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Software

Latte Dock 0.6 and HandBrake 1.0.3

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Software
  • Latte Dock v0.6 - fresh air...

    Latte Dock v.0.6 has been released!!! The first stable Latte release has been just landed!

  • HandBrake 1.0.3 Has Been Released

    For those who don’t know, HandBrake is an open-source multiplatform multithreaded video transcoder. It is used for converting DVD or Bluray discs to formats like MP4, MKV, H.264, MPEG-4 or other formats. You can also encode audio files like AAC, MP3, Flac, AC3 etc

5 of the Best Personal Finance Managers for Linux

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GNU
Linux
Software

There is certainly no shortage of financial apps available for Linux. If you are looking for an app to help you keep track of the money you earn and spend, take a look at five of the best personal finance managers for Linux.

For simple bookkeeping, you can use a spreadsheet such as LibreOffice Calc. For more advanced tasks, a personal finance manager is much better. Some of the managers available might be too complicated for an ordinary user, but others are simple and can be used by non-accountants as well. I’ve tried to include apps from both groups – full-fledged financial managers you can use for pro purposes, as well as easier apps for the average Joe or Jane.

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Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Sigil 0.9.8 (Open-Source EPUB Reader) Has Been Released

    As you may know, Sigil is an open-source, multi-platform, lightweight, EPUB reader. Most important features: support for UTF-16, regular expression find and replace support, support for importing EPUB and HTML files, WYSIWYG editing feature in Book View, control over editing EPUB syntax in Code View, table of contents generator, spell checking with either default or user configured dictionaries.

  • Wireshark 2.2.5 Has Been Released

    As you already know, Wireshark is an open-source protocol analyzer software, very used for monitoring the network traffic.

  • Audacity 2.1.3 Has Been Released

    As you may know Audacity is an open-source, multi-platform audio editor and recorder, running on Linux, Windows and Mac OS X.

  • GScan2PDF 1.7.3 Has Been Released, Bringing Changes

    As you know, GScan2PDF is an app for scanning pages and exporting them to PDFs. The user can export scans one by one, in separate PDF files, or export scans all together, in one PDF.

    The latest version available is Gscan2PDF 1.7.3, which has been recently released, coming with a bunch of changes.

  • OpenShot 2.3 ships with real-time video transforms

    Open source video editor OpenShot has just hit version 2.3 in what the developer calls "one of the biggest updates ever."

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • OpenShot 2.3 Video Editor Released
  • OpenShot 2.3 Released With Transform & Razor Tools

    A new version of OpenShot video editor is available to download. OpenShot 2.3 adds a transform tool, improves timeline zoom, and a whole lot more.

  • Museeks Music Player Adds Native Notifications, Tray Applet, More

    It’s been nearly 6 months since we last heard from Museeks, a stylish cross-platform desktop music player.

  • 2 open source Adobe InDesign scripts

    For my job, I must use InDesign. For freelance work, I use InDesign, Scribus, GIMP, and Photoshop, depending on whether I am creating the artwork or starting with someone else's work.

    [...]

    Before I started looking for a solution to my PDF question, I had never considered using open source solutions to customize Adobe InDesign. After this exploration, I have expanded my knowledge of open source capabilities and just how valuable and useful open source solutions are, even when working in conjunction with a closed source application.

  • Telegram Voice Calls Are Coming to Desktop Linux App

    Messaging app Telegram is rolling out encrypted voice calls to its mobile apps, but has confirmed that Telegram desktop will also get the feature.

  • Does Adobe Hate Linux?

    As the press prepares to cover the release of Ubuntu 17.04, it should be clear in the tech industry just how big of a player Ubuntu is to the ecosystem. While a good bit of reviews will focus on what’s new in the release and what’s headed down the pipeline, I’d like to comment on what’s still missing and better yet, what can be done about it.

    What’s missing is a graphics suite and there’s really no excuse for not having one. Yes, we have graphics applications, but there are advantages to having a suite, not just a one-off application that can do something in 12 steps when its competitor can do it in three. The industry leader in this market is Adobe, whose Creative Cloud suite is leaps and bounds away from its competitors in terms of market share.

SQLite 3.18.0

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Software
  • SQLite Release 3.18.0 On 2017-03-30
  • SQLite 3.18 Released With PRAGMA Optimize, Other Enhancements

    SQLite 3.18 is now available as the newest feature release to this open-source embedded database library.

    A prominent addition to SQLite 3.18 is the PRAGMA optimize command. This will attempt to optimize the database and should be called prior to closing the connection to the database. In the future, they plan to add other automated maintenance tasks with this optimize command.

Wine 2.5 Release

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Software

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • This Simple App Makes it Easy to Use Emoji on Linux

    If you read around these parts with any frequency you’ll know that I love using emoji.

    Often I need to quickly find and enter emoji in a desktop app a moments notice.

