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Software

12 Popular Audio Players for Linux - An Overview

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tuxarena.blogspot: Next is an overview of the best audio players available in Linux. I will only review the GUI players, leaving tools like mp3blaster, mpg123 or ogg123 for some other time. To begin with...

GNOME 3.0 needs a big, visible change

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zdnet.com.au: After first being discussed at the GUADEC conference back in July last year, the GNOME project is moving forward on its plans for GNOME 3.0, with a new user interface planned.

VLC 0.9.9: The best media player just got better

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news.cnet.com: If you've ever struggled to play a file you downloaded from the hinterlands of the Web, you clearly didn't try opening it with VideoLan's VLC media player, a free, hugely popular, and open-source media player.

!Rant: Desktop Effects? Hell, yeah!

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trolltech.com/blogs: Last year I wrote a rather strong blog when I was frustrated, titled Desktop Effects? Never more. I officially apologise for my words and retract all I said. I have been running desktop effects for months now, without a hitch.

Compiz is an evil dying hack

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linux-wizard.net: Often I said that Compiz was an evil hack as it was replacing the native and eventually well tested desktop windowmanager with a new code unstested and unstable. Now Compiz is at an important point of its life, and some decisions may make it become irrelevant in the future.

Compiz 0.9.x - Where are we now, and where to from here

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smspillaz.wordpress: Compiz 0.9.x started in december when onestone announced his core rewrite on the mailing list. Currently, we are in the process of porting plugins to the 0.9.x branch.

Planning for GNOME 3.0

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gnome.org: During the first few months of 2008, a few Release Team members discussed here and there about the state of GNOME. So let's go to the core topic and discuss what the GNOME 3.0 effort should be. We propose the following list of areas to focus our efforts on:

Gnome 3.0 -- Please get rid of the file hierarchy

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ibeentoubuntu.com: Lots of people love Gnome Do. Why is that? It gives them power at their fingertips. More importantly, it takes the filesystem out of the picture.

5 Useful Desktop Managers for Linux

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techcityinc.com: Today I’m going to write about some of the most useful alternative desktop managers you should consider using on your operating system. To start off I have

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Mentor Embedded Linux adds SMACK security and IoT support

Mentor Graphics has updated Mentor Embedded Linux (MEL) with Yocto Project 2.0 code, SMACK security, and support for CANopen, BACNet, and 6LoWPAN. Mentor Graphics has spun a more secure and industrial IoT-ready version of its commercial Mentor Embedded Linux (MEL) distribution and development platform that moves up to a modern Linux codebase built around Yocto Project 2.0 (“Jethro”). Yocto Project 2.0, which advances to GCC 5.2 and adds Toaster support, among other enhancements, was recently adopted by rival embedded distro Wind River Linux 8. Read more

Development News

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  • Ready for a nostalgia kick? Usborne has put its old computer books on the web for free
    UK publishing house Usborne is giving out its iconic 1980s programming books as free downloads. The books, which are available for free as PDF files, include Usborne's introductions to programming series, adventure games, computer games listings and first computer series. The series was particularly popular in the UK, where they helped school a generation of developers and IT professionals.
  • LLVM Patches Confirm Google Has Its Own In-House Processor
    Patches published by Google developers today for LLVM/Clang confirm that the company has at least one in-house processor of its own. Jacques Pienaar, a software engineer at Google since 2014, posted patches today seeking to mainline a "Lanai" back-end inside LLVM. He explained they want to contribute their Lanai processor to the LLVM code-base as they continue developing this back-end with a focus on compiling C99 code. He mentions Lanai is a simple in-order 32-bit processor with 32 x 32-bit registers, two registers with fixed values, four used for program state tracking, and two reserved for explicit usage by user, and no floating point support.

Security Leftovers

New Ubuntu Phone Patch Is Coming Soon to Fix the Infamous Mir Bug, Says Canonical

Just a few moments ago, Łukasz Zemczak of Canonical sent in his daily report email to inform us about the latest work done by the Ubuntu Touch developers in preparation for the upcoming OTA releases. Read more