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Adobe answers cries for 64-bit Flash on Linux

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cnet.com: Starting to answer the clamorous demand from open-source fans, Adobe Systems plans to release an alpha version of its Flash Player technology on Monday for those using 64-bit Linux software.

Open source growth dims LAMP stack to symbolic status

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techtarget.com: Four years ago, LAMP was the open stack of choice, especially for Web servers. Today, however, LAMP is like an illuminated sign with only the "A" still visible. While the existence of an all-open source application stack remains helpful, there are so many choices beyond the original group that the LAMP acronym has fallen into disuse.

remind: a text based agenda and todolist manager

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debaday.debian.net: There are lots of different tools for managing your time. All these applications are based on a graphical user interface, and use either iCalendar or the older vCalendar as the data formats. What about people who prefer console based interfaces?

Compiz Fusion Community News for November 15, 2008: Can I haz plugins?

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smspillaz.wordpress: Wow, lots of news this edition, not exactly big news like last week, but we certainly have been bombarded with a whole bunch of new development code. This week, the big items are:

Xfce 4.6 Beta 2 (Hopper) released

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xfce.org: The second Beta was delayed for 2 weeks, but it was worth it. Every feature we made a freeze-exception for has made it into this release. This means a lot of bugs have been fixed this time as well:

Linux Equivalents To Things You Do In Windows

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pcmech.com: You’ve heard time and time again from Linux fans that "Linux can do anything Windows can do". Is this true? Yes. However what the Linux fans usually don’t mention is how to do the stuff you do in Windows in Linux.

In Search Of … A Python IDE

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meandubuntu.wordpress: I’ve finally gotten started on developing. After looking at a few options, I settled in on Python as the language and QT as the graphical toolkit - and after a few days of development I thought I might put a little effort into finding an IDE in hopes it would help me be a bit more productive.

Four Practical And Useful Compiz Fusion Plugins

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linuxloop.com: Just about everyone has seen or used some cool eyecandy Compiz Fusion plugins, but there are also quite a number of useful non-eyecandy plugins for Compiz Fusion. Today, I will look at four of the most interesting ones.

Playing poker on Ubuntu

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linuxowns.wordpress: Poker, the most popular card game of all times. Everyone loves it, but all the commercial poker clients are written for Windows. Can you get your fix on Ubuntu?

Gscrot: A Powerful Screen Capture Tool For Linux

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maketecheasier.com: Few days ago, I wrote about the various ways that I used to capture screenshots on my Ubuntu machine. In the comments, Imd mentioned about Gscrot being a great alternative screen capture tool. After checking it out, I must admit that it is by far the best screen capture software that I have seen in Linux platform.

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