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Open-Source Speech Recognition Platform – Simon Unveiled

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Software An open-source speech recognition platform called ‘Simon’ has been developed under the General Public License (GPL), in order to serve people with locomotor and cognitive dysfunctions with an advanced speech recognition system (SRC).

Packaging standards, again

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Software I don’t understand why this debate won’t go away and die already, because it’s fundamentally silly, as anyone who’s actually bothered doing any packaging knows. Why don’t we have a common packaging format? Because we don’t have a common distribution.

Open Source You Can Use, May 2009 Edition

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Software Sound, video, distros and programming all figure into this month's roundup of open source goodies.

Look out IE, Firefox, Chrome is getting much better

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blogs.computerworld: I love Google Chrome. It's faster than fast and I really like the clean, but still helpful, interface.

Beryl back from the ashes

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Software Wake up all at Compiz as Beryl is alive and kicking !Wake up all at Compiz as Beryl is alive and kicking !

How LGP came to be

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blog.linuxgamepublishing: Back in the day, 1999, around august time to be exact, I had been a beta tester on Loki’s Civilisation: Call to Power, but I couldn’t easily buy a copy from anywhere in the UK. Someone in the office said to me ‘hey, why don’t you start up a company in England then, selling games for Linux.

5 Great GTD Applications for Linux

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Software There is a popular joke about Linux users that we are so busy tweaking our system to do things for fun that we don’t have time to do important stuff. Hopefully you will find some of these apps helpful.

Finally, A Creative X-Fi Driver Going Into ALSA

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Software Support for the Creative X-Fi sound cards on Linux has been a mess to say the least. The good news is that as of today there is a merge-able version of the Creative X-Fi driver for ALSA.

PackageKit in Fedora 11

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Software When PackageKit was first introduced to the masses, it was meant to smooth out the experience of someone using the free desktop. In Fedora 11, fonts and some content types are also automatically handled for users.

Stop the presses: Poulsbo on Fedora 10 - working

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Software yes! I have psb up on Fedora 10. I just had it driving the P’s internal panel at 1600×768 and my 20″ monitor at 1680×1050 - side-by-side. which is actually pretty impressive. It has a decent RandR implementation.

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