Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Software

Tizen Apps

Filed under
OS
Linux
Software
  • Smartphone App: Walkie Talkie app added to Tizen Store

    Last week, we have had a new Walkie Talkie app added to the Tizen Store, something a little different and a little fun, created by developer SomyaC. A walkie-talkie (more formally known as a Handheld Transceiver, or HT) is a hand- held, portable, two-way radio transceiver that lets you communicate directly between both handsets.

  • Smartphone App: Speed Test for Samsung Z1, Z2, Z3 is available in Tizen Store

    Do you know what is your internet speed on your Tizen smartphone? Do you know your internet connection download or upload speed? Anything about ping? Have you never test it? No problem! Developer Srabani S S Patra added a new app last week named Speed Test.

Wine Staging Release 2.1

Filed under
Software
  • Release 2.1

    The main change of this release is the reworked CSMT (Command Stream Multithreading) patchset. As many Wine Staging users will already know, the idea of CSMT is to move the execution of OpenGL commands to a separate thread, and to use available CPU and GPU resources more efficiently. In the new version the existing code has been cleaned up and various hacks have been removed. The result of this work is that all D3D related tests pass again. We also tested some D3D11 games which were previously broken with CSMT enabled and they started working. If you encountered bugs when using the CSMT, it might be a good time to retest them with the new release.

  • Wine-Staging 2.1 Reworks CSMT For D3D10/D3D11

    Riding off last week's Wine 2.1 release as the first post-2.0 bi-weekly development snapshot, Wine-Staging 2.1 has been released that continues to incorporate all of its various experimental/testing patches.

  • Wine-Staging 2.1 release with CSMT support for DirectX 10 & 11

    Wine-Staging has a big new update which brings in their CSMT (Command Stream Multithreading) support for DirectX 10 & 11. See their news here for the full details.

    CSMT should enable games run in Wine to run better and closer to the level found in Windows directly. They do note, that right now their focus was on getting it working and it doesn't have some of the performance changes from the earlier version of CSMT.

KDE and New Software

Filed under
KDE
Software
  • Finally, a Linux laptop worthy of KDE

    These are Macbook Air-like machines that are (as the name would imply) slim, light, and modern. The weight of Slimbook with an installed 120GB SSD, and 4GB of RAM, comes in at 1.39 kg (3.06 pounds). Considering my Chromebook Pixel 2 weighs in at 3.4 pounds, I would happily accept that encumbrance.

  • KDE Plasma 5.9.1 – Here is the First Bugfix Release

    Today, the Kde team announced the first minor release for Kde Plasma 5.9 including various little but important bugfixes and translation updates. Certainly, this first small bugfix release will improve the stability and usability of the desktop environment.

  • Desktop Dimmer – an Open-Source Screen Dimmer App

    If you regularly work in a dark room, and find your dimmed screen is still too bright, you may want to this open-source screen dimmer app a try.

  • Kupfer Quick Launcher Ported To Python 3 And GTK 3, Sees New Release After 4 And A Half Years [PPA]

    After around 4 and a half years of inactivity, a new Kupfer (quick launcher) version was released 3 days ago, followed by 3 more releases since then.

    The application has a new developer who ported the application to Python 3, GTK 3 and GObject Introspection, while also fixing various bugs.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Awesome vim plugins for writers

    Vim is one of the most popular text editors among programmers, web developers, and power users of GNU/Linux. This is not surprising, because Vim offers high-speed editing, has extensibility, and is pre-installed on most Linux-based distributions.

    In addition, Vim offers great benefits to writers, regardless of whether they are technically minded or not. I personally use it not only for editing configuration files and web pages, but for writing blogs, software documentation, notes, and presentation slides. In my opinion, the only potential issue it has might be its relatively steep learning curve. I remember that it took me about two weeks to become comfortable working in it, but since then, editing any kind of text has felt noticeably more fluent compared to other editors I used before.