    Be it a well timed cheeky grin or a totally inappropriate aubergine glyph, emoji rely on context, and in real-time conversations context changes fast.

  • Pext is an extendable Python-based tool that’s hard to explain

    I don’t like to write about things I am not confident or experienced in using. This is why don’t see listicles about Vim, op-ed’s about DevOps, and so on.

    But writing about a desktop application should be within my abilities¹ — but I’ve been finding it difficult to know how to cover an app called Pext.

  • Peering into complex, tiny structures with 3D analysis tool tomviz

    New open source software tomviz—short for tomographic visualization—enables researchers to interactively understand large 3D datasets. More specifically, the software analyzes 3D tomographic data similar to a medical CT-scan but at the nanoscale.

    "When you can take a nanoparticle or biomolecule and spin it around, slice it, look inside it, and quantitatively analyze it, you get a complete picture from all angles," says Yi Jiang, a physics Ph.D. candidate at Cornell University.

  • Avidemux 2.6.19 Open-Source Video Editor Improves HEVC and 10Bit Support, More

    The developers of the Avidemux open-source video editor software for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows operating systems announced the availability of Avidemux 2.6.19, a new maintenance update that adds various improvements.

    If you're wondering, there was no Avidemux 2.6.18 update released, and it looks like Avidemux 2.6.19 comes almost three months after the small 2.6.17 bugfix update that only allowed E-AC3 for MP4/MP4v2 streams and fixed a handful of bugs for the Preview component.

  • Steinberg brings VST to Linux, and does other good things

    The days of Linux being a barren plug-in desert may at last be over. And if you’re a developer, there are some other nice things happening to VST development on all platforms.

    Steinberg has quietly rolled out the 3.6.7 version of their plug-in SDK for Windows, Mac, iOS, and now Linux. Actually, your plug-ins may be using their SDK even if you’re unaware – because many plug-ins that appear as “AU” use a wrapper from VST to Apple’s Audio Unit. (One is included in the SDK.)

  • GNOME 3.26 Release Date Set

    The GNOME 3.26 release date is set for September 13, 2017.

    That’s the date listed in the full GNOME 3.26 release schedule, though is still subject to change (bugs don’t adhere to deadlines, after all).

    Over the coming 6 months GNOME developers will work on honing, improving and revising the hugely popular open-source desktop environment.

  • Qt Creator 4.3 Enters Beta, Integrates a QML Code Editor into Qt Quick Designer

    The Qt Company, through Eike Ziller, announced today the availability of the Beta release of the upcoming Qt Creator 4.3 open-source and cross-platform IDE (Integrated Development Environment) for Qt application developers.

    Qt Creator 4.3 promises to be a major release adding some very exciting changes, starting with the integration of a QML code editor into the Qt Quick Designer component to allow developers to use the Properties editor or the Navigator views, among many others, also for text-based editing.

Leftovers: Software and OSS

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Software
OSS
  • 10 Portable Apps Every Linux User Should Use

    Portable apps are great invention that not many people talk about. The ability to take any program to any PC, and continue using it is very handy. This is especially true for those that need to get work done, and don’t have anything with you but a flash drive.

    In this article, we’ll go over some of the best portable Linux apps to take with you. From secure internet browsing, to eBooks, graphic editing and even voice chat!

    Note: a lot of the portable apps in this article are traditional apps made portable thanks to AppImage technology. AppImage makes it possible to run an app instantly, from anywhere without the need to install. Learn more here.

  • Linux Watch Command, To Monitor a Command Activity

    Recently i came to know about watch command, from one of my friend when i have a different requirement. I got good benefit from watch command and i want to share with you people to get more benefit on it, when you have a problem on Linux system.

  • Gammu 1.38.2

    Yesterday Gammu 1.38.2 has been released. This is bugfix release fixing for example USSD or MMS decoding in some situations.

    The Windows binaries are available as well. These are built using AppVeyor and will help bring Windows users back to latest versions.

  • How a lifecycle management tool uses metrics

    Greg Sutcliffe is a long-time member and now community lead of the Foreman community. Foreman is a lifecycle management tool for physical and virtual servers. He's been studying how the real-world application of community metrics gives insight into its effectiveness and discovering the gap that exists between the ideal and the practical. He shares what insights he's found behind the numbers and how he is using them to help the community grow.

    In this interview, Sutcliffe spoke with me about the metrics they are using, how they relate to the community's goals, and which ones work best for them. He also talks about his favorite tooling and advice for other community managers looking to up their metrics game.

  • Build a private blockchain ecosystem in minutes with this open source project Join our daily free Newsletter
  • Becoming an Agile Leader, Part 5: Learning to Learn

    As an Agile leader, you learn in at least two ways: observing and measuring what happens in the organization (I have any number of posts about qualitative and quantitative measurement); and just as importantly, you learn by thinking, discussing with others, and working with others. The people in the organization learn in these ways, too.

  • Is Scratch today like the Logo of the '80s for teaching kids to code?

