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Software

Make Your Linux Desktop More Productive

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Linux
Software

debaira.blogspot: Apple has convinced millions that they can make the switch from Windows to OS X, but those curious about Linux have to see for themselves if they can work or play on a free desktop. The short answer is that, for most halfway tech-savvy people who aren't hardcore gamers, yes, you can.

The Great Mixer Debate (or, Where Did All My Sliders Go?)

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Software

happyassassin.net: Those of you - you poor, poor people - who read the Fedora development mailing list - were treated this week to a flamefest regarding the change to the official GNOME audio volume control applications which will appear in Fedora 11.

Get a handy multi-item clipboard with Glipper

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Software

blogs.techrepublic.com: One thing I really enjoy about OS X are a number of clipboard managers that allow you to retain a clipboard history of multiple items with easy access and navigation. Productivity tools like this also exist for some Linux desktop managers.

5 Ways Xoopit Extends Gmail

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Software

I’m a huge fan of Gmail. I’ve been using it for years, and have converted several small businesses over to Google Apps so they can take advantage of it. I find it fast and flexible, and can get to my seven years worth of email from any computer on the planet.

For the last few weeks I’ve been extending Gmail’s functionality with a Firefox extension called “Xoopit for Gmail“. Xoopit makes Gmail more social, and gives flexible access to attachments others have sent me.

Group test: project planners

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Software

tuxradar.com: If you were suffering in silence because you thought you couldn't draw a Gantt chart or an RBS diagram on Linux, you were wrong. In this article we'll present five project managers that are aimed at non-geek desktop users.

K3b 2.0 Alpha Preview - First KDE4 Port

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Software

tuxarena.blogspot: I was pleased to hear a while ago that K3b got two new developers assigned by the Mandriva project and that work at the KDE4 port is going well now.

Sharpening the Intel Driver Focus

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Software

keithp.com: This week, we finished up our 2009 Q1 release of the Intel driver. Most of the effort for this quarter has been to stabilize the recent work, focusing on serious bugs and testing as many combinations as we could manage.

3 Moonlight Questions

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Software

meandubuntu.wordpress: I got into a discussion on IRC the other day with a mono supporter. One of the things that came up on a tangent was Moonlight, Novell’s implementation of Microsoft’s weapon-of-hope against Adobe’s Flash.

Cover Art & Lyrics Widget for your desktop

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Software
HowTos

d0od.blogspot: Display album art (and lyrics!) for your playing tracks right on your desktop! Installation is simple, and I'll guide you through making a launcher for it too!

Opera and Open Source, Insight Into The ‘Turbo’ Technology

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Software

tuxgeek.me: In this article we get to discuss Opera’s role as an innovator in the browser market as well as find out if Opera will release its code under the GPL and some technical bits about the ‘Turbo’ technology.

Also: New snapshot with automated crash reporting

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The subtle art of the Desktop

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