  • FFmpeg 3.2.3 "Hypatia" Open-Source Multimedia Framework Released with 35 Fixes

    The major FFmpeg 3.2 "Hypatia" open-source multimedia framework recently received its third maintenance release, versioned 3.2.3, which brings up-to-date components and a bunch of various improvements.

    FFmpeg 3.2.3 was released on February 6, 2017, and comes exactly two months after the previous point release, namely FFmpeg 3.2.2, announced on December 5, 2016. It is now considered the latest stable FFmpeg release from the 3.2 "Hypatia" series, which was officially unveiled on October 26, 2016.

  • Video: LCA 2017 - Package Managers All the Way Down

    Anyone who has been using Linux for a while is familiar with package managers and package management. Being a Fedora user, I have noticed a few projects that Fedora has in the works to augment package management. For example, Fedora Atomic does not the traditional package manager (dnf) but uses rpm-ostree instead. Why would Fedora be working on additional packaging systems? What is wrong with existing package managers? I have been asking myself those questions for some time now.

  • Vivaldi 1.7 Web Browser Is Out with Built-In Screenshot Tool, New History Panel

    Today, February 8, 2017, Vivaldi Technologies have had the great pleasure of announcing the general availability of the Vivaldi 1.7 web browser for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows operating systems.

    Vivaldi 1.7 comes two months after the release of version 1.6, which launched on December 15, 2016, as the world's first web browser to display notifications in tabs for web pages that offer content in real time, such as Facebook and Twitter, and promises to introduce various new features that we bet many of you will love. First off, you should know that Vivaldi 1.7 is based on the open-source Chromium 56.0.2924.88 browser.

Leftovers: Software and HowTos

Filed under
Software
HowTos

CrossOver 16.1.0 and DiRT Rally

Filed under
Software
Gaming

Software and today's howtos

Filed under
Software
HowTos
  • View 360 Panorama Photos on Ubuntu with this Image Viewer Plugin
  • AV1 Is Making Progress As A Royalty-Free Video Codec Based Off VP9

    The Alliance for Open Media continues working hard on their first video codec, dubbed AV1, that started off with the VP9 libvpx code-base and are pursuing to do for free video codecs what the Opus codec has done for audio.

    AV1 strives to be a viable open, royalty-free video codec suitable for Internet video and developed by Alliance for Open Media. AV1 is still hoping to succeed VP9 and be a viable contender to HEVC/H.265, but not until later in 2017 is the bitstream format expected to be finalized and thus not until 2018 when we may begin seeing some AV1 adoption.

  • Vivaldi 1.7 Browser Gets a Release Candidate, Now Based on Chromium 56.0.2924.88

    Softpedia was informed by Vivaldi's Ruarí Ødegaard about the availability of the first Release Candidate (RC) build of the upcoming Vivaldi 1.7 web browser, dubbed as Vivaldi Snapshot 1.7.735.36.

    By our count, Vivaldi Snapshot 1.7.735.36 is the eighth released for the Vivaldi 1.7 development cycle. This is small release that rebases the web browser to Chromium 56.0.2924.88, updates various language translations, fixes a handful of regressions from previous versions, and improves the new History panel.

  • Will Skype’s Linux App Stop Working on March 1?
  • You Can Now Install Various KDE Apps from the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Snappy Store

    In December last year, we reported on the work done by KDE Community developer Harald Sitter to bundle the official KDE applications as Snaps and make them available for installation on the Ubuntu Snappy Store.

    A Snap build of the latest KDE Frameworks 5, a collection of add-on libraries for Qt 5, made its way into the Snappy Store, and can be easily installed on the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system if you execute the "sudo snap install kde-frameworks-5" command in a terminal emulator.

