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Software

I hate Skype. So Should You.

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Software

gnuru.org: Skype is a predatory virus that should be banned from your computer. But don't take my word for it. Look at the facts.

Linux an equal Flash player

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Software

desktoplinux.com: Once upon a time, desktop Linux was a second-class citizen, where Flash was concerned. Welcome to the future. Linux is now a first-class desktop operating system citizen.

MythTV, Rainy Day Project With Staying Power

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Software

ostatic.com: My MythTV box has been humming in my living room just shy of a year. It's not a project for a new user, but it's a better application, and less complicated to install and maintain than you've been led to believe.

Flock 2.0 Has Arrived

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Software

webpronews.com: Flock, the social Web browser built on Mozilla Firefox is now out. Social networking users can have access to MySpace, Facebook, Digg, YouTube, Flickr, Picasa, Photobucket and Twitter via Flock's sidebar.

Xfce 4.6 BETA-1 ('Fuzzy') released

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Software

We are one month since the release of Xfce 4.6 ALPHA. And now it's time to release the first BETA, codename 'Fuzzy'. A lot of bugs have been fixed in this release.

RPM Fusion enters testing state

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Software

liquidat.wordpress: RPM Fusion, a merge of several former Fedora 3rd party repositories providing licence/patent problematic packages, has entered the public testing state. Fedora Rawhide users can now start using it, and the brave among the Fedora 9 and Fedora 8 users can also help testing.

Adobe ships Flash Player 10

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Software

computerworld.com: Adobe Systems Inc. began shipping its Adobe Flash Player 10 browser plug-in Wednesday with new features aimed at helping designers and developers build interactive content and online videos.

On GNOME: Gruber’s Wrong, But That Doesn’t Make Me Right

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Software

redmonk.com/sogrady: Just last week, I mentioned that when it came to Apple, there was no one whose commentary I respected more than John Gruber’s. Ironic, then, as he made his commentary on everything else invisible to me the very next week. Sad, too.

Microsoft cleared to commit code to Apache

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Software

cnet.com: Few will have noticed, but Microsoft's Jim Kellerman just announced that he and a Microsoft colleague "been cleared to contribute patches again" to Apache, and specifically to the Hadoop project.

Krusader: one file manager to rule them all

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Software

freesoftwaremagazine.com: I don’t like KDE4. I don’t like the Dolphin file manager either. But those dislikes are proportional to my concern about the future of Konqueror. Then, I discovered Krusader.

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