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Software

Is ndiswrapper Dead?

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Software

workswithu.com: For a long time, ndiswrapper, which uses Windows wireless drivers to make wireless cards work on Linux, was a vitally important component of many Ubuntu systems. In many cases, it was the only way for users to access wireless Internet. Unfortunately, the ndiswrapper project’s pulse has seemed to go from faint to non-existent over the last several months.

Text Web Browsers in Linux

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Software

linuxtuts.blogspot: These are the text webbrowsers in linux. That means you can search web or surf the net using these. You can also view html from console using these text browsers.

The Window Manager Dilemma

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Software

raiden.net: One of the thing's that's been picking at my brains lately is the mess surrounding KDE4. I'm here instead to attack this issue from another angle. That angle is the dilemma we have with the wide array of existing Linux (and BSD) window managers.

Cool Linux Projects that Need More Publicity

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Software

internetling.com: Always when a type of application is missing, there is bound to be a version in development. In order to attract some interest for certain slow, but extremely important projects I’ve picked out a few attractive apps which could become powerful contributors to the widespread adoption of the Linux desktop.

The Annual Christmas Online Games Speedlink Post

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Software
Web

penguinpetes.com: Just when you were all wondering if I'd abandoned the dang blog, I'll carry on my Christmas tradition of posting a list of online games and toys that I found interesting this year. Because at least I got Christmas off work!

The 10 Coolest Open Source Products Of 2008

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Software

crn.com: Open Source Software is about more than just the Linux operating system. Here's a look at the coolest open source products to come across the transom in 2008.

Watch Out - Great Looking Ubuntu Intrepid Apps

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Software

openmode.ca: When you install a fresh new version of Ubuntu on your machine, is there a time when you find yourself scrolling through the entire list of all available applications to install? Hoping to find something new that may make using your Linux system that much more easier, productive, or fun to use?

Replacing your Windows/Mac apps on Linux

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Software

jgadgets.com: Switching operating systems can be tough. When you get accustomed to certain applications sometimes it can be hard to learn how to use other ones. Here’s a quick guide so you can make your Linux machine feel like home.

Wink - Tutorial and Presentation creation software

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Software

dedoimedo.com: Today, we'll learn how to create impressive, captivating animated screencast-like presentations that will help you deliver your ideas in a unique, highly professional manner.

AIR on Linux test run

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Software

computerworld.com: AIR (Adobe Integrated Runtime) is a cross-operating system runtime that lets you use rich Internet applications that combine HTML, Ajax, Adobe Flash, and Adobe Flex technologies. What that means to you and me is that it's lets us run another kind of application on our Internet-connected Windows PCs, Macs, and just this month, Linux desktop computers.

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World’s smallest i.MX6 module has onboard WiFi, eMMC

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BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition review

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