  • LibreOffice 5.3 Upgrade Brings Open-Source Office Suite to the Cloud

    The open-source LibreOffice office application suite has been improving steadily since 2010, when it was forked from the Oracle OpenOffice suite. The latest incremental milestone is LibreOffice version 5.3, released Feb. 1 and providing users with new features and improved performance. LibreOffice bundles multiple applications including the Writer Document, Calc Spreadsheet, Impress Presentation, Draw, Math Formula and Base Database. Among the numerous feature updates in Writer are new PDF document-handling capabilities that enable users to import and digitally sign existing documents. Writer also benefits from new table formatting capabilities and an easier-to-use side menu for page options. LibreOffice typically is available as the default office suite in many Linux distributions and freely available for Apple Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows applications. Plus, with LibreOffice 5.3, the whole office suite also can be deployed in the cloud. In this slide show, eWEEK takes a look at key features of LibreOffice 5.3.

  • Glibc 2.25 Now Available With getrandom(), Better Stack Smashing Protection

    New features to glibc 2.25 include getentropy() and getrandom() functions, several other new functions, new math.h features, support for OpenBSD's explicit_bzero, most of glibc can now built with the stack smashing protector enabled, expanded coverage of GDB pretty printers, some new tunables, and a range of other work.

  • [Old] vc-dwim-1.8 released [stable]
  • [Old] GNU Screen v.4.5.0
  • A Makefile for your Go project

    My most loathed feature of Go is the mandatory use of GOPATH: I do not want to put my own code next to its dependencies. Hopefully, this issue is slowly starting to be accepted by the main authors. In the meantime, you can workaround this problem with more opinionated tools (like gb) or by crafting your own Makefile.

  • nanotime 0.1.1
  • RcppCCTZ 0.2.1
  • IPv6 and OpenVPN on Linode Debian/Ubuntu VPS
  • How To Install The Java Runtime And Development Kit On Ubuntu
  • How To Enable Subtitles On Kodi 17 Krypton With Estuary Skin

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • `MyPaint` An Advanced Alternative To MS Paint for Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    MyPaint is a free, open source, simple drawing and painting program for digital painters. It is way better and advanced than MS Windows paint, well the truth is you can't compare this great program with MS Paint. It lets you focus on the art instead of the program. You work on your canvas with minimum distractions, bringing up the interface only when you need it. MyPaint started in 2004 by Martin Renold, he wanted a smooth paint program which could help him digital painting with brush in different way to pressure and speed. MyPaint supports many graphics tablets such as Wacom, and many similar devices. The brush engine of MyPaint is versatile and configurable, and it offers useful, productive tools which a digital painter can expect from a program.

  • Calibre eBook Library and Editor and Library Now Support Latest Kobo Device

    Calibre is an eBook management software that is almost without equal, on any platform that runs it. A few years ago nobody could anticipate that eBooks will take our lives completely, but the rise of eBook readers and the fact that most books are cheaper in digital form, proves that it was inevitable for someone to take matters in his own hands and develop something that can actually manage an entire library.

  • Package managers all the way down

    Package managers are at the core of Linux distributions, but they are currently engulfed in a wave of changes and it's not clear how things will end up. Kristoffer Grönlund started his 2017 linux.conf.au talk on the subject by putting up a slide saying that "everything is terrible awesome". There are a number of frustrations that result from the current state of package management, but that frustration may well lead to better things in the future.

    Grönlund started by asking a simple question: what is a package manager? There are, in fact, two types of package managers out there, and the intersection between them is leading to some interesting problems.

    When most people think of package managers, they are thinking of a distribution package manager like zypper, DNF, or APT. These tools date back to the early days of Linux, when there were few boundaries between users, developers, and administrators; whoever we were, we had to do everything ourselves. Distribution package managers were construction kits that helped us to put our distributions together. They managed dependencies — both build and runtime dependencies, which are different things. They helped users install their software, administrators to keep systems up to date, and distributors to manage licenses.

  • Open Source Photography Software "Darktable" 2.2.2 has been Released

    Darktable is an open source photography workflow application and RAW developer. A virtual lighttable and darkroom for photographers. It manages your digital negatives in a database, lets you view them through a zoomable lighttable and enables you to develop raw images and enhance them.