    Leave it to technology to take an everyday word (especially in the English language) and give it a whole new meaning. Words such as the web, viral, text, cloud, apple, java, spam, server, and tablets come to mind as great examples of how the general public's understanding of the meaning of a word can change in a relatively short amount of time.

    Hence, this article is about a turtle and a cat who have changed the lives of many people over the years, including mine.

New Emojis Come, Celtx Goes Away

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Software

Lightroom and Darktable: the verdict two years after switching

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GNU
Linux
Software

In summer 2015, I posted a detailed account of my tentative switch from Windows7 and Lightroom to Linux and Darktable. This was sparked by sudden crashes that were afflicting my system, but in a deeper sense grew from frustration with Windows and, to a lesser degree, with Lightroom.

Once I headed for Linux, I decided to plunge in fully and commit to using Ubuntu and free, open-source photo software for several months – at least until the end of that year. That would give me a chance to see whether I could actually run my photography business on the new system.

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Linux 4.12 RC3, Linux Foundation Project Updates

  • Linux 4.12-rc3
    Hey, things continue to look good, and rc3 isn't even very big. I'm hoping there's not another shoe about to drop, but so far this really feels like a nice calm release cycle, despite the size of the merge window. Knock wood. Anyway, rc3 has a little bit of everything. The biggest single change is actually just a documentation update (the intel pstate docs were converted to rst format), so the diffstat actually looks a bit odd with a wuarter just being documentation. There's also some tooling updates (perf and some bpf selftest). But if you ignore those two pieces, it looks pretty normal: two thirds of it being drivers (gpu, nvme, scsi, tty, block), with the remainder being about half networking and haf "misc" (core kernel, header files, XFS, arch updates). Go forth and test, Linus
  • Linux 4.12-rc3 Kernel Released
    Linus Torvalds has announced the third weekly test candidate for the upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel debut. Linus commented of Linux 4.12-rc3 that it isn't a very big release over the prior RCs and so far it's a "nice calm release cycle." The biggest change this past week was actually documentation updates.
  • Linus Torvalds Announced the Third Release Candidate of the Linux 4.12 Kernel
    Even if it's Memorial weekend, Linus Torvalds is on the job announcing the release and immediate availability of the third RC (Release Candidate) milestone of the upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel series.
  • Hyperledger Sawtooth Graduates to Active Status
    We’re happy to share that Hyperledger’s Technical Steering Committee (TSC) has granted the Hyperledger Sawtooth maintainer’s request to advance the project’s status from Incubation to Active. Hyperledger Iroha also graduated today.
  • Stronger Together: How Cloud Foundry Supports Other Communities
    The open source Cloud Foundry application development platform was publicly announced over six years ago, and along the way, we have connected with other projects, adopting technologies from other open source communities as they matured. For example, before Docker was a company or even a project, the Cloud Foundry platform was using Linux containers to isolate deployed applications from one another. Our container implementation wasn’t built in a general purpose way like Docker’s; it wasn’t designed to solve all of the potential use cases for a container runtime. It was designed specifically to support the stateless web applications that Cloud Foundry was initially intended to support, and to do that in a secure, multitenant fashion.

Reasons to use the GNOME 3 desktop environment, cool KDE tweaks, and GNOME integration for Qt based application

  • 11 reasons to use the GNOME 3 desktop environment for Linux
    Late last year, an upgrade to Fedora 25 caused issues with the new version of KDE Plasma that made it difficult for me to get any work done. So I decided to try other Linux desktop environments for two reasons. First, I needed to get my work done. Second, having been using KDE exclusively for many years, I thought it might be time to try some different desktops.
  • Which Linux desktop environment do you prefer?
  • 7 cool KDE tweaks that will change your life
  • Gnome integration for Qt based applications in Flatpak
    Following blog post from Patrick Griffis about new themes support in Flatpak, we started working on supporting this new feature too. Currently wherever you start a Qt application, it would always look like a KDE application or something would be missing, like icons so you would end up with bad experience and mixed feelings. This is going to change now as we now support Gnome in form of icons, widget style and Qt platform theme and with this, when you run a Qt application in Gnome, it will look definitely better and more natively than before. We packaged regular adwaita icons which are used by default in Gnome as extension of freedesktop runtime. For widget style we use adwaita-qt style, which is a Qt style attempting to look like Gtk’s adwaita and the most important part putting this all together is QGnomePlatform, a Qt platform theme which reads your Gnome configuration and applies it to running Qt applications. QGnomePlatform also enforces Qt apps to use adwaita icons and adwaita-qt style by default so that’s another reason why it is important. Both adwaita-qt and QGnomePlatform projects are by the way authored by Martin Bříza, a collegue of mine from Red Hat so if you meet him in person somewhere buy him a beer for that he cares about Qt integration in Gnome :). Now coming to a question how to install this and make it work. Basically all you need to do is install following extensions and you shold be done: