Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Software

A Glance at Simplenote and 5 Best Tools to Improve Your Typing Speed in Linux

Filed under
Software
  • Simplenote Note-Taking App Adds Focus Mode, Spellchecker, Option To Opt Out Of Analytics

    The Simplenote desktop apps were updated recently with focus mode, a spell checker, new option to opt out of analytics, and more.

    Simplenote is a note-taking application with optional Markdown support. There are applications for desktops (Linux, Windows and macOS), iOS and Android, and there's also a web client. The Simplenote applications are free and open source software, but the server is not (though there's no cost in using it to sync notes).

    Originally created by Simperium back in 2008, Simplenote is developed by Automattic, the company behind Wordpress.com, Akismet, etc., since 2013.

  • 5 Best Tools to Improve Your Typing Speed in Linux

    Not too long ago, the ability to type was a skill that set people apart. Although that is still the case, there is more competition these days since it is important to not just be able to type but to be able to type fast.

    There are several applications and websites where you can test your typing speed and learn to type faster but not all of them are created equal – thus our list of the 5 best tools that, given your dedication, will improve your typing speed.

Kraft Version 0.82

Filed under
KDE
Software

A new release of Kraft, the Qt- and KDE based software to help to organize business docs in small companies, has arrived.

A couple of days ago version 0.82 was released. It mainly is a bugfix release, but it also comes with a few new features. Users were asking for some new functions that they needed to switch to Kraft with their business communication, and I am always trying to make that a priority.

The most visible feature is a light rework of the calculation dialog that allows users to do price calculations for templates. It was cleared up, superflous elements were finally removed and the remaining ones now work as expected. The distinction between manual price and calculated price should be even more clear now. Time calculations can now not only done in the granularity of minutes, as this was to coarse for certain usecases. The unit for a time slice can now be either seconds, minutes or hours.

Read more

Proprietary: Lightworks 14.5 Released, Carnegie Mellon is Saving Old Software from Oblivion

Filed under
Software
  • Lightworks 14.5 Video Editor Released With Same-Day Linux Support But Still No Source

    Lightworks, the long-standing non-linear video editing system that has offered a native Linux build the past few years after being challenged by delays for a few years, is out today with version 14.5 and comes with Linux, macOS, and Windows support.

    Lightworks 14.5 succeeds the Lightworks 14.0 release from a year and a half ago as the latest major update for this cross-platform software owned by EditShare. This new release has user-interface improvements, variable frame-rate media support, higher GPU precision settings, Reaper export support, AC-3 audio support in various formats, support for Blackmagic RAW files, and a variety of other enhancements.

  • Carnegie Mellon is Saving Old Software from Oblivion

    In early 2010, Harvard economists Carmen Reinhart and Kenneth Rogoff published an analysis of economic data from many countries and concluded that when debt levels exceed 90 percent of gross national product, a nation’s economic growth is threatened. With debt that high, expect growth to become negative, they argued.

    This analysis was done shortly after the 2008 recession, so it had enormous relevance to policymakers, many of whom were promoting high levels of debt spending in the interest of stimulating their nations’ economies. At the same time, conservative politicians, such as Olli Rehn, then an EU commissioner, and U.S. congressman Paul Ryan, used Reinhart and Rogoff’s findings to argue for fiscal austerity.

Software: Nativefier and Linux NVENC OBS Screen Capture

Filed under
Software
  • Nativefier – Easily Make Any Website into Desktop Application

    Nativefier is a CLI tool that easily create a executable desktop application of any website with succinct and minimal configuration. Anybody can use it and it is a lot lighter than typical Electron apps.

    Nativefier is based on the electron-package and since Electron apps are platform independent, any Nativefiered app will run on GNU/Linux distros as well as on Windows and Mac Operating Systems.

  • Linux NVENC OBS Screen Capture – For The Record

    Linux NVENC OBS Screen Capture. How does it compare to a USB hardware capture device? With select NVIDIA cards and a NVIDIA modern driver for Linux, my OBS installation is able to take advantage of GPU video capturing.

8 of the Best Free Linux Comic Book Viewers (Updated 2018)

Filed under
Software

A comic book is a magazine which consists of narrative artwork in the form of sequential images with text that represent individual scenes. Panels are often accompanied by brief descriptive prose and written narrative, usually dialog contained in word balloons emblematic of the comics art form. Comics are used to tell a story, and are published in a number of different formats including comic strips, comic books, webcomics, Manga, and graphic novels. Some comics have been published in a tabloid form. The largest comic book market is Japan.