  • 6 Cool Internet Radio Players For Linux

    There are quite a few Linux applications that can play Internet radio, but I thought I'd make a list of some of the most interesting apps that focus on this.

    The list includes lightweight Internet radio players, a fully fledged desktop application, a command line radio browser and player, as well as a GNOME Shell extension.

  • RcloneBrowser (Rclone GUI) Lets You Manage Multiple Cloud Storage Services From A Single Desktop App

    In case you're not familiar with Rclone, this is a command line tool for synchronizing files from or to cloud storage services, which supports Google Drive, Google Cloud Storage, Dropbox, Microsoft One Drive, Amazon S3, Amazon Drive, Openstack Swift / Rackspace cloud files / Memset Memstore, Hubic, Yandex Disk, and Backblaze B2.

    Rclone can synchronize files either directly between these cloud services, or to / from your local filesystem.

  • 10 Best Linux Task Managers

    One of the most important things for Linux users is the task management, because all operating systems have mistakes, and Linux isn’t the exception yet. Sometimes, I have troubles with specific applications that collapse and the processes do not stop, it’s very weird, but sometimes it happens. So I use Linux task manager, find the process and finally, I kill it.

  • RPushbullet 0.3.0

    A major new update of the RPushbullet package is now on CRAN. RPushbullet interfacing the neat Pushbullet service for inter-device messaging, communication, and more. It lets you easily send alerts like the one to the to your browser, phone, tablet, ... -- or all at once.

  • Release Notes for fish 2.5.0 (released February 3, 2017)

    Starting with version 2.5, fish requires a more up-to-date version of C++, specifically C++11 (from 2011). This affects some older platforms:

  • GIMP 2.8.20 Release

    We are releasing GIMP 2.8.20 with various bug fixes—the most noticeable one being changes to the weird initial user interface language selection on macOS to make it use the user’s preferred language.

  • GNOME's Epiphany Web Browser Lands A Lot More 3.24 Feature Work

    Developers working on GNOME's Web Browser, Epiphany, have prepared the v3.23.5 release as their latest development version in the road towards GNOME 3.24.

Wine 2.1 Development Release

Filed under
Software

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • oVirt 4.1 Released With Many New Features

    The oVirt project has announced their major v4.1 release with a lot of new functionality. The oVirt project is an alternative to VMWare's vSphere for open-source virtualization management.

  • Vivaldi 1.7 Web Browser to Hit the Streets Soon with Brand-New History Panel

    Vivaldi's Ruarí Ødegaard is informing Softpedia today about the availability of a new snapshot of the upcoming Vivaldi 1.7 web browser, due for release sometime next week.

    Earlier this week we reported that Vivaldi 1.7 is just around the corner and will let you share things more efficiently thanks to a new functionality added to the built-in screenshot tool that allows insertion of certain areas of a web page on the web browser's Notes feature. And now, Vivaldi Snapshot 1.7.735.29 is here to introduce a brand-new history panel.

  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 30

    This is our first post in 2017 and looks like we must start apologizing. In our previous post we promised news about this blog, but the administrative part slowed us down and the surprise is still not ready. On the bright side, we have quite some news about YaST. So let’s go for it!

  • Snapcraft 2.26 Released For Ubuntu Snappy Packages

    For developers packaging their software in Snaps for Ubuntu and other supported operating systems, Snapcraft 2.26 is now available.

  • How to Global Menu in Plasma 5.9

    Today Plasma 5.9.0 became available in KDE neon User Edition. With it comes the return of global menus along with other awesome sauce features.

    To enable global menus open System Settings, go into the Application Style category, and in the Widget Style settings you will find a tab called Fine Tuning. On this tab you can find the new Menubar options. You can change to either a Title Bar Button, which will tuck the menu into a tiny button into the window decoration bar at the top, or the Application Menu widget, allowing the associated Plasma panel to supply the menu in a fixed location.

