEdit, better support for grayscale PNGs, support for safety features in library loading, better handling of GdiPlus transforms, DirectWrite rendering improvements, and 19 known bug fixes.

  • Wine 2.16 released with various improvements
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Oracle Adds Initial Support for Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS to VirtualBox

Oracle recently updated their VirtualBox open-source and cross-platform virtualization software with initial support for the latest Linux 4.14 LTS kernel series. VirtualBox 5.2.2 is the first maintenance update to the latest VirtualBox 5.2 stable series of the application, and it looks like it can be compiled and used on GNU/Linux distribution running the recently released Linux 4.14 LTS kernel. It also makes it possible to run distros powered by Linux kernel 4.14 inside VirtualBox VMs. Read more

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • How a Linux stronghold turned back to Windows: Key dates in Munich's LiMux project [Ed: This explains the progression of Microsoft's war on GNU/Linux, typically using proxies]
    The project is temporarily put on hold while a study investigates whether it could be derailed by software patents.
  • End of an open source era: Linux pioneer Munich confirms switch to Windows 10 [Ed: Microsoft paid (bribed) all the right people, got a Microsoft fan -- by his own admission -- in power, gifted him for this]
    Mayor Dieter Reiter said there's never been a unified Linux landscape in the city. "We always had mixed systems and what we have here is the possibility of going over to a single system. Having two operating systems is completely uneconomic.
  • Ubuntu Podcast: S10E38 – Soft Knowledgeable Burn
    This week we refactor a home network, discuss how gaming on Linux has evolved and grown in recent years, bring you a blend of love and go over your feedback.
  • Live ISOs for Slackware-current 20171122
    I have released an update of the ‘liveslak‘ scripts. I needed the tag for a batch of new ISO images for the Slackware Live Edition. These are based on the latest Slackware-current dated “Wed Nov 22 05:27:06 UTC 2017“) i.e. yesterday and that means, the ISOs are going to boot into the new 4.14.1 kernel.
  • Am I willing to pay the price to support ethical hardware?
    The planned obsolescence is even worse with tablets and smartphones, whose components are all soldered down. The last tablet with a removable battery was the Dell Venue 11 Pro (Haswell version) announced in October 2013, but it was an expensive Windows device that cost as much as a mid-range laptop. The last Android tablet with a removable battery was the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 (GT-N8000 series), released in August 2012. It is still possible to find mid-range smartphones with removable batteries. Last year the only high end phones with removable batteries were the LG G5 and V20, but even LG has given up on the idea of making phones that will last longer than 2 years once the battery starts to degrade after roughly 500 full charge and discharge cycles. Every flagship phone introduced in 2017 now has its battery sealed in the case. According to the gmsarena.com database, the number of new smartphone models with non-replaceable batteries grew from 1.9% in 2011 to 26.7% in 2014, and now to 90.3% in 2017. It is highly likely that not a single model of smartphone introduced next year will have a replaceable battery.

More Coverage of New Lumina Release

  • Lumina 1.4 Desktop Environment Released
    The TrueOS BSD folks working on their Qt5-powered Lumina Desktop Environment have issued a new feature update of their open-source desktop.
  • Lumina Desktop 1.4.0 Released
    Lumina 1.4.0 carries a number of changes, optimisations, and feature improvements. Lumina is the default desktop of TrueOS, a BSD-based operating system. The desktop itself is lightweight, modular, built using Qt, and uses Fluxbox for window management. Although Lumina is mostly aimed at BSD users it also runs on Linux, including Fedora, Arch and — *mario coin sfx* — Ubuntu.