Many users associate desktop Linux with their daily repetitive grind. However, we are always on the look out for applications that help make Linux fun to use. It really is a great platform for entertainment.

Some document viewers offer a good range of different formats. Although they are not dedicated comic book viewers, Evince and okular have support for the common comic book archive files, and merit mention here.

Read more

Zulip – Most Productive Chat Application for Group or Team Chat

Filed under
Software

Zulip is an open source, powerful and easily extendable group or team chat application powered by Electron and React Native. It runs on every major operating system: Linux, Windows, MacOS; Android, iOS, and also has a web client.

It supports over 90 native integrations with external applications, under different categories including interactive bots, version control (Github, Codebase, Bitbucket etc.), communication, customer support, deployment, financial (Stripe), marketing, monitoring tools (Nagios and more), integration frameworks, productivity (Drop box, Google calender etc.) and so many others.

Read more

Stretchly – An Open-Source, Customizable Time Reminder App

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

We have covered several time apps including Chronobreak, Gnome P0modoro, and Thomas. Today’s featured timer app goes by the name of Stretchly and it is among the most customizable timer apps on the free market.

Stretchly is an open-source project that reminds its users to take breaks from working on the computer. It runs in the system tray and displays a prompt for you to take a 20-second break every 10 minutes by default.

Its app window uses a minimalist design UI with informative text, and tons of customization options including break duration, alert tones, and strict mode. Stretchly allows you to cut breaks short and return to work, enabling strict mode will disable that feature.

Read more

Sysget – A Front-end For Popular Package Managers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Are you a distro-hopper who likes to try new Linux OSs every few days? If so, I have something for you. Say hello to Sysget, a front-end for popular package managers in Unix-like operating systems. You don’t need to learn about every package managers to do basic stuffs like installing, updating, upgrading and removing packages. You just need to remember one syntax for every package manager on every Unix-like operating systems. Sysget is a wrapper script for package managers and it is written in C++.

Read more

Programs and Programming: DICOM Viwers, Turtl, Weblate, Rust and Python

Filed under
Development
Software
  • Excellent Free DICOM Viewers – Medical Imaging Software

    DICOM (an acronym for Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) is a worldwide standard in Health IT and is provided by the National Electrical Manufacturers Assocation (NEMA). It’s the standard open image format used to handle, store, print and transmit information in medical imaging. This standard specifies the way medical images and metadata like study or patient related data are stored and communicated over different digital medias.

    DICOM is a binary protocol and data format. The binary protocol specifies a set of networking protocols, the syntax and specification of commands that can be exchanged with these protocols, and a set of media storage services. It’s an entire specification of the elements required to achieve a practical level of automatic interoperability between biomedical imaging computer systems—from application layer to bit-stream encoding.

    DICOM files can be exchanged between two entities that are capable of receiving image and patient data in DICOM format.

  • Encrypted Evernote Alternative Turtl v0.7 Includes Rewritten Server, New Spaces Feature

    Turtl was updated to version 0.7 yesterday, the new release shipping with a rewritten server, among other changes. I'll cover the new version in the second part of this article, after an introduction to Turtl.

    Turtl is a "secure, encrypted Evernote alternative". The free and open source tool, which is considered beta software, can be used to take notes, save bookmarks, store documents and images, and anything else you may need, in a safe place.

    There are Turtl applications available for Linux, Windows, macOS and Android, while an iOS application should also be available in the future. Chrome and Firefox extensions are available to easily bookmark the page you're on, great for quickly saving sites for later.

    The Turtl developers offer the service (hosted server) for free, but a premium service is planned for the future. However, the Turtl server is free and open source software, so you can install and use your own instance.

  • Weblate 3.2.1

    Weblate 3.2.1 has been released today. It's a bugfix release for 3.2 fixing several minor issues which appeared in the release.

  • This Week in Rust 255
  • Code Quality & Formatting for Python

    black, the uncompromising Python code formatter, has arrived in Debian unstable and testing.

    black is being adopted by the LAVA Software Community Project in a gradual way and the new CI will be checking that files which have been formatted by black stay formatted by black in merge requests.

    There are endless ways to format Python code and pycodestyle and pylint are often too noisy to use without long lists of ignored errors and warnings.