  • Google Chrome 57 Enters Beta

    Fresh off last week's release of Chrome 56 with WebGL 2.0 by default, FLAC audio support, and more, is now the Chrome 57 beta.

  • After a Long Wait, Chrome for iOS Goes Open Source
  • The Weather Outside Is Frightful (Or Is It?)
  • How to Install LibreOffice 5.3 on Ubuntu (With One Command)
  • What’s New in LibreOffice 5.3

    Open source’s premiere office suite keeps getting better with each new release. Here’s a look at some of the new features in LibreOffice 5.3.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Why You Should Consider Open Sourcing Your Software
    Free & Open source software have grown so rapidly in the last few years. Just compare the situation of being ignored and considered like a nerds-movement in the early 2000’s to the situation today in 2017. We surly made a huge advancement so far. Thanks to the amazing ecosystem of open source which links both communities and enterprises together. However, when it comes to individuals, a lot of people are hesitant when it comes to open-sourcing their software. They think that the “secret” behind it will be stolen. They think that they will be releasing their work “for nothing in return” when they do so. That’s definitely false.
  • Caspia Projects and Thunderbird – Open Source In Absentia
    What does this have to do with Thunderbird? I sat in a room a few weeks ago with 10 guys at Clallam Bay, all who have been in a full-time, intensive software training program for about a year, who are really interested in trying to do real-world projects rather than simply hidden internal projects that are classroom assignments, or personal projects with no public outlet. I start in April spending two days per week with these guys. Then there are another 10 or so guys at WSR in Monroe that started last month, though the situation there is more complex. The situation is similar to other groups of students that might be able to work on Thunderbird or Mozilla projects, with these differences:1) Student or GSOC projects tend to have a duration of a few months, while the expected commitment time for this group is much longer.
  • Make Dragonfly BSD great again!
    Recently I spent some time reading Dragonfly BSD code. While doing so I spotted a vulnerability in the sysvsem subsystem that let user to point to any piece of memory and write data through it (including the kernel space). This can be turned into execution of arbitrary code in the kernel context and by exploiting this, we're gonna make Dragonfly BSD great again!

Desktop GNU/Linux

  • [Video] Litebook Alpha Review! | Unboxing, Apps, and Gaming!
  • Beginners Guide To Linux
    Curious about getting into Raspberry Pi or just Linux in general but you're not sure where to start? This post is for you. It's not intended to be a comprehensive guide, rather a gentle intro into the Linux world. I'm not a Linux expert, but I know from experience that it can be an intimidating platform to get started in. I want this post to show you what you need to know to get started with Linux.
  • [Video] 5 Reasons To Switch To Linux
  • System76 Provides Wireless Fixes for Ubiquity
    We are proud to have contributed to Ubiquity in such a way that we feel improves all users’ lives when using Ubuntu. We will continue improving the platform and hope that our users will see value in what we do.
  • GNOME 3.24 Released, See What`s New
    After being in development for six months, GNOME 3.24 was released today, bringing improvements such as Night Light, weather information in the date / time indicator, along with updates to its applications, and more.

Late Night Linux, Bad Voltage, and Effective Communication in Podcasting

  • Late Night Linux – Episode 06
    Jesse is back but this time Félim is in his sick bed so it’s a 3 man show yet again. Some heated debates about Nextcloud’s actions, Ubuntu extended support and PowerPC distros, followed by a deep dive into the world of HiDPI 4k support in Linux.
  • Bad Voltage Live at SCaLE 15x
    The Bad Voltage live stage show, from SCaLE 15x in Pasadena, March 2017!
  • Effective Communication in Podcasting
    When I got serious about doing Linux videos on YouTube, I drew on all of that Old Media experience plus I took a few classes to make sure I knew what I was talking about before handing out advice to others. That has led to the EzeeLinux project. The goal of EzeeLinux is to educate folks about Linux and get them started on the right path to success… I have been truly humbled by the response it has gotten. That said, I don’t feel like I’m competing with anyone – the more, the merrier! I honestly feel that Linux and Open Source Software are arguably one of the few truly good things happening in the world today. It brings people from all over the world together and provides a means to get cutting edge technology into the hands of anyone, anywhere who wants to take the time to learn how to use it regardless of their financial situation. That is the kind of power that can quite literally change the world, folks. No one should be left behind in this Information Age. Come to think of it, Ed Murrow would probably do a documentary about Linux if he was still around today… It would be right up his street, I think. It’s the kind of thing he liked to talk about.

Leftovers: Software

  • [Video] Linux Audio Programs Compared 2017
    I made this video for those that are new to, or just interested in making music on the Linux OS. I go over the features, goods and bads of Rosegarden, LMMS, Ardour, Mixbus, and EnergyXT, as well as touch on Qtractor. I don't don't go much into details of the particular versions I am using, but the video was made in the early part of 2017 and I'm running Ubuntu 16.04LTS.
  • Green Recorder: A Simple Desktop/Screen Recorder for Linux
    Green Recorder is a simple, open source desktop recorder developed for Linux systems built using Python, GTK and FFmpeg. It supports most of the Linux desktop environments such as Unity, Gnome, Cinnamon, Mate, Xfce and so on. Recently it has been updated to work with Wayland too in Gnome session.
  • Komorebi: A New Way To Enhance Your Desktop Using Animated/Parallax Wallpapers
    In past there were applications that allowed us to run videos/Gif as wallpaper on the desktop and make desktop look much cooler but than all of sudden the development of such Apps stopped and I can't name any App that exist for this purpose. Komorebi is fairly new application designed to make your desktop experience much better and make desktop cool as well, we can say it is kind of 'live wallpaper' situation here or 3D wallpaper. It is developed by Abe Masri and available under GPL license for free.
  • Stacer Sytem Optimizer: A Must Have Application For Ubuntu/Linux Mint
    There are multiple ways to optimize your Linux, the most geeky way is using Terminal, there are also applications available that performs such actions like Bleachbit, Ubuntu cleaner and so on. Stacer is simple, open-source, quick and new application designed to offer you all-in-one optimizer for your Ubuntu/Linux Mint (It's alternative to CCleaner but only for Linux).
  • Qtox: Open Source and Fully Secure Skype Replacement for Linux
    Long years ago, we've talked about a Skype alternative called Tox which was still in its early developmental stages. Tox was supposed to become the anti-thesis of Skype by being a fully open-source video and voice chat client that placed user privacy and security at its center. Well, guess what, there are now fully active and well-maintained chat clients that are built on top of Tox protocol. qTox is one of them.
  • Rclone 1.36 Released With SFTP And Local Symlinks Support, More
    Rclone 1.36 was released recently, bringing support for SFTP, local symbolic links support, mount improvements, along with many other new features and bug fixes. For those not familiar with Rclone, this is a cross-platform command line tool for synchronizing files and folders to multiple cloud storages, which supports Dropbox, Google Drive, Amazon S3, Amazon Drive, Microsoft One Drive, Yandex Disk, and more. It can be used to sync files either from your machine or from one cloud storage to another.
  • Streamlink Twitch GUI 1.2.0 Adds Support For Communities And Team Pages, Basic Hotkeys
    Streamlink Twitch GUI (previously Livestreamer Twitch GUI) is a multi-platform Twitch.tv browser. The application is powered by Node.js, Chromium and Streamlink, though it can still use Livestreamer (which is no longer maintained) too.
  • Code Editor `Brackets` 1.9 Released, Available In PPA
    Brackets is a free, open source code editor focused on front-end web development (HTML, CSS and JavaScript).
  • Terminix Terminal Emulator Renamed To Tilix, Sees New Bugfix Release
    [Quick update] Terminix, a GTK3 tiling terminal emulator, has been renamed to Tilix due to some trademark issues.