Convert Screenshots of Equations into LaTeX Instantly With This Nifty Tool

Filed under
Software

Mathpix is a nifty little tool that allows you to take screenshots of complex mathematical equations and instantly converts it into LaTeX editable text.
Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • #RecruitmentFocus: Open source skills in high demand
    The unemployment rate in South Africa rose to 27.5% in the third quarter of 2018, while the demand for skills remains high - leaving an industry conundrum that is yet to be solved. According to SUSE, partnerships that focus on upskilling graduates and providing real-work skills, as well as placement opportunities - could be exactly what the industry in looking for.
  • Stable: not moving vs. not breaking
    There are two terms that brings a heavy controversy in the Open Source world: support and stable. Both of them have their roots in the “old days” of Open Source, where its commercial impact was low and very few companies made business with it. You probably have read a lot about maintenance vs support. This controversy is older. I first heard of it in the context of Linux based distributions. Commercial distribution had to put effort in differentiating among the two because in Open SOurce they were used indistictly but not in business. But this post is about the adjectivet stable…
  • Cameron Kaiser: A thank you to Ginn Chen, whom Larry Ellison screwed
    Periodically I refresh my machines by dusting them off and plugging them in and running them for a while to keep the disks spinnin' and the caps chargin'. Today was the day to refurbish my Sun Ultra-3, the only laptop Sun ever "made" (they actually rebadged the SPARCle and later the crotchburner 1.2GHz Tadpole Viper, which is the one I have). Since its last refresh the IDPROM had died, as they do when they run out of battery, resetting the MAC address to zeroes and erasing the license for the 802.11b which I never used anyway. But, after fixing the clock to prevent GNOME from puking on the abnormal date, it booted and I figured I'd update Firefox since it still had 38.4 on it. Ginn Chen, first at Sun and later at Oracle, regularly issued builds of Firefox which ran very nicely on SPARC Solaris 10. Near as I can determine, Oracle has never offered a build of any Firefox post-Rust even to the paying customers they're bleeding dry, but I figured I should be able to find the last ESR of 52 and install that. (Amusingly this relic can run a Firefox in some respects more current than TenFourFox, which is an evolved and patched Firefox 45.)
  • Protecting the world’s oceans with open data science
    For environmental scientists, researching a single ecosystem or organism can be a daunting task. The amount of data and literature to comb through (or create) is often overwhelming. So how, then, can environmental scientists approach studying the health of the world’s oceans? What ocean health means is a big question in itself—oceans span millions of square miles, are home to countless species, and border hundreds of countries and territories, each of which has its own unique marine policies and practices. But no matter how daunting this task may seem, it’s a necessary and vital one. So in 2012, the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) and Conservation International publicly launched the Ocean Health Index (OHI), an ambitious initiative to measure the benefits that oceans provide to people, including clean water, coastal protections, and biodiversity. The idea was to create an annual assessment to document major oceanic changes and trends, and in turn, use those findings to craft better marine policy around the world.

Openwashing Leftovers

The Last Independent Mobile OS

The year was 2010 and the future of mobile computing was looking bright. The iPhone was barely three years old, Google’s Android had yet to swallow the smartphone market whole, and half a dozen alternative mobile operating systems—many of which were devoutly open source—were preparing for launch. Eight years on, you probably haven’t even heard of most of these alternative mobile operating systems, much less use them. Today, Android and iOS dominate the global smartphone market and account for 99.9 percent of mobile operating systems. Even Microsoft and Blackberry, longtime players in the mobile space with massive revenue streams, have all but left the space. Then there’s Jolla, the small Finnish tech company behind Sailfish OS, which it bills as the “last independent alternative mobile operating system.” Jolla has had to walk itself back from the edge of destruction several times over the course of its seven year existence, and each time it has emerged battered, but more determined than ever to carve out a spot in the world for a truly independent, open source mobile operating system. After years of failed product launches, lackluster user growth, and supply chain fiascoes, it’s only been in the last few months that things finally seem to be turning to Jolla’s favor. Over the past two years the company has rode the wave of anti-Google sentiment outside the US and inked deals with large foreign companies that want to turn Sailfish into a household name. Despite the recent success, Jolla is far from being a major player in the mobile market. And yet it also still exists, which is more than can be said of every other would-be alternative mobile OS company. Read more